Puyallup Fair Scones (Fisher Scones)

Total Time
30mins
Prep
15 mins
Cook
15 mins

First, these scones are quick, easy, great and a perfect project for a beginning baker. Second...you need to know how to pronounce Puyallup...I wouldn't want anyone to embarrass themselves!!..."Pew-allup", not Pooyloop!!...Here in Western Washington the Puyallup Fair is a huge annual event. It is one of the largest in the US. The fair is all about food for me! And Fisher Scones are the biggest draw...they sell something like 80,000 a day or something like that!! I have many fond memories of Fisher Scones. I found this recipe on-line, the poster said that she came across the recipe in a 1930's Fisher Cookbook her grandmother had. The original recipe called for raisins, but they no longer make them that way. The ONLY way to eat these is warm with a big slab of butter and raspberry jam, just like they serve them at the fair!! Store them in an air tight container and they keep well. They taste nice cold, but way better heated up in the microwave, and don't forget the butter and jam! FYI...Make sure you sift, then measure the flour per instructions. NOTE: I took this recipe and made some changes to it and I think this new recipe is even better Mrs. G's Fair Scones Mrs. G's Fair Scones...try them both and see what you think!

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Ingredients

Nutrition

Directions

  1. Sift and measure the flour.
  2. Re-sift with other dry ingredients.
  3. Work shortening into dry ingredients with the fingers.
  4. Add rasinins to flour-fat mixture and mix thoroughly (you may omit raisins).
  5. Add milk to mixture. (If you are omitting the raisins, add another 2 Tablespoons of milk).
  6. Turn out on to a floured board and divide into two equal pieces.
  7. Roll or pat each into a round and to the thickness of biscuits (3/4 inch to a full inch).
  8. Cut into wedge shaped pieces like a pie and bake about 15 minutes at 450 degrees on an ungreased baking sheet.
  9. To serve like they do at the fair; split open but do not cut clear through. Fill with jam and close.
  10. Eat and enjoy!
Most Helpful

5 5

These were very very very good! I made the recipe exactly as stated. Perfection. Light, fluffy and deeelish! I think there are a few key things working. The Double sifting. It really is important. When your shortening resembles peas (larger than the typical crumble) in the flour, it is time to add the milk.. and when everything holds together in a ball, it is the perfect time to roll out. (which really, you spend like 15 seconds rolling) I am from Washington State, but moved to Nova Scotia Canada about 6 years ago! Thanks for the memories. These come together in mere minutes! Much quicker than standing in line, which is WELL worth it!.

Been making these for years, though recently went gluten-free so I've had to update the recipe a little: for the flour, simply sub 3/4 c. tapioca starch, 3/4 c. sorghum flour, 1 c. white or brown rice flour, and 1 tsp. xanthan gum for the 2 1/2 c. all-purpose flour. They still come out flaky and delicious. Recently, I've tossed in 1 Tbsp. orange zest and 1/2 c. currants with great success.

5 5

These came out very tender and moist, the way a scone should be (people who think scones are supposed to be dense haven't ever had good ones). I didn't use the raisins, and I forgot the sugar, but with the raspberry jam the sugar wasn't needed. Thanks for posting!