Traditional Persian Basmati Rice With Tadig

Total Time
50mins
Prep 5 mins
Cook 45 mins

My father is from Iran and this is the way he makes it. It makes amazing, fluffy rice with an amazing crispy crust! You have to try this!

Directions

  1. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. (Make sure the pot is a heavy bottom pot.).
  2. Add 3-4 tablespoons of salt to the water.
  3. Scoop out the desired amount of rice into a bowl (whatever amount you want, just remember 1 cup dry makes 3 cups cooked).
  4. Pour water over it to rinse it and then pour the water off.
  5. Repeat this until the water runs clear.
  6. Add the rice to the boiling water.
  7. Boil rapidly for 5 minutes.
  8. Bring pot to the sink and turn the cold water on to make the starchy water overflow.
  9. Drain into a colander.
  10. Put the pot back onto the stove at medium to medium high heat (this may vary depending on your stove) and add oil (enough to just cover the bottom).
  11. In a small bowl, melt butter (about 1 tablespoon of butter per cup of dry rice) with a pinch saffron in it (if you have a mortar and pestel, grind the saffron first, otherwise, don't worry about it).
  12. Sprinkle the rice with a spoon into a mound in the pan on the stove.
  13. Poke 3-4 holes into the top and pour the butter down the holes.
  14. Take a scoop of the rice from the mound and stir in the bowl used to melt the butter (just to get the last of the saffron butter out).
  15. Put the rice back into the pot.
  16. Place about 3 layers of paper towels to cover the top of the pan and then place the lid tightly over the pan.
  17. Cook at the medium-medium high heat for 8 minutes.
  18. Turn the stove down to the lowest temperature it will go and steam for 35 more minutes.
  19. To serve, scoop the rice out from the top of the pan being careful not to brake the crust on the bottom.
  20. Once all the rice is out except for the crust (tadig), take another plate, big enough to cover the opening of the pan and flip the crust out onto the pan. It should be golden brown and beautiful! If it is black, the temperature of your stove was too high and the entire pot of rice may taste burnt.
  21. Once you get the hang of this you can try using sliced rounds of potato or pita bread on the bottom of the pan before you sprinkle in the boiled rice (both of these options are very yummy!).
Most Helpful

Use a heavy bottomed pan and make sure that you use paper towels so that the water does not escape. You can soak it for a couple of hours before too.

The Indiscriminate Cook July 10, 2013

This rice was a bit too dry. Maybe you must soak the rice?? I cooked the rice longer than 5 minutes in the boiling water, approximately 8-9 minutes. I used sea salt, to taste, Indian white basmati rice, a generous pinch Iranian saffron (loved how it coloured some of the rice - I always wanted to do that), sweet butter (unsalted), and canola oil. Usually I have seen rose water mixed with saffron so that would have added a bit more liquid to the rice and not let it be dry. I'd like to try this again with rose water or water sprinkled over top before steaming. Made for Visiting Iran(Persia) in June 2012!%u200F

UmmBinat June 11, 2012

I am the Argentine best friend and this rice is my husband's and my favorite! The Tadig is the yummiest part.

Cookie monster's wife August 06, 2010