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Unfortunately, I disagree with CarolynneM about this chowder. I lived in Boston for many years, too, and this recipe doesn't cut it. It is a waste of expensive seafood. The chowder comes out overly thick and floury tasting and overpowers the delicate flavors of the lobster and scallops. I remember a wonderful seafood chowder I ate in the early 80s in Braintree or Quincy that was the epitome of what a good seafood chowder should be--the delicate, sweet flavors of the seafood were primary in a mildly flavored liquid akin to half-n-half; I do not recall any potatoes in this wonderful chowder with chunks of lobster, scallops, and fish. Problems with the posted recipe are many. Why two pounds of cod? The recipe says to cook it in two cups of fish broth, remove them both from the pan separately, then never returns with what to do with the fish. Omit the fish at this point. This chowder is over-thickened with a roux that still tastes floury after four minutes of cooking it. The recipe then says to add the reserved fish broth to the roux, followed by the potatoes which are to be cooked in the thickened broth. First, I had to add several cups of water to the thickened broth so I could cook the potatoes--which took more than 8-10 minutes. The recipe needs four cups of fish broth, not two. Cut the flour from a half cup to no more than a quarter cup. Add a half pound of fish chunks later in the recipe, perhaps with the shrimp and scallops. Substitute corn for the potatoes. This is at least a start at fixing this recipe.

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leooregon March 31, 2014
New England Seafood Chowder - the Real Deal