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    84 Recipes

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    NOT to be confused with Bread and Butter Pudding which is a dessert, Bread Pudding is an old English dish which turns out more like a bar cake. This recipe is a more modern version of the one my grandmother used to make. Although Bread Pudding can be served warm with custard as a dessert, we rarely ate it this way. For us, it was more of a snack food. It tastes just as good at room temperature as it does hot. Grandma often tucked a slice or two into our school lunchboxes. When my brother joined the Navy he craved Bread Pudding and Mum had to pay a fortune to post one to him - clear across the country! This recipe was passed on to Mum by my older brother's friend, the late Nell McDonald. Nell was a great cook and I'm delighted to acknowledge her as the source of this recipe.

    Recipe #114398

    These were our favourite after-school treat in the 1960's - lovingly made by our grandma. Just three simple ingredients and hardly any preparation. Not only do these luscious treats look like beehives - you'd swear they had honey in them. After keeping for a while they might weep a little sticky liquid through the bottom - but don't worry, this makes them taste even yummier.

    Recipe #113994

    At Christmas time we love to serve our visitors these tiny Christmas cakes, baked in muffin tins. They're easy to make, dark, moist and full of flavour. Start this recipe at least one day ahead as the fruit needs to soak overnight. Preparation time does not include this step.

    Recipe #105332

    We used to buy this soup, but it disappeared from the supermarket shelves. Luckily, by then, I had eaten so much of it, it did not take too much time to recreate it. I think the home-made variety is even better!

    Recipe #105146

    These are tastier than anything I've ever eaten in a restaurant, and, better still, can be made a few hours ahead of your guests arriving. The recipe can be easily adjusted to feed less or more as required. The quantities given here are for a main course. I would normally serve this with steamed rice. This recipe is adapted from English food writer, Delia Smith.

    Recipe #104954

    This is the richest, heaviest, moistest, most alcoholic Christmas cake you're likely to find anywhere! It's from Australia's "Better Homes and Gardens" magazine (December 2002). The tablespoon measurements for the spices are correct - this cake is so flavoursome it can take this quantity of spice.

    Recipe #104270

    Christmas in Australia is just too hot for a heavy, traditional Christmas pudding. If you're having Christmas in a hot climate, try this! It's been our Christmas favourite for about 20 years. It provides all the wonderful fruity, groggy taste of a traditional Christmas pudding but it's light and easy to digest. What's more, you don't have to boil it and you can make it up to a week in advance. Preparation time does not include refrigeration time.

    Recipe #104057

    The slightly aniseed taste of fennel is a great match with carrots and potatoes, so I combined them all in this original recipe. It's a real treat served as a side dish with roast pork and gravy!

    Recipe #96673

    Chocolate lovers' heaven - calorie counters' hell! These are sooooo good, but very, very evil! Go on, try 'em - I KNOW you can't resist them! Recipe is from the Australian 'Country Style' magazine.

    Recipe #96674

    These are crunchy, caramelly, nutty and meringuey (if there is such a word). With that combination you KNOW they have to be good! This recipe is adapted from a book on Texas Cooking sent to me by Starlita from Texas.

    Recipe #96370

    This is SO simple to make! If you like ginger, you'll LOVE this. Think crunchy biscuit base, smothered with ginger flavoured icing topped with crystallised ginger. It's from an old Australia & New Zealand recipe book - apparently a recipe from New Zealand. We love it!

    Recipe #96104

    When I was a little girl we used to get watercress fresh from a running creek. It was a real treat. These days I have to buy it at the supermarket, but I still love its delicate flavour. I first tried Watercress Bisque when I was a member of a 'dining out' club. This is adapted from the recipe provided by the restaurant.

    Recipe #94239

    Sick of lumpy sauce? Hate making that flour and butter roux? Here's the answer! This is the easiest version of White Sauce ever. You won’t believe it works until you try it! You will need a wire balloon whisk for this recipe and you must make sure that all ingredients are cold (or at least at room temperature) to begin with. Thanks to English food writer, Delia Smith, for discovering this all-in-one method. The following are my simplified adaptations for Basic White Sauce, along with variations for Mustard Sauce, Cheese Sauce (Mornay Sauce) and Parsley Sauce.

    Recipe #92008

    Detergent for the dishwasher is SO expensive. I searched the net for a home-made alternative and developed this simple recipe. We've been using it for a while now and it washes the dishes even better than the shop bought variety. The amount needed will depend on how soft your water is - we find 1 tablespoon is enough, but we're on tank water. You might need 2 tablespoons if you're on hard town water. Instead of Rinse Aid, we just use white vinegar.

    Recipe #91963

    This lovely cabbage side dish features: a cheese and breadcrumb topping; tender, steamed cabbage; crunchy toasted almonds; and a delicate, slightly sweet, slightly spicy cream sauce. Better still, it can be prepared up to cooking stage several hours in advance. You won't need sauce or gravy with your meat if you use this as a side dish. The creamy sauce is fairly thin and spreads across the plate to combine beautifully with the meat juices. Use it to accompany any meat that is served *without* a sauce (e.g. grilled or broiled steak or chicken). This dish is very liberally adapted from a similar recipe by Australian food writer, Margaret Fulton.

    Recipe #91354

    This is a quick version of Hungarian Soup but it is still as thick, rich, spicy, warming and filling as Hungarian Soup should be! I've been making versions of this soup for 20 years, depending on what I have on hand in the pantry, so don't be afraid to make substitutions or omissions. This is a perfect main-meal soup for lunch on a cold winter's day. Serve it with pumperknickel or rye bread. For a special treat, team it with andypandy's German Onion Pie. (Recipezaar #77687). I don't claim that this is an authentic Hungarian Soup - but I do guarantee that it tastes delicious!

    Recipe #90377

    I'm a bit embarrassed about this recipe because I'm NOT a fan of the style of cooking which 'assembles' pre-packaged products. However, sometimes, it's cold outside, you're tired, the cupboard is bare, the local store does not stock much more than canned goods and they would laugh in your face if you asked for a bunch of fresh asparagus! So, on such a day and under such conditions, I created this soup. And, whaddya know? It was so darn good I'm gonna share it!

    Recipe #90338

    These old fashioned puddings have now been rediscovered by 'cafe society' and are common on the menus of the best restaurants. I cook them in a muffin tin to provide easy individual servings. They are so good I've given batches of them, together with a bottle of their delicious sauce, as Christmas presents. In winter, it's wonderful to make a batch or two and keep them handy in the freezer - simply reheat gently in the microwave or in the oven. The sauce will keep for at least a week in the refrigerator, but it's easy to make when you need it anyway. Many thanks to Lorraine from the beautiful Maleny Lodge Bed & Breakfast for this recipe.

    Recipe #88565

    I saw this soup made on television one cold, wet morning. It looked so delicious I shot up to the shop, bought some pumpkin and made it for lunch. It was absolutely delicious, silky smooth and not too spicy. This recipe serves 8, but if there is any left over, it can be frozen and reheated in the microwave.

    Recipe #88347

    This is our favourite recipe for lamb shanks. Good enough for guests and just glorious on a cold, winter's night served with rice, cous cous or creamy mashed potatoes.

    Recipe #88342

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