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    You are in: Home / Recipes / German Butterballs Recipe
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    German Butterballs

    Average Rating:

    4 Total Reviews

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    • on August 27, 2012

      Been eating butterballs since I can remember and they are much better when you use 2 teaspoons of allspice instead of just 1/2 teaspoon. In fact, when I eat chicken Ramen noodles, I always add allspice as it makes the taste very similar to the very thin noodle you guys are talking about.

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    • on October 29, 2011

      How exciting to know that my family was not the only ones who enjoyed Butterball Soup as a child. My German (from Russia) Grandmother ALSO made this special soup for the holidays...specifically Thanksgiving time. She would make the egg noodles by putting a mound of flour on a breadboard and putting her fist in to make a well for the eggs and milk. Then once she had them all rolled out...she would cut them ever so thinly with this huge knife. And she would dry them on tea towels all over the kitchen and dining room...and then bag them up and store them for later. The butterball (or as she said "booderglaze") was made from the dried bread (usually rolls). She dried them all over the house on racks and once she was satisfied they were dry...she would take a rolling pin to them (I know use my Cuisinart to pulverize them...it's much easier). Everything was measured by hand (very much like Chef Mom 007). It wasn't until one of my aunts stood beside her and measured everything that we actually got measurements. My dad actualy taught me how to make them. There is a certain feel to the ball when you roll it. And you must know the secret....test a couple prior to rolling up the rest of the dough. Test by dropping the balls in a pot of boiling water. If the balls float...they should be good. If they break apart...you need to add another egg to the batch...to help bind the crumbs together. Oh...and if you test one by breaking it apart and its too "gummy"...you might want to add more bread crumbs.
      I gotta tell you...I feel like I have found some "kin folk" here that I never expected. This year I will be making another HUGE BATCH of butterballs for my family. I have even adapted the recipe to make a vegan version for my daughter.
      My best wishes to everyone...and have a wonderful holiday!!!

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    • on July 22, 2009

      Thank you so much for posting this recipe! My German grandmother (from Russia) used to make these all the time, and although I tried many times to record the recipe on paper, she never measured anything ... hence, "one Grandma handful", "one-half Grandma handful", etc. In an effort to preserve all the wonderful authentic recipes she has made over the years, I have been trying to locate them online in hopes that she can at least answer any questions I may have (she's not in the best of health now). Grandma's Chicken and Butterball Soup included homemade chicken stock/broth, pieces of slowly simmered chicken, homemade noodles, and butterballs. It is my all time favorite of all her dishes. We used the angel hair attachment on my Italian pasta machine to make the noodles, and made extra for when we wanted to prepare another batch (the noodles are best when eaten the first time around, but they do reheat well - not from frozen). So simple, and melt in your mouth delicious! The ingredients listed are identical to the recipe I have, and I am so excited to finally have measurements. Will update this review after I have made them ;) By the way, for years she sold her frozen Butterballs and homemade noodles at Church functions to raise money for this-n-that ~ she will always be remembered for always selling out, and quickly. Thanks again so much for sharing - recipe dear to my heart!!!

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    • on October 17, 2004

      My Russian grandmother would put very fine egg noodles (homemade, of course) in her chicken and butterball soup. It was such a treat! Food and cooking memories are simply the best; their tastes linger through time. Although I haven't made these according to this receipe, all the ingredients look correct. So simple - quite delicious! SL, the Netherlands

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    Nutritional Facts for German Butterballs

    Serving Size: 1 (128 g)

    Servings Per Recipe: 6

    Amount Per Serving
    % Daily Value
    Calories 470.5
     
    Calories from Fat 207
    44%
    Total Fat 23.0 g
    35%
    Saturated Fat 12.5 g
    62%
    Cholesterol 110.1 mg
    36%
    Sodium 694.1 mg
    28%
    Total Carbohydrate 52.9 g
    17%
    Dietary Fiber 3.2 g
    13%
    Sugars 4.5 g
    18%
    Protein 12.4 g
    24%

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