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    84 Recipes

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    This is an old family favourite. I love it because it's quick and easy to whip up and it can be eaten warm - so you don't even have to wait for it to cool - perfect for unexpected guests! It only makes a fairly small cake - but quite enough for morning or afternoon tea - and it's nicer eaten fresh and warm from the oven. This recipe is from my Bible of cooking, Margaret Fulton's Encyclopedia of Food and Cookery.

    Recipe #199802

    This recipe is adapted from one of my 'Bibles' of cooking - an old 70s "Australian and New Zealand Complete Book of Cookery". It's a treasure. These carrots do take a bit of time - allow an hour to prepare - but they are sweet and delicious and well worth the little extra bit of effort.

    Recipe #196870

    These little puddings, adapted from Australian chef Bill Granger, are rich, moist, decadent and delicious - but remarkably easy to make. Kids will love them!

    Recipe #193598

    TV chefs are always telling you how wonderful their recipes are, so when Karen Martini of Australia's "Better Homes and Gardens" TV show said, "This will be the best roast chicken you've ever made!" I was sceptical. "Well, it looks pretty good, but I don't know about Roast Chicken without a nice rich gravy," I thought. Nevertheless, I decided to give it a try. Now I can honestly say, "THIS WAS THE BEST ROAST CHICKEN I HAVE EVER MADE OR EATEN" - and boy I've eaten some roast chicken in my time! Now, I must confess to having amended Ms Martini's excellent recipe a bit. Her idea of 'rustic' is to just chop up all the garlic without peeling any of it, throw in the onion with the peel still on, and add the herbs still on their woody stalks. I wasn't keen on the idea of spitting out bits of papery garlic peel and burned bits of stalk as I ate, so I peeled most of the garlic and stripped some of the herbs from their stalks before adding them to the chicken. If you want to be authentically rustic, by all means, just whack everything in with no preparation - it will certainly save a lot of time. The other change I made to the recipe was that I boosted up the sauce a bit. I like LOTS of sauce, and although the chicken yielded a good amount when it was cut, I wanted lashings, so I topped it up with some chicken stock and another good squeeze of lemon juice. Again, whether you do this is entirely up to you. All I can promise is that if you make this chicken the way I did, it should be the best roast chicken you've ever had. Oh, and by the way, although it's wonderfully flavoursome and succulent served hot - it's almost better cold because the garlicky lemony flavour seems to come out even more! Did I mention I love this recipe? Oh, shut up, Kooka and tell the people how to make it!

    Recipe #192098

    This is one of those 'good news' and 'bad news' recipes. The bad news is this cake takes a lot of time to make. The good news is that it isn't actually difficult - just time-consuming. The bad news is that it's quite expensive. The good news is that it's really worth it for a special occasion. To make it easy on yourself, prepare it over two days. The glace oranges have to be soaked overnight, so I'd prepare them, boil the oranges and make the syrup on one day, then make the cake and finish the glace oranges the next day, and serve the cake on the third day. I think it's probably better for keeping in the fridge for a day before it's served. I was really, really sceptical about making this cake, but did it because a friend particularly wanted it for her birthday. To my surprise it turned out dense and moist and delicious and full of orangey flavour. It was a real hit. It's actually not the most attractive cake in the world when you take it out of the oven, but add the glace oranges to the top (buy them if you don't want to make them yourself) and it comes up quite presentable. Served with the Orange and Sauternes Sauce and a dollop of thick cream you'll forget all about what a pain it was to make. :-) In fact, my friend says her neighbour turned up at breakfast time the next day asking if there was any more of 'that cake' left! This recipe is adapted from one that appeared in Australia's "Better Homes and Gardens" magazine. The syrup recipe is pinched from Chrissyo's Orange and Almond Cake Recipe #38551 .

    Recipe #188922

    I met Debbie when I was 11 years old and she knocked at our door and asked if I could come out to play. We're still friends nearly 40 years later! She brought this chocolate slice up for morning tea recently and we thought it was wonderful! We hope you'll love it too!

    Recipe #182800

    We've enjoyed this very tasty, creamy mushroom soup for years. Now, at last, I've written down the recipe! This soup freezes well and can be thawed and reheated in the microwave.

    Recipe #182081

    I think this is the perfect dinner party recipe! Easy enough for a beginner cook to handle and yet really impressive! I see no reason why you can't prepare this recipe in advance, up to the wrapping in foil stage, then refrigerate it until you're ready to cook it - perhaps adding 15 minutes to the cooking time. You could substitute a half and half mixture of ordinary sour cream and double cream for the creme fraiche, but the creme fraiche is best and won't separate. This dish is rich, so it only needs simple side dishes. I serve it with Potatoes Anna Recipe #103214 and a steamed green vegetable. It also reheated well in the microwave the next day. It's adapted from a Delia Smith recipe.

    Recipe #182067

    I saw someone cooking these on a television show. They didn't give any quantities, but I've adapted this recipe from what I saw. It might not be authentic Beans a la Bordelaise, but it tastes great, so who cares? By the way, as well as cooking this in a pan, I've cooked this dish in a foil container on the barbecue (grill).

    Recipe #180914

    This is our standard strawberry recipe. Absolutely simple, but good enough to serve with cream at the poshest of dinner parties. The sugar and lemon draws the juice out of the strawberries, resulting in lots of lovely pink 'sauce' - so do try to soak them for at least 2 hours. (Preparation time does not include time needed to macerate the strawberries.)

    Recipe #175792

    These make a terrific light lunch or dinner, or can be served cold for a picnic. They'd also be nice as finger food for a party. So versatile, and you won't believe how easy they are to make! I've adapted this recipe from one by Jamie Oliver. I serve mine drizzled with Ranch Dressing, made using Mirj's Homemade Ranch Dressing Recipe #60078. Jamie serves his with yoghurt and lemon juice. They would also be terrific served with sour cream and sweet chilli sauce. Use your imagination!

    Recipe #171390

    This recipe is adapted from an Upside-Down Caramel Banana Cake recipe I found in Australia's 'Delicious' magazine. If you don't eat all of this cake immediately, it keeps well in the fridge. We just cut a couple of slices, put them on a plate, uncovered, and pop them into the microwave for a minute on HIGH. Serve drizzled with extra golden syrup and cream. If you want to try the Upside-Down Banana Cake, it's posted here as Recipe #160539.

    Recipe #168362

    This is adapted from a recipe given to me by Zaar member, Dee514. I've always had trouble making good Hot Cross Buns but these turned out beautifully. They do take quite a lot of time to make - about 4-5 hours from start to finish, but the end result is worth it. Think of it as a labour of love. Thanks Dee!

    Recipe #164566

    Bananas and caramel are a combination made in heaven. This cake tastes incredible with its combination of bananas and caramel drenched cake. Further, it looks spectacular, like one of those cakes you see in a high class coffee-shop - but it's actually really easy to make. This recipe is originally from Australia's 'Delicious' magazine. Try it, you won't be disappointed.

    Recipe #160539

    This is so quick and easy and makes the most delicious light supper you'll ever eat! Please try it, it really is stunning! I've adapted this recipe from Australia's "Better Homes and Gardens" magazine, but it is a traditional Italian way of serving spaghetti. The quantities given serve 2, but just double them to serve 4.

    Recipe #151748

    I've adapted this recipe from the Australian Women's Weekly Asian Meals in Minutes cookbook to accommodate things I usually have in my pantry and freezer. Feel free to substitute as I do if you wish. I cook rice in large quantities then divide it into serving sizes in ziplock bags and freeze it. This makes a nice side-dish for Chinese food but we like it as an easy, tasty and light weekend supper. The quantity given will make four main meal serves or about 6 serves as a side dish.

    Recipe #147968

    This was my first attempt at glazed clay pot cooking, although this recipe could easily be adapted for crackpot or conventional cooking. I've adapted the recipe from one I found on Asian Recipes Online. We were delighted with the result! Of course, fresh is always best, but, if you're in a hurry you can use bottled ingredients or herbs 'in a tube'. I did and the result was still wonderful.

    Recipe #141041

    Mother Kooka was served this as a dipping sauce with battered fish fillets at a restaurant in Hervey Bay. It would be good as a dipping sauce for spring rolls or rice paper rolls as well. The chef kindly shared the ingredients with me, but not the quantities. I think this is a good replica of the original. When I got home, I made it up and decided it would be great as a stir fry sauce for a beef, cabbage and vegetable stir fry. I was right! Just stir fry the finely sliced meat and vegetables (I added some fresh ginger and garlic as well) then stir in this sauce. You could add some chilli to it if you like, or, if using as a dipping sauce, float some toasted sesame seeds on top. It would also be a great sauce to serve with hokkein noodles. Enjoy!

    Recipe #132720

    Oh wow! This is seriously good! Slightly tart apples topped with a light sponge and drizzled (before cooking) with a caramel sauce that works its way through the whole dish! Real comfort food! I found this recipe in Australia's 'Delicious' Cooking Magazine and have adapted it slightly. It will serve 8 generously but could stretch to more if necessary.

    Recipe #129755

    On a cold, bleak day, this is ideal as a pre-dinner drink. This quantity makes 2 generous serves, or 4 small serves. Freshly squeezed orange juice, of course, is ideal - but you can get away with bottled orange juice.

    Recipe #124503

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