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    You are in: Home / Recipes / Moose Nose Recipe
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    Moose Nose

    Total Time:

    Prep Time:

    Cook Time:

    6 hrs

    2 hrs

    4 hrs

    fraxinus's Note:

    A traditional Cree dish (Canadian Plains Indians) this is the only recipe that I have been able to find. I hope others will have information on Moose Nose as well.

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    Ingredients:

    Servings:

    Units: US | Metric

    Directions:

    1. 1
      Place nose in large pot -- hide, hair and all!
    2. 2
      Boil for 2 hours.
    3. 3
      Don't look in the pot during cooking.
    4. 4
      Cool dish down until you can handle it, then skin the nose without fainting.
    5. 5
      Discard the hide. Wash the nose in cold water. Place the nose in a pot of clean, cold water. Add salt & pepper to your taste, bay leaves, and onions. Boil until tender.
    6. 6
      Chill and serve sliced on crackers with a smear of cream cheese.

    Ratings & Reviews:

    • on December 01, 2012

      not sure how to post a recipe on this site but the only way I have seen and have prepared moose nose (mountain Cree). This task is not as disturbing as this post alludes, it is far less involved than cleaning a fish or a bird.
      #1 singe the hair on the nose over an fire and then scrape the hair off with a sharp knife, continue until all hair is removed and the nose is white.
      there are now two options:
      Traditional method: cube the nose into a pot of water and cook for 2-3 hours strain the cooked pieces, salt to taste and serve with a side dish (nose meat was usually drained and salted and we carried it around in a paper bag for lunch or snack when i was young). alternatively just add vegetables to the broth with the nose meast to make a soup.
      Not so traditional method as First Nations did not have access to vinegar, flour or cornstarch: soak the freshly cleaned nose overnight in hot water with 2 tblsp salt and 1/2 cup vinegar, the next day drain and put in clean water, scrub the nose, rinse and cube. Serve lightly salted or prepare as a soup adding onion and a selection of root vegetables to the nose and cook until vegetables are done. Mix flour and a bit of cornstarch with water and add to the the pot in order to thicken the broth. Simmer for 10 min. Add water to thin the soup as desired.
      I personally prefer the Traditional method as it retains the flavour of the smoke from the fire, birch or alder is preferred although pine or spruce have a nice smokey flavour, while poplar can be a bit strong. Nose meat has a very interesting texture, i have had nothing else like it and miss the flavour, texture, maybe mostly the memories of hunting trips with my family laughing around a fire, drinking muskeg tea, the smell and sound of singed hair, meat and mosquitos.

      people found this review Helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No
    • on September 02, 2011

      35

      I'm Mi'kmaq from New Brunswick and I survived this dish , too. Actually, I really like it. The only thing my Mum did was to fry the nose in margarine after the first boil and then fry onion and garlic(2). MmMm, nose !

      people found this review Helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No
    • on August 02, 2006

      25

      My mother and her family of Ojibway roots have also boiled up a moose nose on a successful hunt and I have tasted it and I'm still here. Tonge is also another boiled dish they do and I must admit as a young young girl, I often requested one for my bd gift from from grandpa since my bd was during the hunting season.

      people found this review Helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No

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    Nutritional Facts for Moose Nose

    Serving Size: 1 (0 g)

    Servings Per Recipe: 6

    Amount Per Serving
    % Daily Value
    Calories 0.0
     
    Calories from Fat 0
    %
    Total Fat 0.0 g
    0%
    Saturated Fat 0.0 g
    0%
    Cholesterol 0.0 mg
    0%
    Sodium 0.0 mg
    0%
    Total Carbohydrate 0.0 g
    0%
    Dietary Fiber 0.0 g
    0%
    Sugars 0.0 g
    0%
    Protein 0.0 g
    0%

    The following items or measurements are not included:

    moose nose

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