Total Time
2hrs 40mins
Prep 2 hrs
Cook 40 mins

My sis Theresa turned me on to this recipe http://angiesrecipes.blogspot.com/2009/01/ubi-purple-yam-two-tone-bread.html Ubi, served as a potato dish as well as an ingredient, is the Filipino word for purple yam. Its flesh is a marbled violet color and is well-known for its aroma. Tangzhong starter / Water roux starter is a mixture of flour and water. NOT a sourdough starter. It keeps bread moist, soft and fluffier for a longer time period. The KEY to this starter is the temperature of the water used. The water and flour is mixed together than cooked at a 65 C/149 F temperature, the gluten within the flour absorbs all the water and become leavened. When this mixture is cooled and added to the remainder of the dough, the moisture is retained in the dough and heighten. Remove from heat and cover loosely with plastic wrap to prevent from drying. Store the starter in the refrigerator after after completely cooling down. To use the starter, measure out the amount called for in a recipe and let it warm to room temperature. Unlike sourdough starter, this special Tangzhong starter doesn't improve its flavour with age. So it's preferably to use up in 3 days. If it turns gray it went bad, discard it. Best to measure on a scale using the metric weights. If dough is wet do adjust with a touch of flour or dry with water. Take note the salt and yeast are 1/2 teaspoon each but grams are different.

Ingredients Nutrition

  • Tangzhong Starter

  • 50 g bread flour (1.75 ounces)
  • 250 ml water (1 cup)
  • Ubi Dough

  • 100 g bread flour (3 1/2 ounces)
  • 25 g powdered purple yams (7/8 ounce)
  • 18 g sugar (1 tablespoon 1/2 teaspoon)
  • 1 g salt (1/2 teaspoon)
  • 2 g instant dry yeast (1/2 teaspoon)
  • 40 g starter tangzhong water roux
  • 40 g warm milk (just under 1/4 cup)
  • 12 g eggs (1/2 ounce 1 tablespoon)
  • 15 g butter (1 tablespoon 1/2 ounce)
  • Light Dough

  • 125 g bread flour (almost 1 cup or 4 3/8 ounces)
  • 18 g sugar (5/8 ounce)
  • 1 g salt (1/2 teaspoon)
  • 2 g instant dry yeast (1/2 teaspoon)
  • 40 g starter tangzhong water roux
  • 40 g warm milk (just under 1/4 cup)
  • 12 g eggs (1/2 ounce 1 tablespoon)
  • 15 g butter (1 tablespoon)

Directions

  1. Starter:.
  2. In a bowl, whisk together the water and the flour until the mixture is well blended and lump free. Stir the mixture while it cooks over the medium heat to reach 65C/149°F It takes about 3-5 minutes. It will have a glue like texture.
  3. The key to this starter is the temperature of the water and flour is mixed together than cooked. At a 65 C/149 F temperature, the gluten within the flour absorbs all the water and become leavened. When this mixture is cooled and added to the remainder of the dough, the moisture is retained in the dough and heighten.
  4. Prepare the ubi dough by placing all the ingredients except butter in a mixing bowl. Mix with dough hook at slow speed for 1 minute. Switch the speed to medium and continue mixing until a dough forms. Add butter gradually and mix for approximately 5 minutes on medium speed until gluten is fully developed, i. e. elastic, smooth, non-sticky and leave from sides of mixing bowl. Prepare the light dough at the same way.
  5. Place the two doughs in two lightly greased plastic bags separately and let rise for about 45 minutes at the warm area. Once they are doubled in bulk, punch down and allow the doughs, covered, to rest on a lightly floured work surface for 10 minutes.
  6. Roll out each dough to a rectangle, about 22x10cm. Place purple taro dough atop the light and roll up tightly, beginning at short side. Place in a greased 26cm loaf pan. Cover and let rise till double in bulk, 45 to 60 minutes. Bake at 170C/340F for 30-35 minutes or until done. Remove from pan and let cool on a wire rack.