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Ty anyone who has ever been intimidated by preparing fish: Try this recipe! It was super easy to prepare and the flavor is outstanding, probably better than you've had at most restaurants. I used haddock with fantastic results. You can probably use almost any fish you would like. The only other change I made was to reduce butter by half and when I make it again I will do the same, because I can't imagine this fish tasting any better than it did. What I also love about this recipe is that it's easy to do for a dinner party. I can prepare it in advance and then just pop it in the oven. I can't wait to serve it to my friends. Thank you very much!

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Katanashrp March 03, 2011

This was the first time cooking monkfish for me. The recipe works perfectly for this fish. In fact you can even eliminate the wine if you like. The fish has almost a lobster texture and flavor, so you need only enhance the already delicate flavor slightly. I bought the fish fresh and already filleted, but one side had a thin, tough membrane attached. I don't know if it was necessary, but I removed the membrane. This is a densely fleshed fish, so it won't flake easily like some others. Be careful to not overcook it, expecting it to flake apart when done. I pan roasted mine by frying the fillets on one side in a cast iron skillet and then turning the fish over and placing the pan in a pre-heated 425 degree F oven. The two fillets I had were done in less than ten minutes after placing the skillet in the oven. Monkfish is similar to wolfish, which I also like very much. I will purchase either of these fishes if I can find them fresh. I have no idea what they would be like frozen.

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Dean S. June 21, 2015

This was easy to make, delicious and lovely. You can't go wrong with this recipe

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Anonymous June 16, 2015

The recipe sounds delicious. This is not exactly about this recipe. Rather, please let me pose a question. Is Monk fish supposed to smell and taste like the floor of a turkey barn? I bought one. I think it was not spoiled. It didn't smell like rotting fish. It smelled like my 4th grade gym teacher's sneakers must have. I cooked it up anyhow using a recipe basically like this one. By the time I took it out of the heat I found it necessary to open all the windows and doors in my house. Let me be very clear. This not a reflection on the recipe. It is a warning or question that Monk fish might be an acquired taste. I did taste it. It was an experience I wont forget. I have been trying to forget it. Eventually, it will probably be OK because we all learned in Psyche 101 that we forget bad things pretty fast. I hope so. After discarding the cooked Monk fish I prepared a beef steak on the same butcher block where I had skinned the fish. I had cleaned the block after the fish, but not enough. The steak had the same indescribable flavor infused through it. I offered it to my Poodle, and she looked at me like I had tried to poison her. Good luck with Monk fish. Don't take my experience as typical. Ask around. But you probably should make very sure they are VERY fresh, and smell them very carefully before you take them home. If you get a touch of apprehension, put it back and buy a catfish.

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Anonymous May 12, 2015

This was very good, I almost wanted a little "more" flavor (garlic or Old Bay, maybe?). I used Mahi Mahi filets (they're one of our favorite fish varieties).I would make it again, and perhaps add some more seasoning. Ease of preparation held an additional star. I actually placed fresh asparagus spears alongside the fish and cooked them together. Served with spinach cheese tortellini alfredo. Thanks for sharing.

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Larawithoutau September 05, 2014

Thanks, really enjoyed your recipe and it was very easy to make. :)

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littlecat58 March 01, 2013

I wanted to saute something instead of broil, but I liked this recipe. I used it as my inspiration, with the following modifications:

Chop up the fish into 1-2 inch cubes. Pour double the wine and lemon into a bowl. Add parsley to the bowl. Add salt and pepper to the bowl. Add 1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil to the bowl. Now, add all the fish into the bowl, and use hands to cover the fish with this mixture.

Add half the amount of butter as the recipe calls for into a large saute pan, and for the remaining amount, use canola or olive oil. Heat the skillet to high. Add the entire bowl to this pan. Allow fish to cook on high head for 1.5 min, and then flip over. Wait 1.5 min on this side as well, and then use a spatula to mix the fish with the entire mixture in the pan. Remove fish from the pan (draining any excess fluid) and put onto a plate. Turn the heat as high as it will go, and allow the remaining mixture to thicken. Once it is of a mayonnaise-like consistency, separate the brown sauce from the remaining oil, and use a spoon to put some on top of the fish on the plate. Serve this way.

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dallasstar3 July 07, 2012

Loved it. I also reduced the butter. It came out absolutely delicious.

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Evcha November 16, 2011

Very good recipe, best monk fish i have ever had! .... and very easy to make

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lester_byrne May 21, 2008
Monkfish in Lemon Butter Wine Sauce