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    11 Recipes

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    This is a variation of Aloo Gobi; a Punjabi classic made with potatoes (aloo) and cauliflower (gobi), however I have omitted the potatoes to lighten up on the carbs. I love Indian food because it’s inexpensive and relatively simple to prepare, but more importantly, it never fails to light up my eyes, nose and tastebuds with its piquant flavors and vivid colors. This dish is filling, without being a total carb bomb (sans potatoes) and the leftovers are good for a couple of lunches during the week.The combination of cauliflower and green peas may not sound like much, but they happen to be the perfect canvas to paint on the vibrant flavors of ginger, garlic and onions. The turmeric does it’s part by imparting a golden hue to the cauliflower contrasting to the green peas, making this dish look exciting. Indian food is all about the use and combination of spices for amazing flavors. Even though there are a lot of spices in the ingredient list, you will find that they are staples.

    Recipe #476628

    Kohlrabi, carrots and fennel are fused into a subtle salad that is refreshing and clean. The fennel seed and the sesame oil combine to mysterious effect, as you crunch your way through the salad. There's something about the dressing and the sweet crunchy vegetable batons that combine with the floral heat, creating a fanciful tingle on the tongue. This recipe comes from Ivy Manning's Farm to Table Cookbook.

    Recipe #465494

    Korea is not officially part of the Silk Road, but East-West trade extended there, and as a result, Korea’s cuisine influenced and was influenced by the travelers on the Silk Road. Pa Jun is a Korean pancake that can be served as a snack, appetizer, or side dish and is commonly found in Korean street markets. It’s a crispy scallion pancake that is chewy and moist on the inside, with fillings of carrots, mung beans and seafood. Today you can find it made in many different variations in most Korean restaurants, where it is served as a starter with a dipping sauce. Though Pa Jun is typically made with a pancake like batter, my Pa Jun is gluten free, made with rice flour. It’s speckled with zucchini and carrots and served with a ginger-soy dipping sauce--all together, a sure recipe for no leftovers. These pancakes can be eaten alone without the dipping sauce, just make sure to add some salt to taste to the batter.

    Recipe #464997

    This salad encompasses the radishes that are elongated with pink and white roots. It is eaten raw as an appetizer alone or chopped into a salad. I had this recipe in mind for the radishes, which looked so fresh and appetizing when I eyed it the Martha Stewart Living, May 2010 edition. The lime dressing and zest along with the sugar really brings out the flavors to a perfect ensemble. A sweet citrusy and fresh salad that is so crunchy, your head just might shake. I was not the biggest fan of radishes at first, because it tends to be a little too spicy and bitter for me, but this was not the case at all. The radishes were a welcome addition with the mango that offsets any bitterness. The bright colors of this salad represents the vibrant flavors.

    Recipe #429316

    THE TYPICAL name for this Puerto Rican dish is Pastelon; layered fried plantains with beef Bolognese and cheese. I have created a healthier vegetarian version by baking the plantains and using Trader Joe’s Soy Chorizo instead of beef Bolognese. Most Latin countries have their unique version of chorizo, which is a type of spicy sausage. Trader Joe’s Soy Chorizo is a Mexican version that has the consistency of ground beef combined with chile and hot spices. It’s important to use ripe plantains for this dish, because when ripened they are sweeter and softer. This dish is a type of fusion where Italian meets Latino for combustible flavor that is sweet and spicy blending together into a culinary bliss.

    Recipe #423163

    A Middle Eastern delight with dried apricots and dates enhanced with the aromatic flavors of cinnamon, cardamom and ginger giving this quinoa a rich warm and slightly sweet flavor. In fact it is sweet enough for a dessert, but I suggest it served with a curried vegetable dish. With this dish you are transported with flavors from around the world into your home. This recipe has been adapted from Martha Stewarts, Cinnamon Scented Couscous.

    Recipe #422035

    The key ingredients to this cake are the cinnamon and ginger, which add a warm welcoming spicy flavor. Especially delightful when served with vanilla ice cream, yoghurt or crème fraiche. This recipe is loosely adapted from Bob’s Red Mill Baking Book by John Ettinger and Bob’s Red Mill Family, 2007.

    Recipe #421051

    Zucchini is prevalent in the United Sates during the summer months and is a low fat vegetable that is high in vitamin C. The zucchini has a delicate flavor that requires little more than quick cooking with olive oil and fresh herbs, such as basil. This is a super easy recipe, and is a tasty side dish to any Mediterranean dish.

    Recipe #420211

    This is an unusual twist on the classic curry dish, which has a sweet kick to it with fennel undertones. The raisins and carrots add a rich color and delightful taste that will satiate your palate. This dish comes from my mother in law, Shirley in South Africa where many African dishes have an Indian influence because they descended in the 19th century as indentured workers transported to work on the sugar plantations of Natal. The result is a fusion Indo-African dish, which is best served over basmati rice.

    Recipe #419170

    Butternut Squash is a type of orange fleshed winter squash that has a sweet and nutty taste. In South Africa it is commonly cooked with cinnamon and nutmeg. I have to thank my sister in law Janine Solarsh from Johannesburg for sharing this with me enabling me to bring this across continents.

    Recipe #418473

    On a cold wintery day this is a superb soup to warm up your bones with ginger and cinnamon undertones. The original recipe for this soup was made famous by the Jerusalem Ramada Renaissance Hotel, however I added more depth to this so that it would be more suitable for a cold winter climate.

    Recipe #416286


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