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    You are in: Home / Recipes / Old Widow Walker's Ziploc Omelettes Recipe
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    Old Widow Walker's Ziploc Omelettes

    Old Widow Walker's Ziploc Omelettes. Photo by ~Leslie~

    1/24 Photos of Old Widow Walker's Ziploc Omelettes

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    Total Time:

    Prep Time:

    Cook Time:

    33 mins

    20 mins

    13 mins

    Pot Scrubber's Note:

    Mrs. Walker was my Sunday school teacher and we used to do this in the church kitchen, occasionally. This is my first memory of cooking that I cherish to this day. She keeps her age a closely guarded secret but is rumoured to be 115+ years old and perhaps, immortal. She has out lived three husbands and four children. She is still sharp as the Bowie knife she carries in her purse. I don't know why she carries a Bowie knife in her purse- but she always has. I asked her about it years ago and she said, "You would be surprised how often it comes in handy, Honey." I suppose it does, Mrs. Walker. God bless you. BTW- she is thrilled that I want to pass this on to another generation of schoolchildren. She was surprised that I remembered doing this with her over 35 years ago and was touched. When asked how to do it- she rattled off the instructions faster than I could write! I've eaten this bag-n-boil recipe for 40+ years with no toxicity what-so-ever, obviously. If it was toxic... I would be in too poor of health to type. Google the topic for yourself and make your own judgment. The danger is greatly exaggerated.

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    Ingredients:

    Serves: 5

    Yield:

    omelettes

    Units: US | Metric

    Directions:

    1. 1
      Have children write their name on a quart-size ziploc freezer bag with permanent marker.
    2. 2
      Crack 2 eggs (large or extra-large) into the bag (not more than 2) shake to combine them.
    3. 3
      Put out a variety of ingredients such as: cheeses, ham, bacon, onion, green pepper, tomato, hash browns, etc.
    4. 4
      Each child adds prepared ingredients of choice to their bag and shake. Make sure to get the air out of the bag and zip it up.
    5. 5
      Place the bags into rolling, boiling water for exactly 13 minutes. You can usually cook 6-8 omelettes in a large pot. For more, make another pot of boiling water.
    6. 6
      Open the bags and the omelette will roll out easily.
    7. 7
      Be prepared for children to squeal with delight at their first meal they have cooked. A lifetime memory has just been served.
    8. 8
      Note: I had to fill in SOMETHING regarding cooking time, serving sizes, and amounts. This of course, depends on your situation and how carnivorous the kiddies are. I've tried to guestimate for five servings.

    Ratings & Reviews:

    • on August 17, 2009

      55

      Thank you so much for this wonderful recipe! The kids (ages 4 & 7) made omelettes with us this past weekend and had a blast. I was looking for a way to get them to eat eggs (aside from hardboiled egg whites) and maybe try a few new foods. Our spread included diced tomatoes, onions, red bell pepper, mushrooms, grated cheddar cheese and crumbled bacon. Using permanent marker (and supervision) we had the oldest write our names on each of the ziplock bags while the youngest counted and handed us two eggs at a time for each omlette. Both made their own omelettes as well as ours (we told them what items we wanted). Our 7 year old stuck with lots of cheese and bacon while our 4 year old surprised us by adding in cheese, bacon, tomato and even at the protest of her older sibling... Onion! The cooked omelettes slid out of the ziploc bags with ease and not only did they look impressive (better than any pan cooked omelette I've made in awhile), they tasted great too! Both of our kids ate their omelettes exclaiming that theirs tasted 'better' then the other, because... they made it :). I found it unnecessary to add milk to keep the eggs moist, they were plenty moist and fluffy on their own. Just a few notes I'd like to add of my own: I did most of the prep work the evening before to save time and placed everything in their own small tupperware container. Going forward, we will use diced ham instead of bacon - it's just easier and there's less work involved. I'll be dicing left over vegetables from other meals to keep in the freezer that we can use later on in our 'omelettes". I always seem to have that extra half an onion or crown of brocoli that doesn't get used but sits in the fridge past its prime - just seems like an easy way to use them up. Regarding cooking in Ziploc bags - it's safe. Ziploc does not use BPA in it's plastic products and they are also Dioxin free. The emails circulating claiming that Ziploc's own site warns against cooking in their storage bags are false (I checked their site to confirm if this was true and found that Ziploc addresses that email as 'misleading' and goes on to explain the criteria needed in order to form dioxide - neither of which is likely to happen from your microwave or boiling in water since you need the combinations of both chloride and temperatures of 1,500 deg F). Just be sure to keep an eye on the bags and try and keep them away from touch the sides of the pan during cooking. Our bags held up just fine, no melting or softening of the plastic. Water also does not need to be at a rolling boil to cook in. Turn it down to medium heat before adding the ziploc bags.

      people found this review Helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No
    • on February 26, 2010

      55

      We love these - whether cooking one omelet, or setting out an "omelet bar" and allowing guests to design their own. As to the danger in using Ziploc bags, that is an URBAN LEGEND. If you are still worried, now you can buy SC Johnson's Zip and Steam bags, made specifically for cooking foods.

      people found this review Helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No
    • on December 20, 2009

      15

      THIS IS VERY DANGEROUS TO YOUR HEALTH! BEWARE! On ziploc's website they DO NOT RECOMMEND cooking ANYTHING in ziploc bags!!! In fact, there have been many health warnings about cooking food in plastic, and ziploc bags were not designed for food to be cooked in them. The plastic from the bags leeches into your food and you are essentially eating plastic. Plastic toxicity is one of the many causes of illnesses of diseases such as cancer.

      people found this review Helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No

    Read All Reviews (133)

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    Nutritional Facts for Old Widow Walker's Ziploc Omelettes

    Serving Size: 1 (269 g)

    Servings Per Recipe: 5

    Amount Per Serving
    % Daily Value
    Calories 554.8
     
    Calories from Fat 351
    63%
    Total Fat 39.1 g
    60%
    Saturated Fat 15.5 g
    77%
    Cholesterol 435.0 mg
    145%
    Sodium 1351.5 mg
    56%
    Total Carbohydrate 17.0 g
    5%
    Dietary Fiber 1.4 g
    5%
    Sugars 1.7 g
    7%
    Protein 32.2 g
    64%

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