8 Reviews

OK, so my family also calls this "bosch" but I suppose it is borscht. But, now I see it is actually just Easter soup according to the immigrants polish cookbook and this website!!! We cook the soup with the sausage and let sit overnight. The eggs are hardboilded and decorated. We then put the eggs in when we sit down to eat. Great traditions, keep them going.

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mkge_6147865 April 19, 2014

This is almost the same way I make it. I learned it from my ex-husband polish grandmother. The differences are:
1)She slow simmers the keilbasa in water for about 1.5 hours, she then removes it, removes the skin & then slices it.
2)She adds the diced potatoes to the broth & cooks until fork tender.
3)She boils 12-14 eggs in a seperate pan. She removes the yolk from two of the eggs & puts the yolks in a small bowl, then she adds some of the broth to the yolks & mixes well. Then she adds it back to the broth. She slices the whites & adds them to the soup broth. She slices remaining eggs & adds that to the soup broth. Then she adds the keilbasa to the soup broth.

She never thickened it with flour, it does get a little texture from boiling the potatoes in the broth though. Other than that, this recipe is almost exactly the same. The amount of vinegar you add depends on how sour you like it! you can always put the vinegar on the table & let the person add more if desired...great recipe either way!

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agathadoe April 28, 2011

Exactly like what my Polish grandma used to make. Only difference is that we grated horseradish root directly into the soup. We call it 'borsct', too.

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jeanmarieok July 10, 2010

OMG, I have been looking for this recipe for 20 years! My Polish grandmother used to make this, but she would add cooked beef, cream and horseradish. Thank you so much for helping me keep the tradition!

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arynne92 April 11, 2010

Hey Nana, I hate to be the Polish kid who's actually geeky enough to solve this mystery - what most people refer to as borscht is beet boscht. This is bialy barszcz - white borscht, also known as zurek. It's far more delicious, is a bit less well-known - while they make beet borscht all over Eastern Europe, this is mainly a southern Polish thing. Thanks for sharing this - my family is from central Poland, but I have a cousin who moved south who made this for us. I'm looking forward to perfecting my own version and yours is a good place to start!

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ClarenceKitchenDiva March 03, 2009

My family refers to this as borscht as well! We make it in ham broth but otherwise it's the same. Great recipe!

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lindsey21412 January 21, 2008

This tastes like the borscht my late father-in-law made every Easter, but he was never one to share his recipes. I loved it, however I did skip the dollop of horseradish. It tasted even better reheated the next day. Thank you so much for sharing the recipe.

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ElaineAnn May 22, 2006

I love this recipe! I make it every Easter to follow my Polish family tradition! I just want to say that I have always called it borscht, too! :) I add mashed pickled beets to the horseradish for extra flavor. YUMMY! Absolutely SMACZNE!

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twyss508 April 16, 2006
My Polish(Easter) Kielbasa Soup