6 Reviews

SHIU MAI is CHINESE, not Japanese. Other than that, it's on OK recipe. I would call this a fusion Asian dish as it uses mirin, which is from Japan and definitely not used in traditional Chinese dishes.

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Just Happy February 13, 2008

I made these tonite, but they didn't come out right.. the beef fat pooled into the bottom of the dumplings, so the meat didn't adhere to the dumpling dough, and were essentially a meatball rolling around in a pasta bucket full of grease after 12 minutes of steaming on low.. I used lean beef, too, so I'm not sure why this happened.. I made sure I wrapped them tight, and they looked fabulous in the raw stage, lol.. I will try this again using ground pork next time, for I love these Polish Shu Mai (LOL).. ;).. I will not give up..

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steve in FL December 28, 2007

I did try it and no matter where it was from it still tasted good! :)

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saternoutlaw June 20, 2007

Ahem. Shu Mai is also eaten in Japan. Origins may be Chinese, but I would still consider it a Japanese dish. American pizza is a far cry from the original Italian pizza. This recipe sounds really good.

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Tomo TheCat July 21, 2004

I have not tried this one either but everyone should know that shu mai is not Japanese but Chinese steamed dumplings eaten in the morning along with other dim sum dishes. This person just pronounced it in cantonese and mandarin. "Shu" and "shao" means small or little.

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monkeyu4 March 03, 2004

I've not tried this one yet,but just let you know SHU MAI is Chinese not Japanese.

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Andie H November 16, 2003
Shu Mai (Japanese Steamed Wontons)