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    You are in: Home / Recipes / Our Daily Bread in a Crock - Weekly Make and Bake Rustic Bread Recipe
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    Our Daily Bread in a Crock - Weekly Make and Bake Rustic Bread

    Our Daily Bread in a Crock - Weekly Make and Bake Rustic Bread. Photo by PKG

    1/36 Photos of Our Daily Bread in a Crock - Weekly Make and Bake Rustic Bread

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    Total Time:

    Prep Time:

    Cook Time:

    336 hrs 30 mins

    336 hrs

    30 mins

    French Tart's Note:

    Make up a large batch of rustic artisanal bread dough, store it and then bake a loaf each day you need fresh bread, amazing but true! This is a hodge podge of old fashioned English and French rustic bread recipes; the bread dough is made up ahead of time and stored (in the old days) in an earthenware crock or bowl, with a lid. You tear a piece of the dough off as and when you want to bake a loaf of bread. Easy! I use this style of bread dough regularly in the B and B, so I can always have fresh bread or bread rolls on hand for breakfast. You can add other types of flour to the basic white batch, as long as the ratio remains the same - you can mix rye or wholewheat flour with the white, or add herbs, onions, seeds, fruit and other flavourings. The dough can be used as soon as the initial proving has finished, but it will keep in a cool place or a fridge for a week or two - I do not recommend longer than 2 weeks however. The dough can be used for free form bread loaves, in bread tins, as rolls or other shapes. I have kept this technique and recipe to myself for a while, but I have decided to share it on Zaar now, mainly as my daughter keeps asking for the basic dough recipe! I notice that this type of long-term or long-life bread dough has made a revival in a new book called “Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day”; this recipe however, is a very old technique and method, dough was always made up for the week and then kept in the cold room or pantry for daily baking. My grandmother who lived in a 600 year old cottage in Northern England, used to have a stone slab in the Pantry where she kept her crock and dough, I remember sticking my finger in it!! This amount makes about 4 to 5 loaves of bread, depending on the weight and shape of the bread that you bake.

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    Ingredients:

    Yield:

    Loaves ...

    Units: US | Metric

    Directions:

    1. 1
      Pour the warm water into a large mixing bowl - the water should be tepid or hand warm - NOT too hot, as it will kill the yeast.
    2. 2
      Add the yeast to the water and then the salt, mix well.
    3. 3
      Add ALL the flour and mix thoroughly with a wooden spoon or a dough hook until all the ingredients are amalgamated - NO need to over knead.
    4. 4
      Leave the bread dough in the mixing bowl and cover loosely - I use a shower cap to cover my dough! (That is NOT used as a shower cap anymore, I hasten to add!).
    5. 5
      Allow to prove for 2 hours, or until doubled in size.
    6. 6
      The dough can now be stored in the fridge or you can use the dough to make a loaf of bread immediately.
    7. 7
      If baking a loaf of bread now, pre-heat the oven and place a baking sheet or pizza tray in there. Tear off a large ball, about the size of a small melon, and knead it for about 1 minute with floured hands and on a floured board, Shape it as desired (Rolls, Boule, Baguette or Bannette) or place it in a greased and floured loaf tin. Allow to prove and rise for a further 20 to 30 minutes. Slash the surface with a sharp serrated knife if you wish, see photos. You can add a glaze or special finish at this point.
    8. 8
      Bake at 225C/450F for 30 minutes or until well risen, brown and the loaf sounds hollow when it is tapped on the underside. (If you wish, you can add a bowl of boiling water as soon as you put the bread into the oven – this steams and bakes the loaf to give a good chewy texture and keeps the inside moist.).
    9. 9
      Remove the bread when baked and cool on a cooling rack. Serve warm with butter, cheese, jam, hams and cold cuts, or slice when cool for sandwiches. Also wonderful when toasted the next day.
    10. 10
      Store the excess dough in the mixing bowl, loosely covered, in the fridge or somewhere cool until needed – this will keep for 2 weeks, but I find it has all gone by 7 to 10 days! This amount of dough will make between 4 and 5 loaves of bread, depending on the shape and amount of dough you use.

    Ratings & Reviews:

    • on June 28, 2010

      55

      This has become a staple in my house. I usually only make enough for one loaf and make two small loaves out of it since it's only me and my DH. I use a bit of brown sugar to activate my yeast and leave the dough out overnight to give it a light sourdough flavor before baking it up the next morning.

      people found this review Helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No
    • on May 23, 2010

      55

      I use this recipe twice a week. I've tried many bread recipes and while they were all good, this one is great. It has a terrific spongy texture that we love. And best of all, we have cut most sugar out of our diets for my daughters ADD, and this recipe fits the bill. You cant even tell there isnt any sugar in it, its so good. Thanks! UPDATE: I made this bread first few times with the steam pan method. And then i got lazy and just used a spray bottle to mist the top of the bread just before putting in the oven. I saw no difference in the texture of the dough. It worked great. I have also subbed 1/4 cup Whey Protien Powder for 1/4 cup of the flower to add protein to the bread, and there was no change to the texture taste or moisture level. Still wonderful

      people found this review Helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No
    • on April 24, 2010

      55

      Wow! I am enjoying this recipe so much. I have done this countless times now, and have tweaked it a bit to get it to work for me. At first I was having a hard time getting it to rise after coming out of the fridge, so I tried rising it for 2 hours in the oven with the light on. That seems to work well. Also, I add a bit more yeast then called for, as that seems to help the rising too. Also I add 3tsp of sugar when I am adding the salt. I find this rounds out the flavour a bit. I have done this with a mix of white and whole wheat bread flour, as well as just all whole wheat, which I think I like better. I also found that baking it at 450 was giving me loaves that were a bit too crusty for my liking, so I have been baking mine at 350 for 25 mins, and I find that they are perfect! I have also used this as a pizza dough with great success! I rolled it thin with a rolling pin and brushed it with olive oil, and baked for 7 mins, then added sauce and toppings and put it back in the oven until done. It is amazing to have bread/pizza dough in the fridge all the time ready to go when I am. Thank you so much for posting this. I hardly buy bread anymore, so this recipe is also a big money saver, as well as being fun and easy!! I would recommend this to anybody....it is quick, easy and great!!

      people found this review Helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No

    Read All Reviews (105)

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    Nutritional Facts for Our Daily Bread in a Crock - Weekly Make and Bake Rustic Bread

    Serving Size: 1 (1525 g)

    Servings Per Recipe: 1

    Amount Per Serving
    % Daily Value
    Calories 727.8
     
    Calories from Fat 18
    54%
    Total Fat 2.0 g
    3%
    Saturated Fat 0.3 g
    1%
    Cholesterol 0.0 mg
    0%
    Sodium 1463.4 mg
    60%
    Total Carbohydrate 152.1 g
    50%
    Dietary Fiber 5.7 g
    23%
    Sugars 0.5 g
    2%
    Protein 21.1 g
    42%

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