3 Reviews

I can attest that this recipe is spot-on. I make maduros at home as well as always order them whenever I go to a restaurant that serves them. The balance of sweet/fruity with salty/acidic is what maduros are all about, and if you follow this recipe (and use your taste buds when adding the salt and juice) you will be able to accomplish this. <br/><br/>I live in Florida and am hispanic (though I'm not cubano), and I can assure you that to my knowledge I have NEVER eaten maduros that had been rolled in sugar at any point the way others are suggesting. If you ever feel the need to roll your plátanos in sugar before frying it is likely because they are not ripe enough. Color of the peel is not always enough to tell a ripe plátano; it could be solid black but still not ripe enough (this will happen if you stored them in the fridge). If the plátano is not sweet enough on its own to eat it raw because it's too starchy, then it's not ripe no matter what it looks like.

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Adam B. March 08, 2014

I also roll them in sugar. Over all this is a great recipe.

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ChezNicolette January 31, 2007

I roll my platanos in sugar after frying to make them even sweeter. I've never heard of using lemon juice and salt to make fried sweet plaintains!?!

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KarlaMaria April 16, 2004
Fried Sweet Plantains (platanos maduros fritos)