Muxi Rou (Chinese Mushu Pork)

READY IN: 1hr
Recipe by Kate S.

True Mushu Pork has to have wood ears. My favorite restaurant version, from Hong Dou Yuan in Kunming, also includes fresh cilantro. I guess they don't clean the cilantro well, because it makes me sick every time, but I keep on ordering it anyway. Yum.

Top Review by mianbao

This recipe provided us with a truly delicious dinner last night. Although I had all the ingredients in my kitchen, the actual cooking needed concentration to add how much of which flavorings when. On the other hand, following the detailed recipe, a wonderful dish was produced. I am sure if I make it more often, my performance in the kitchen will be smoother. Thank you very much for sharing this excellent recipe with us.

Ingredients Nutrition

  • 12 ounce dried wood ear mushrooms
  • 12 lb boneless pork loin
  • 34 teaspoon salt (added 1/4 t at a time, see recipe instructions)
  • 34 teaspoon sugar (added in two parts, see instructions)
  • 5 teaspoons soy sauce (added in two stages, see instructions)
  • 18 teaspoon white pepper
  • 2 teaspoons shaoxing wine (added in 2 stages, see instructions)
  • 1 teaspoon cornstarch
  • 1 tablespoon water
  • 8 tablespoons peanut oil (added a little bit at a time, see instructions) or 8 tablespoons canola oil (added a little bit at a time, see instructions)
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 -2 garlic clove, smashed and sliced (optional)
  • 3 -4 large scallions, sliced diagonally, white and green parts kept separate
  • 2 teaspoons sesame oil
  • 12 cup fresh cilantro, washed and chopped (optional)
  • Mandarin pancake (optional)

Directions

  1. Soak wood ears in boiling water for 20-60 minutes, then drain and squeeze out excess water, and slice julienne.
  2. Freeze the pork loin for 20-30 minutes to firm up a little bit, then slice very thin, then stack the slices and julienne.
  3. Combine 1/4 t salt, 1/2 t sugar, 2 t soy sauce, 6 turns white pepper mill, 1 t wine, 1 t cornstarch, and 1 T water for the marinade. Add to the pork and stir to coat.
  4. Marinate meat for about 20 minutes, then stir in 1 T oil.
  5. Beat the eggs lightly with 1 T oil and 1/4 t salt.
  6. Heat a wok over high heat until smoke rises. Add 1 T oil and swirl it around. Add the wood ears and stir for 30 seconds. Season with 1/4 t salt, 1/4 T sugar, and 1 T soy sauce. Transfer to warm dish and set aside.
  7. Reheat the wok until smoking. Add 2 T oil and swirl it around. Pour in the egg and scramble lightly. Set aside on warm plate.
  8. Scrape wok clean, washing if necessary.
  9. Reheat wok until smoke rises. Add 3 T oil and swirl around. Add the garlic and stir a moment until fragrant. Add the white part of the scallions, toss and allow to sizzle for a few moments. Add the pork and stir-fry for about a minute until color changes. Add 1 t wine around the side of the wok, continuing to stir-fry. Add wood ears and eggs to the wok, stirring for another minute until pork and egg are thoroughly cooked and all ingredients are hot.
  10. Serving option 1: After removing wok from heat, toss in green onion parts and fresh cilantro, drizzle with sesame oil, and serve with rice.
  11. Serving option 2: After removing wok from heat, drizzle with sesame oil. Serve meat on one platter, mandarin pancakes on another, and green onions and cilantro in a third dish. At the table people may pick up a pancake, and use their chopsticks to stuff the pancake with meat and top with green onions and cilantro.
  12. Serves 2 as the main dish, or up to 10 as part of a full Chinese meal.

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