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    You are in: Home / Recipes / Hungarian Goulash Recipe
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    Hungarian Goulash

    Average Rating:

    17 Total Reviews

    Showing 1-17 of 17

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    • on December 07, 2003

      I'm glad you posted this one. I've probably been making this recipe since the 70's, and it's hard to beat. I've tried more "authentic" recipes, but the family keeps asking for this one. I modify it just a bit now - using only 2 tbsp canola oil instead of shortening, and just one tsp of salt instead of two. Hungarian paprika is our favorite kind. I also like to use the pressure cooker, which improves the flavor.

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    • on May 21, 2011

      We enjoyed this dish, but I would definitely exclude the sugar next time. I cut the amount in half and it was still too sweet. Otherwise we thought it was a really nice dish. Thanks!

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    • on October 23, 2010

      I never tried this recipe, but if you would like a true hungarian goulash recipe like it is made in the hungarian neighborhood of South Bend IN. here it is .Brown stew meat cut into one inch squares in about two tablespoons of olive oil. do this in batches so your browning in oil not meat juices, you will need at least two and a half to three pounds. when all of the meat is browned add one medium chopped onion and cook with all the good flavers that have been cooked on the bottom, cook to tender then add one tablespoon garlic cook about two minutes.Add enough water to cover add more if needed to maintain the proper level , now here is where the flavor comes in ,you will need true hungarian paprika no other paprika will do. i use Budapest's Best sweet delicate brand its in the seasons isle. put about two or three tablespoons or to taste . simmer until meat is tender,about one to two hours. take four russet potatoes cut into bite size cubes and add to soup simmer just long enough so that the potatoes are done. then stop cooking or the potatoes will get mushy.Next find a hard crusted bread like a bagget slice a piece of bread add some butter and dip it into the juice and enjoy . I hope that you print this recipe as it is the truest hungarian recipe that there is.

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    • on February 09, 2014

      I have made this recipe for over 30 years...I serve it with noodles...I also add more catsup than the recipe calls for ..but it one of my family's comfort foods, and am glad that I was able to find it online..

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    • on May 17, 2010

      Very good! Initially I used homemade beef stock rather than water. I then had to add water every now and then as it cooked. Next time, I'll start with water instead of the stock. My neighbor (who often eats with me) immediately detected the sugar in it (even though I didn't even add the full tablespoon). He does NOT like sugar in meat dishes, so I'll skip the sugar next time, too. Really a great dish, though. Served it over little curly-q noodles.

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    • on April 28, 2009

      I give this 5 stars because my family thought it was good. I personally thought it was missing something. I wanted it to be spicier? or something else. I might search diff recipes to see how they differ. My brother in law said he thought it would be better over rice (we had it over buttered egg noodles). Thanks for the recipe and I am glad I tried it.

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    • on August 05, 2008

      My family just loves this recipe! This is the one meal that my twin three year olds scarf down with no complaints. They both just ate two whole bowls of it! It is a very inexpensive meal, as well - great for a family on a tight budget.

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    • on August 04, 2008

      I appreciate you posting this recipe. I know that its not "authentic" as "authentic hungarian" goes. But its authentic to me and my family. My stepfathers aunt made hungarian goulash for me many years ago and I have been wanting to recreate it ever since. This particular recipe is so darn close I call good. This dish never fails to please and I always have to make large quantities. A single batch is never enough. If there are leftovers, which doesnt happen often, they dont make it past the second day.

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    • on March 30, 2008

      Delicious! Family loved it! I followed the recipe exactly, and I can't imagine the flavor being improved upon. I froze the leftovers in a 7 x 11 baking dish. After thawing overnight in the refrigerator, I baked it (covered) at 350 for about 35 minutes, until heated through. Still as flavorful as ever.

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    • on December 27, 2007

      THANK YOU!!! This is one of my favorite foods and my mom would always make for my birthday because I loved it so much. I lost the recipe about 15 years ago. All I could remember was it had beef stew meat, worcestershire, used cornstarch to thicken and was served over wide egg noodles. I had no idea what else was in it so I couldn't even experiment. All the other goulash recipes I'd find online are either chili mac or had sour cream. Ick. I used butter this time to brown the meat. I can't handle cayenne and didn't add that. I put in about a tablespoon of cornstarch to thicken before serving. That may have not been enough because I seem to remember it being thicker and more gelatinous than it turned out this time. Other than that I followed the recipe and it had the same flavor I remember. So yummy. Thank you so much.

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    • on October 28, 2007

      Delicious! Been making this Betty Crocker favorite for years...I use beef for stew. My recipe calls for 3/4 cup catsup instead of 1/4 cup, and I reduce the salt to 1 teaspoon. Good served with a dollop of sour cream and a sprinkling of fresh parsley, too. Thanks for posting!

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    • on September 25, 2007

      Excellent recipe! I browned the beef in butter, I added a bit less water, and threw in some green pepper and mushrooms. Instead of the flour & water as thickener, I used a dollup of sour cream. Fabulous!

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    • on October 02, 2006

      I have used this recipe for years...it is the best...I have made this in my crockpot and it work really well....

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    • on February 02, 2005

      I used about 1 1/2 lbs of beef round steak...(more gravy for the noodles!) and used canola oil rather than the shortening. I also cut down on the brown sugar and onion; families personal preferences. This would work well served over mashed potatoes too. Very easy, thank you!

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    • on June 28, 2004

      I used canola oil to brown the meat, the beef cut I used was cross cut blade. Great flavours and extremely tender meat. Very popular with the family and I will make this again and again...I give it 10 stars!

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    • on March 20, 2004

      To heck with authenticity, this was very good! I followed the recipe exactly, with the exception of one minor change (I used canola oil instead of shortening to brown the beef) and one substantial change: I used Hungarian sweet smoked paprika instead of the ordinary paprika. It was delicious! This was both easy and straightforward to prepare, and made for a simple dinner served with buttered egg noodles and steamed broccoli. I will definitely be making this again.

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    • on September 08, 2003

      I have loved this recipe for years; this Betty Crocker recipe is by far the best!!

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    Nutritional Facts for Hungarian Goulash

    Serving Size: 1 (269 g)

    Servings Per Recipe: 6

    Amount Per Serving
    % Daily Value
    Calories 577.5
     
    Calories from Fat 326
    56%
    Total Fat 36.2 g
    55%
    Saturated Fat 12.8 g
    64%
    Cholesterol 127.5 mg
    42%
    Sodium 1036.7 mg
    43%
    Total Carbohydrate 31.1 g
    10%
    Dietary Fiber 1.8 g
    7%
    Sugars 6.6 g
    26%
    Protein 30.8 g
    61%

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