Szechuan Peppery Hot Chicken

Total Time
25mins
Prep 15 mins
Cook 10 mins

Szechuen Peppercorns have a distinctive bitter sweet chili kind of flavor and this flavor combined with the chili oil etc is what gives the true Szechuan flavor. So look for the real Szechuen pepper corns. You can control the heat by increasing or cutting backon the heat. You may want to add some chili paste as well. Just stir fry the the cut up chicken until cooked, keep it warm and stir fry the sprouts until they are just heated through combine and ther's your dinner.

Ingredients Nutrition

Directions

  1. Mix all the sauce ingredients to gether in a bowl.
  2. Arrange warm chicken and hot sprouts on a platter and pour the sauce over.

Reviews

(2)
Most Helpful

Szechuan peppercorns (Xanthoxylum piperitum) are not at all hot. In fact they aren't even peppercorns, but a kind of berry. Called "hwa jao" in Mandarin or "fa joo" in Cantonese, they have a slight numbing effect on the tongue rather than burning. The heat in Szechuan recipes comes from chiles of various types and in various forms. (See below) They are generally used in either of two ways: For stir fried dishes: heat a dry skillet (no oil) on medium flame and add the Szechuan peppercorns. Toss and stir until they start to smoke a little. (Don't burn them). When cool enough to work with grind them in a spice mill, mortar & pestle or pepper grinder. (I have an old electric coffee grinder that I use expressly for grinding spices). Use whatever the recipe calls for and freeze the rest in a plastic container. For stews: add them whole along with the other seasonings and remove before serving. This ingredient is one of the key flavoring elements of Szechuan cuisine and has no substitute. Nothing else I've ever found tastes remotely like it. But it is definitely not hot! For heat you can use fresh or dried green or red chiles such as finger hots, jalapenos or serranos. Leave the seeds in for more intense heat. (Warning: wear something to protect your hands while working with fresh chiles! And never get them anywhere near your eyes)! There are also several types of hot sauces/condiments available in Asian markets. Chile oil comes in bottles but generally isn't very hot - at least the brands I've found. You can make your own if you like and make it as hot as you wish. There are also a few kinds of chile sauce that don't have an oil base; some have garlic, others don't. Szechuan hot bean paste, another of the essential ingredients of the cuisine, comes in cans. (There's also a bottled version that's murderously hot). Another good condiment to have on hand is called chile paste with garlic. When using it you should cut back on chiles and garlic in the recipe. tgobbi

tgobbi January 22, 2002

Very tasty and quick stir fry. I added red, yellow and green bell pepper but didn't care for them with the sauce. The recipe is perfect as written.

sugarpea February 29, 2004

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