Recipe Sifter

X
  • Start Here
    • Course
    • Main Ingredient
    • Cuisine
    • Preparation
    • Occasion
    • Diet
    • Nutrition
1

Select () or exclude () categories to narrow your recipe search.

2

As you select categories, the number of matching recipes will update.

Make some selections to begin narrowing your results.
  • Calories
  • Amount per serving
    1. Total Fat
    2. Saturated Fat
    3. Polyunsat. Fat
    4. Monounsat. Fat
    5. Trans Fat
  • Cholesterol
  • Sodium
  • Potassium
  • Total Carbohydrates
    1. Dietary Fiber
    2. Sugars
  • Protein
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin B6
  • Vitamin B12
  • Vitamin C
  • Calcium
  • Iron
  • Vitamin E
  • Magnesium
  • Alcohol
  • Caffeine
  • Find exactly what you're looking for with the web's most powerful recipe filtering tool.

    You are in: Home / Fluffkins's Public Recipes
    Lost? Site Map

    Recipe Box is Here

    Save your favorite recipes

    Upload your own

    Create and manage Shopping Lists

    Share with friends

    11 Recipes

    Sort by: Newest | Rating | Photos | Time to Make | A-Z

    Kind of made this one up after I tried shooting for Taiwanese popcorn chicken but didn't have sweet potato starch. I'd already marinated the chicken in 5 spice powder so by the time I found another recipe online for Japanese-Style Deep Fried chicken, it'd been marinating for about an hour. I didn't have any "fresh grated ginger" so I used powdered ginger, omitted sesame oil altogether (ran out) and Threw it together and voila, a quick pre-dinner snack with somen, ramen noodle or rice. Tastes good, but doesn't reheat as well as I would've liked, so it's not one of those meals you can make a deal in advance. The potato starch I used is called Katakurico, which can be found at most grocery chain stores as well as every Asian market I've been. The sweet rice flour's brand is Mochiko, which I got from a little Vietnamese supermarket.

    Recipe #444821

    Made with the ingredients I had on hand - simple to make, and kids love it. If using eggs, for 3 cups of brown rice you'll want at least 8 eggs (I initially did 4 because I already had chicken - and ended up not even seeing any eggs in the final product!) My friend, who prefers a saltier fried rice thought it a bit bland so I added some Soy Vey marinade while frying. You can find it at your local grocer. I read from other reviewers on other Food.com fried rice recipes that white pepper makes the dish, so I added that - and saw no diff. If you don't have white pepper I don't think it will kill you to use regular black pepper. I have also seen people add red pepper flakes to add some kick to it - I leave it out because I don't eat spicy foods. Instead of chicken I'd use Chinese sausage if I could - it's sweeter, and kids love it. Problem is that it's really oily - and we try to avoid pork. Adjust the ingredients to your taste and enjoy!

    Recipe #436988

    I have tried various recipes for beef and broccoli but this one works best and is easiest one for me to prepare in very little time. Serve over steamed rice for a quick weekday dinner without the preservatives of a boxed microwavable entree. I usually get ribeye or filet mignon strips, so that it is not so tough when I try to chew the meat. The local grocery store should sell them already precut in prepackaged trays. If you want some spice, you can add pepper flakes to the sauce for added flavor. For onion lovers, you can also sautee some onions on the side and add it to the mix for additional variety in your dish.

    Recipe #429232

    This is a recipe that my friend obsessed on years ago, when we were in college. It's not bad with some good old steamed white rice. I sometimes paired it with salad instead of rice. My friend was heavy on the salt because that's the way her mother cooked, but I am less of a salt freak so it is up to you. If you google Vietnamese stuffed tomatoes, there are many variations of this recipe. This is what worked for me. I seldom make this anymore, but if I did again, I would probably try using ground turkey instead of pork - it should come out okay. Remember to pack the tomatoes tightly, as the meat will slip out while cooking if it is loosely packed into the tomato "cups"

    Recipe #429231

    Had some Chinese eggplants on hand with nothing to do so I checked around online and put something together on my own to eat with rice. Other recipes I've seen mentioned ginger, peanut oil, chili and green onions, but I didn't have any on hand.

    Recipe #426382

    Ever wonder what to do with that bag of veggies you have leftover after finishing your take-out order of Vietnamese soup (pho)? Usually just trash the bag of bean sprouts, basil and limes? Well here is something useful for them - my friend called it "Viet Guac" as a joke, but I ended up making it. And wouldn't you know it? It actually turned out to be pretty tasty, especially with the caramelized onions I still had in the fridge. I served it with Tostitos' hint of lime flavored chips, or the plain is fine, too. Time doesn't include how long it takes to make caramelized onions - if you're in a hurry, raw or slightly sauteed is fine, too. Just add a little sugar to taste. I add brown sugar to my caramelized onions, so it made it nice and sweet, for kids' tastes.

    Recipe #422620

    Got this recipe from my friend's mom, who makes it with pork. I haven't tried it with the pork, only turkey. Kids love this recipe - it goes well over rice. Best part is that it takes no time at all to make. On days when I don't have time, I simply mix everything together beforehand, cover it in saran wrap and throw the Corel bowl (which I can put directly into a steamer) into the fridge until 30 minutes before dinner time. To avoid using the chicken bouillon I have tried using chicken broth, but I really see no difference in taste. So I normally just make it using water and skipping the chicken bouillon altogether.

    Recipe #412292

    This recipe is from my late grandmother, who passed it down to my mother. And since my mother eyes the ingredients, I never quite got the exact amounts that would make it as perfect as my mother's. Used to make this all the time in college in large batches, reheating it in a toaster oven and serving it with a salad or white rice for a quick dinner during the week. Should've written down the amounts I had put in, but never got around to it - please post the amounts that work for you. I used to add MSG (labeled Accent), but stopped using it - didn't see a difference in taste. Time includes marinading time

    Recipe #411669

    I add this to the somen noodles I serve my Taiwanese Spaghetti recipe with for a little extra sweetness. Found this recipe off the internet from someone who would eat the somen noodles made this way alone (kind of bland in my opinion, but you can eat it that way, too). This noodle can be served cold or warm, depending on preference. Cooking time is the time it takes to boil the somen noodles

    Recipe #410851

    I recently started dabbling in Taiwanese cuisine and came across this recipe that is commonly made in Taiwan, comparable to the American spaghetti and meatballs made for children here in the States. It's considered a comfort food, served on either rice or Japanese somen noodles. It has a sweet taste to it so children like it, and you can make it with or without tofu. It is also traditionally served with sliced cucumber, but I have found that it doesn't make that much of a different to the food. It is usually made with ground pork, but I avoid pork so I have only had it using turkey. I imagine it probably tastes just as good with ground beef as well. I will post my somen noodle sauce recipe soon, too - it tastes much better than plain somen noodles.

    Recipe #410704

    Got this recipe off the back of a package of Dynasty Chow Funn Noodles pack and tweaked it according to what I had in stock (the original recipe called for pork, but I used chicken breast instead). It came out well and was a quick change of pace for a weekday family dinner. I purchased the noodles from Hows supermarket - but it can probably be found at most generic American supermarket chains.

    Recipe #403121


    Displaying up to 20 pages of results. To see all results, or register.
    Advertisement

    Free Weekly Newsletter

    Get the latest recipes and tips delivered right to your inbox.

    Your e-mail is safe. Privacy Policy
    Advertisement

    Food.com Network of Sites

    • Mexican Recipes
    • Chinese Recipes
    • Australian Recipes
    • Breakfast Recipes
    • Greek Recipes
    • Restaurant Recipes
    • Italian Recipes
    • Christmas Recipes
    • Thanksgiving Recipes
    • Southern Recipes
    • Dessert Recipes
    • Deep Fried Recipes
    • Thai Recipes
    • Low Cholesterol Recipes
    • Indian Recipes
    • Healthy Recipes
    • Meatloaf Recipes