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    You are in: Home / Recipes / Turkish Cacik Recipe
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    Turkish Cacik

    Average Rating:

    19 Total Reviews

    Showing 1-19 of 19

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    • on March 28, 2010

      Delicious! I use fresh mint and grate the cucumbers. Reviewed for PAC Spring 2010.

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    • on March 23, 2010

      I made a third of this which worked fine. I added in about 1/4 cup water to make it a bit soupier however I did want to use it as a sauce that didn't go absolutely everywhere so stopped at that. It's delicious and I'll make it again before my tub of yoghurt is finished!

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    • on February 20, 2010

      As indicated I added water to make this more soupy. Also drizzled more olive oil on top before serving along with some paprika. Great taste and thank you for posting.

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    • on May 09, 2009

      I am Turkish and the consistency in the pictures posted is wrong. The recipe posted left the consistency open to interpretation. Cacik is more soupy liquid, rather than creamy as pictured. But I guess if you like creamy better, then that's fine. I am just saying that in Turkey cacik is made thinner/more liquid than the user pics posted.

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    • on January 26, 2009

      Delicious dish that I made to go with Kofte. My whole family enjoyed this, and my husband even used the leftovers to top his rice the next night. I did use fres mint, but cut the amount in half. Terrific!

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    • on April 24, 2008

      What can I say this was a fantastic recipe to go with the meatballs I made. People are still commenting on this being served. I have been asked for the recipe twice now! I will be making this again!

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    • on February 09, 2008

      The yoghurt-cucumber combination is just divine.

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    • on January 05, 2008

      I made this to serve with Chef Flower's Turkish Cypriot Fried Meatballs - Kibrisli Kofte /. It was absolutely wonderful. A recipe I'll use again and again.

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    • on May 30, 2007

      YUM! I made this to go with Chef Flower's Turkish Cypriot Fried Meatballs - Kibrisli Kofte /. It really complimented the dish wonderfully. I didn't feel the need to add any of the water and omitted the oil.I also enjoy it served as a dip with grilled greek flat bread. Thanks so much for sharing. This is something that is really loved in our house and will be made often!

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    • on January 29, 2007

      I have found that some fresh dill or mint gives this an extra something. Plus my Turkish boyfriend suggested it to be completely true to form.

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    • on September 09, 2006

      nice

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    • on September 05, 2006

      My parents are Cypriot Turks and its a dish they were taught when they were children. I often make it when we have a BBQ's as a sauce for the lamb or chicken. My husband & daughter love the refreshing flavours. I drizzle olive oil and place a small fresh mint on the top for garnish.

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    • on November 02, 2005

      We had a salad supper at church and I made this for one of my dishes. We absolutely loved it. It was well received and everyone commented on how refreshing and soothing it was. DH ate the leftovers and I have added to our regular lineup. It is soooo much better than the mayo based cucumber salads normally made. Thank you for sharing. Looking forward to having with some Tandoori.

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    • on June 11, 2005

      Hi - just a comment... this seemed awfully familiar to me and I felt I knew this by another name although it took me a few moments to recall (and get the spelling right!) - but this is also known as Tzatziki - a traditional Greek recipe as well as Turkish. None too surprising given the interactions and a few battles between the Greeks and Turks over the centuries. Also worth a recipe search on 'Tzatziki' as they are so incredibly similar.

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    • on May 20, 2005

      This has long been one of my favorites (I'm Turkish too) and your recipe is a very good one! The longer it sits in the fridge, the better it tastes. Sometimes I also like to add a little bit of lemon juice (about a tablespoon), or some fresh dill, as well.

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    • on April 10, 2005

      I made this today to offset some very spicy food, and it functioned well. I think mine was probably a little more "chewy" because I used Japanese cucumbers, and didn't peel or seed them. It's still very good. Next time I think I will try it with fresh mint. Thank you very much for posting this recipe.

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    • on February 08, 2005

      Yum - one of my favorites. But I prefer thyme in mine! Incidentally, the more garlic, the better...

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    • on November 11, 2004

      I prefer it with fresh mint and coriander, finely chopped.

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    • on July 12, 2004

      Very nice refreshing dish and a good way of serving cucumber. The chilling in the fridge is important and the time allows the flavours to develop.

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    Nutritional Facts for Turkish Cacik

    Serving Size: 1 (238 g)

    Servings Per Recipe: 4

    Amount Per Serving
    % Daily Value
    Calories 172.7
     
    Calories from Fat 99
    57%
    Total Fat 11.0 g
    16%
    Saturated Fat 3.5 g
    17%
    Cholesterol 15.9 mg
    5%
    Sodium 64.0 mg
    2%
    Total Carbohydrate 14.8 g
    4%
    Dietary Fiber 1.4 g
    5%
    Sugars 9.4 g
    37%
    Protein 5.9 g
    11%

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