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    You are in: Home / Recipes / Sourdough Starter Recipe
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    Sourdough Starter

    Sourdough Starter. Photo by Chef Stevo

    1/1 Photo of Sourdough Starter

    Total Time:

    Prep Time:

    Cook Time:

    240 hrs

    240 hrs

    0 mins

    KimmieOH's Note:

    Here is an excellent Sourdough Starter that you can use to add rich flavor to bread and rolls. This starter takes time to mature, but the taste is well worth the wait. Nothing beats the tang and chewy texture of sourdough bread, especially when it comes straight out of your own oven. From its firm crust to its soft interior, this bread is in a class of its own.

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    Ingredients:

    Yield:

    Cups

    Units: US | Metric

    Directions:

    1. 1
      DAY 1 Dissolve sugar in 1/2 cup of the warm water in large glass bowl.
    2. 2
      DO NOT USE METAL BOWL.
    3. 3
      Sprinkle yeast into water; let stand 10 minutes.
    4. 4
      Stir in remaining 1-1/2 cups water and 2 cups flour.
    5. 5
      Beat until smooth.
    6. 6
      Cover bowl tightly with plastic wrap and leave overnight at room temperature.
    7. 7
      DAY 2 Add Day 2 ingredients 1 cup white bread flour, 1 cup milk and 1/2c. sugar to Sourdough mixture in bowl.
    8. 8
      Beat until smooth.
    9. 9
      Cover loosely with plastic wrap.
    10. 10
      Refrigerate.
    11. 11
      DAY 3 Stir until smooth.
    12. 12
      Refrigerate.
    13. 13
      DAY 4 Repeat Day 3.
    14. 14
      DAY 5 Repeat Day 2.
    15. 15
      DAY 6-10 Stir well once a day.
    16. 16
      Your sourdough starter should have grown to at least 4 cups, and should be the consistency of thin pancake batter.
    17. 17
      If it is thicker, add lukewarm water until the desired consistency is achieved before using it in a recipe.
    18. 18
      Give 1 cup away to a friend.
    19. 19
      Use the rest for your own baking.
    20. 20
      When your Sourdough is down to 1 cup OR once every 10 days, feed it as on Day 2 and let it grow again.
    21. 21
      You can freeze Sourdough mixture for up to 3 months.
    22. 22
      Before using, thaw slowly in refrigerator for 24 hours.
    23. 23
      Feed it as on day 2 and leave at room temperature overnight before using.

    Ratings & Reviews:

    • on May 24, 2014

      35

      This did not turn out like I expected it to. It is not a sourdough bread, so do not be deceived. The finished loaf actually has a sweet fermented taste to it rather than the typical sourdough taste (not to mention the use of store bought yeast to start the process). If you are looking for the authentic sourdough taste this is not for you. However if you are just looking for a recipe with a different, somewhat unique flavor, it is not a bad tasting bread. Overall, I'm not sure if the taste is worth the long process it takes to make it, but if you have a lot free time, go for it.

      people found this review Helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No
    • on July 26, 2013

      This is not sourdough. Sourdough uses wild yeast that occurs in nature. This recipe calls for "active dry yeast" which is the wrong yeast. In fact that type of yeast will die in a sourdough culture. To make sourdough you use flower and water and time, NOTHING ELSE. <br/><br/>Sourdough starter has a Lactobacillus culture in symbiotic combination with yeasts. It produces vinegar and alcohol that KILLS OFF the active yeast. <br/><br/>Active yeast is Brewers yeast, or Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Sourdough is Saccharomyces exiguus. These are completely different species. <br/><br/>Any and all recipes that use store bought yeast OR NOT SOURDOUGH. They are no more sourdough than what you get at the grocery store, bread with vinegar added, and labeled sourdough.

      people found this review Helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No
    • on May 12, 2011

      55

      This was easy to make, I followed the directions to the letter, however I wasn't sure when you could start baking with the starter. So I waited until the 6th day. I used recipe Sourdough Bread to make my first sourdough bread. I have to admit I was a bit skeptical at first and a little leery about trying it out but I'm glad I did. The only thing that I think could have been different is that it could have been a little more sour tasting but that could probably be fixed by just allowing it to sit in the fridge a couple of days longer to achieve the sour taste. Since I still have some starter leftover I will make some more in about 4 days. Either way it's a great recipe, even my mom enjoyed it, but that's probably because it wasn't too sour.

      people found this review Helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No

    Read All Reviews (21)

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    Nutritional Facts for Sourdough Starter

    Serving Size: 1 (1204 g)

    Servings Per Recipe: 1

    Amount Per Serving
    % Daily Value
    Calories 486.9
     
    Calories from Fat 29
    80%
    Total Fat 3.2 g
    5%
    Saturated Fat 1.5 g
    7%
    Cholesterol 8.5 mg
    2%
    Sodium 36.5 mg
    1%
    Total Carbohydrate 101.1 g
    33%
    Dietary Fiber 3.0 g
    12%
    Sugars 26.2 g
    105%
    Protein 12.4 g
    24%

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