Indian Pudding--Eggless

READY IN: 3hrs 30mins
Recipe by The_Swedish_Chef

When a recipe is SO old, with each cook that makes it, they add their version to the mix and the world ends up with 1000 versions of a dish from a 1000 different chefs! I grew up on the wild prairies of Minnesota with Grandparents who lived in the 1890's. Store bought food was scarce so you used what you could grow or barter. This dish originated in the early 1600's from what was available: molasses, milk, and cornmeal. White sugar and eggs were expensive luxuries that didn't exist for most people and weren't added to the original recipe until many decades later, when both eggs and white sugar became common and inexpensive to "waste" on an inexpensive dish. This is a dense and soft cornmeal "mush" pudding, that bakes in a very slow oven and IS NOT STIRRED! I've never seen another recipe that used as much cornmeal, which is why this one is so tasty. Many reviewers of other recipes complain that "you can't taste any corn flavour." If you don't like molasses, maple syrup can be used and that would make it a New England Indian Pudding. This is great on a cold Winter day with a cold glass of buttermilk or steaming cup of coffee and is equally good the next morning, served for breakfast with a nice side of bacon or ham. Enjoy!

Top Review by Cupcake-Princess

I made this recipe for the Spring 2010 PAC. This was a very unique old fashioned pudding that had a great molasses maple spice flavor. Since I only had black strap molasses, which are to intense, I used 1/3 maple syrup and 1/3 of the black strap molasses for the full 2/3 cups of molasses. I served the warm pudding with vanilla ice cream. This recipe is perfect for cold days. The only problem was that it took 3 hours to bake and I had a hard time waiting that long! :)

Ingredients Nutrition

Directions

  1. Heat oven to 300 degrees.
  2. Grease a 2 quart casserole. Set aside.
  3. Mix the cornmeal, sugar (or maple syrup), salt, cinnamon and ginger together. Set aside.
  4. Heat the first 3 cups of milk and molasses slowly until scalded.
  5. Gradually stir the cornmeal-sugar mixture into the hot milk/molasses mixture. When combined, add the butter. Cook over low heat, stirring constantly, about 10-20 minutes or until the cornmeal mush begins to thicken slightly.
  6. Boil water to create a water bath (Bain Marie) for the casserole dish.
  7. Pour into greased casserole. Place casserole in a baking pan deep enough to hold enough boiling water to come 2 inches up the side. Fill baking pan with boiling water.
  8. Pour the remaining 1 cup of cold milk over the pudding; DO NOT STIR!
  9. Bake for 3 hours or until a knife inserted of the center of the pudding comes out clean.
  10. Carefully remove pudding from oven so water from baking pan does not spill. Set on trivet or hot pad to cool for 10-15 minutes before serving. Allow water to cool in oven for safe removal.
  11. Serve Indian Pudding alone, with ice cream, poured cream or whipped cream.

Join the Conversation

  • all
  • reviews
  • tweaks
  • q & a