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    You are in: Home / Recipes / Homemade Stock Recipe
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    Homemade Stock

    Average Rating:

    22 Total Reviews

    Showing 1-20 of 22

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    • on September 09, 2008

      I have been doing my veggie stock this way for a few months & figured I'd give a review! I LOVE to do this for a few reasons. One, it's cheap. Actually, it's free since all you use for this stock you usually just toss. Two, it's more natural, nutritional (I imagine), pure, and flavorful. There are no preservatives or things you can't pronounce in there. Super low sodium, too! Three, you can really modify the stock. Have an over abundance of tomatoes in your garden? Make a stock - it'd go great to cook with rice, etc. Since I like a stronger onion flavor I just add an extra "layer" or two off my onions when I peel them. Four, you can use veggies and scraps that were previously WASTED. Got some veggies in the fridge that are about to go bad? Toss them in the stock freezer bag! I NEVER EVER waste veggies now simply b/c I didn't use them in time. I put all my scraps in this, including ones I wouldn't necessarily eat. For example, I toss the onion skins but still add that tough outer layer of the onion to this; normall it'd just get trashed/wasted. I add the middles of peppers when I gut them - seeds and all. I've even tossed a few fruit items in there - don't be scared to try it (just don't get carried away)!! I usually cook it all in the crockpot overnight, line my strainer with paper towels, and drain. This prevents the seeds and parts from falling through. Depending on what I have in that batch, sometimes I don't use paper towels but rather strain then blend. I've never actually seen this recipe posted but it's SUCH an easy method that one should really try it rather than buying stock. Plus, you always have so much on hand you'll find yourself adding your stock to things you normally wouldn't. Adds flavor and nutrients! Thanks for sharing!!

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    • on March 17, 2009

      The ONLY downside to this (outside of your friends thinking you are bonkers for freezing your garbage) is it will never be the same - and that really isn't a down side is it? The ingredients will most always vary in selection, but amount also changes too. What is a given though is the wonderful flavor from such a simple recipe. I've enjoyed what I've made and really can't wait for the summer veggies to come calling (always hated throwing out the corn cob, seemed like there was just too much goodness left). You are only limited to your imagination on this one. THANK YOU!!

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    • on April 07, 2010

      Awesome idea!!!! I use every bit of my veggies now, no waste.. What a great money saver and I never have to worry about not having stock on hand. And it's fun to make.. :) Thanks so much.

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    • on October 25, 2009

      Fantastic idea and super easy! I have been using all of the spices and onion skins, carrots, celery, leeks, parsnips, garlic and mushrooms. Thanks for sharing.

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    • on October 19, 2009

      this is great. i cook on low in the crock pot for 20-24 hours or until the chicken bones break easily. thanks so much for posting!

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    • on March 04, 2009

      Wow! Thanks so much Karen. I made this today and it made so much. I now have 21 1/2 cups of vegetable/chicken stock ready to freeze. This with only a few days of adding to the freezer stock bag. I make celery, carrot & apple juice every morning so I had a lot of celery leaves and stalks to add to it. It is wonderful. I make risotto often so I am always buying 4cup containers of liquid stock, but not any more, this recipe is wonderful and I am so happy that I found it here. By the way I used the carcass of a roast chicken to add to the vegies in the stockpot. I also used more water because I did have a heap of vegetable peeling etc, that's why I got so much stock from it. What a wonderful idea Karen, thanks so much.

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    • on February 23, 2009

      Wow - I don't know why I never thought of this before. This is so easy to do and smelled so nice while simmering. Thanks for sharing!

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    • on January 08, 2009

      What a great idea! I have always made my own chicken stock. I make a whole chicken in the crockpot and use the juice that it develops and any leftover bones, skin, etc. Then I add water, salt/pepper, garlic, maybe onions, etc. I will save all my scraps from now on. I just started making this and added in some cabbage, Swiss chard stocks, ends of leeks, 2 carrots, stems from broccoli. I'll bet this will be even more awesome than usual! Like the idea to save trimmings from beef, although I don't usu. buy beef anymore, only occasionally. Then I can make my own beef stock. Edited to add: This made it into my Top Fav's of 2008 book.

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    • on September 02, 2008

      I will never ever ever buy stock at the store again! This is a great way to use up veggie peelings! It freezes so well!

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    • on May 12, 2008

      What a great idea- no more canned broth for me! This is a great way to control sodium intake, etc. & makes a lot of stock really fast. Now to use it all up....

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    • on November 30, 2013

      I have been using this method for awhile now and am just realizing that I never rated it. I was looking for it to give to a friend. Everyone should do this for so many reasons. I just threw two bags full of veggie scraps in a huge pot with the turkey carcass. It always turns out to be the most delicious homemade stock. I love not wasting all the parts of the veggies that we don't eat and also any veggies that are about to go bad. My favorite way to store the stock is by freezing it in my muffin tin, one batch at a time and then once frozen putting them in big zip lock freezer bags. Each one is 1/4 cup size. These thaw quickly and that way, I can pull them out when I need them rather than having to plan ahead and put a larger container in the fridge to defrost ahead of time. To everyone reading this method for the first time- once you try it you will wonder what took you so long! I could never go back to canned stock/broth again.

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    • on October 19, 2011

      I have tried this twice now, and both times my broth came out quite bitter. My mom says it's the celery leaves. Any idea what I'm doing wrong? I put in scraps from onions, tomatoes, carrots, broccoli, garlic, leeks, zucchini, and probably a few other veggies too. I really love this idea but my results are just not worth the effort yet. I am somewhat of a beginner cook so please tell me if there is something obvious that I'm doing wrong! Thanks.

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    • on February 18, 2008

      Wonderful money saving idea! I had enough leftover 'odds and ends' after a week and a half to fill a gallon bag. I thew the frozen blob into the crockpot, added enough water to fill it to the brim, a couple of small bay leaves, 1T peppercorns and handful of basil, then I cranked the heat to high for 1 hour (since I didn't thaw the veggies), waited another 5-6 hours and voila, vegetable broth to last and last! Also, I didn't strain it with a cheesecloth (I don't have one), I just used a very fine handheld colander. I froze them in 1 and 2 cup portion freezer containers and then popped them out the next morning and put them all into a gallon freezer bag. I'll never buy vegetable broth again - this is too easy!

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    • on January 09, 2008

      perfection! Thank you!!! I pour the cooled stock in old ice trays which equals about 1/3 cup give or take. Freeze them and then pop them out into a freezer bag. This is great because I can now make soups for my SIL who have a ton of food allegeries and control what goes into it. Thanks again!

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    • on January 08, 2008

      This worked great in the crock! Thanks for sharing this money saving idea.

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    • on December 08, 2007

      WOW! Every always told me to make my own vegie stalk, but I thought, what a waste of perfeclty good veggies. No one ever told me to use the left over peices, let alone how to freeze it. I looked a can of veggie stick and it hifructose(SP?) syrp in it, yuck! Abosolutly wonderful!

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    • on October 07, 2007

      I think this recipe is tops! I also use kohlrabi peels, corn cobs when the corn has been taken off, green onion tops, rutabaga peels. When wood burning stoves were used,now in fashion,I had a pot on the back of the stove and all peels and leavings from the vegies went in there with a little more water and spices, cooked while we were eating. I cooled,added little dabs of suitable leftovers and then added to a larger container in the freezer. I cooked again and strained when the pot was full and then put the leavings in the compost pile which was not much but every vitamin and source was squeezed out of the food. I still do it to this day but I cannot add any kind of meat to it since my hubby is in renal failure. But it is an absolute joy to have the stock or broth and not to purchase. This addes special flavor to all that you cook, whether it is added to mashed potatoes, or vegetable soup or thickened for sauce over rice or pasta. It doesn't cost you a dime except for the electricty or gas to cook and your labor and that is effortless since you have to cut and peel vegetables anyway.It is a wonderful lifesaver in the kitchen and now I mean that literally. Thanks Karen for posting!

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    • on July 15, 2007

      What a wonderful way to use up ALL the trimmings from preparing veggies. I do make Potato Peel Stock but never thought of adding onion skins and all those other trimmings from preparing veggies (usually go to compost bin). Great seasoning suggestions too. I made your broth using a variety of potato peelings (lots of them), carrot, broccoli, cauliflower, celery, green and yellow beans, onion skins (lots of them), tomatoes, and mushroom trimmings with bay leaf, peppercorns, thyme and basil for seasonings. I used potato water saved from boiling potatoes instead of the water too. I have always saved odd bits of leftover cooked veggies, gravy, cooked meats, etc. in an empty plastic ice cream container. When it gets full it is time to make soup so I will use your broth and add the leftovers from the ice cream container. I come from a 'waste not want not' era and this is really a good recipe to follow that guideline. Will use this formula recipe all the time. Thanks for posting.

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    • on June 20, 2007

      I absolutely love this recipe. I love the idea of actually saving up my vegetable peelings and leftovers instead of just throwing it all out since I really hate wasting food. My stock's been simmering for just over 2 hours now and it smells DIVINE. Mine's fairly light but I might let it go longer to get it more concentrated (then I can just easily dilute them later if I have to) then maybe freeze them in ice cube trays. I'm so happy with the outcome and I can't wait to freeze it all up and use it in all my meals! Thank you!!

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    • on March 28, 2007

      This is a great way to save money and have good, healthy cooking stock! I love to do this.

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    Nutritional Facts for Homemade Stock

    Serving Size: 1 (6789 g)

    Servings Per Recipe: 1

    Amount Per Serving
    % Daily Value
    Calories 84.4
     
    Calories from Fat 6
    99%
    Total Fat 0.7 g
    1%
    Saturated Fat 0.1 g
    0%
    Cholesterol 0.0 mg
    0%
    Sodium 125.0 mg
    5%
    Total Carbohydrate 18.6 g
    6%
    Dietary Fiber 5.4 g
    21%
    Sugars 5.9 g
    23%
    Protein 3.8 g
    7%

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