Lemon-Cheese Souffle With Lemon-Ginger Sauce

Total Time
50mins
Prep 15 mins
Cook 35 mins

This is a light and lemony dessert with a great zingy sauce!

Ingredients Nutrition

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Lightly coat a 6-cup souffle dish with nonstick cooking spray. Sprinkle with the 1 tablespoon confectioner's sugar to coat the dish.
  2. Put the cottage cheese, sugar, egg yolks, and lemon rind in a blender. Process 1 minute until well blended.
  3. In a medium bowl, beat lemon juice and egg whites until soft peaks form. Gradually beat in 1/3 cup confectioner's sugar until stiff glossy peaks form.
  4. Put 1 cup of the beaten egg whites in the blender with the cheese mixture. Process until blended.
  5. Pour cheese mixture into bowl with egg whites and carefully fold in just until combined. Pour into the prepared souffle dish.
  6. Place the souffle dish in a pan just big enough to hold it. Fill the pan with hot water to come halfway up the side of the souffle dish. Bake at 350 for 35 minutes.
  7. While souffle is baking, make the sauce: Combine 1 1/4 cups water, sugar, lemon juice, lemon rind, and ginger in a small saucepan. Bring to boiling over medium heat.
  8. Dissolve cornstarch in 2 tablespoons water until blended. Stir into lemon sauce mixture. Boil 1 minute.
Most Helpful

1 5

I agree with the other reviewer that the sauce was tasty and a little thin. It was actually quite unappetizing looking. The souffle, on the other hand, was a complete disaster. Baking it in another pan with hot water prevented it from cooking through on the bottom.

5 5

I borrowed the sauce for a gingerbread I was making. I didn't actually make the souffle, although I'm sure it's good. But the sauce was wonderful! I was a little shy of a whole tablespoon of lemon zest, as my gingerbread called for a teaspoon, but I had an extra tablespoon of juice from my 2 lemons, so I threw it in. It had a perfectly lemony flavor, and the touch of ginger was very nice. I did use an extra half-tablespoon of cornstarch. I couldn't wait for it to cool, and it seemed a little thin. (The leftover sauce will probably thicken up quite nicely in the fridge.)

I felt compelled to add a dash of salt. (I salt practically everything.) And at the end, I stirred in 2 T. of butter for a velvety finish. It was already good without it, but butter adds a little extra something to the texture.

I loved the method of bringing everything to a boil and then adding the cornstarch. Like making a simple syrup, it allowed the sugar to dissolve into the liquid, and allowed me the chance to correct any flovors that might not have been right, which, of course, there weren't.

Maybe someday, I'll make the souffle. As soon as I get a souffle dish.