Recipe Sifter

X
  • Start Here
    • Course
    • Main Ingredient
    • Cuisine
    • Preparation
    • Occasion
    • Diet
    • Nutrition
1

Select () or exclude () categories to narrow your recipe search.

2

As you select categories, the number of matching recipes will update.

Make some selections to begin narrowing your results.
  • Calories
  • Amount per serving
    1. Total Fat
    2. Saturated Fat
    3. Polyunsat. Fat
    4. Monounsat. Fat
    5. Trans Fat
  • Cholesterol
  • Sodium
  • Potassium
  • Total Carbohydrates
    1. Dietary Fiber
    2. Sugars
  • Protein
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin B6
  • Vitamin B12
  • Vitamin C
  • Calcium
  • Iron
  • Vitamin E
  • Magnesium
  • Alcohol
  • Caffeine
  • Find exactly what you're looking for with the web's most powerful recipe filtering tool.

    You are in: Home / Recipes / Cooking a Turkey in a Bag Recipe
    Lost? Site Map

    Cooking a Turkey in a Bag

    Average Rating:

    21 Total Reviews

    Showing 1-20 of 21

    Sort by:

    • on November 24, 2000

      The Turkey was wonderful!!! My Husband thought I was crazy when he read the note I left him in the morning when he got up to put it in the oven. when I pulled it out of the oven he said it was the prettiest Turkey he had ever seen, But said lets wait to see what it taste like. when he tried it at my parents he loved it and made sure every one know he was the one who cooked it since he was the one who put it in the oven

      people found this review Helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No
    • on December 27, 2000

      I'm sorry, but I tried this method for my Christmas turkey and the results just do not comapare with preparing a turkey the old-fashioned way . . . basting frequently in a roasting pan in a hot oven. The turkey skin did not fully brown and the wings/legs had a distinct steamed texture. This is an easier way of cooking a turkey, but sometimes easier is not better.

      people found this review Helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No
    • on November 08, 2011

      I have always used the paper bag method. The trick, though, is not to seal it too tightly. If it is tightly sealed, it will steam. I use the largest size bag, not doubled. Usually there is a printed label on one side. Cut that off and what remains of the bag is enough to cover the largest turkey. Put the turkey on a rack and use the bag to form a tent over the turkey, just tucking it in along the sides. Don't staple it shut because you do want to leave small gaps for the steam to escape. The turkeys turn out moist and perfectly browned.

      people found this review Helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No
    • on March 27, 2007

      Something for you to think about before proceeding with this method. Brown Paper Bag Method: Source: University of Illinois Extension http://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/turkey/techniques.html#good3 This method involves placing the turkey in a large brown paper bag, the type used in grocery stores, and cooking the bird at a very low temperature. Experts agree that brown paper bags were never intended for use as cooking utensils. The glue, ink, chemicals and other materials used in recycling grocery bags are unsanitary and some bags may even contain tiny metal shavings. Make It Safe - To make this method safe, replace the brown bag with a turkey-size oven-cooking bag. Cooking turkey at temperatures below 325°F is unsafe, so increase the oven temperature to 350°F. Use a food thermometer. A whole turkey is safe when cooked to a minimum internal temperature of 165 °F as measured with a food thermometer. Check the internal temperature in the innermost part of the thigh and wing and the thickest part of the breast. For reasons of personal preference, you may choose to cook the turkey to higher temperatures. The temperature in all parts should read 165 °F or higher.

      people found this review Helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No
    • on September 14, 2003

      I tried this with a whole chicken because I was curious to see how it would turn out, and whether it would brown nicely and be juicy, and was pleasantly surprised! It turned out wonderful! What a unique way to cook something!

      people found this review Helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No
    • on December 28, 2001

      I used CHICKEN instead of turkey, and it was very, very, good. The skin was evenly browned,the meat was juicy, tender and flavorful. I stuffed the cavity with fresh rosemary, thyme and onions.

      people found this review Helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No
    • on January 06, 2014

      I have cooked a turkey in a paper sack for 30+ years and everyone says it's the best turkey they have ever had. The only difference is I bathe mine in mayonnaise which you cannot taste at all it makes the turkey really moist and the dry air in the bag makes the outside crisp. Have never put butter in the bag

      person found this review Helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No
    • on January 14, 2008

      There are special bags sold for the purpose of roasting - I use the special bags for my turkey and it always comes out moist, browned and flavorful.

      person found this review Helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No
    • on November 23, 2004

      Roasting Turkey in a Brown Paper Bag is NOT a good idea. I have just read that it may be dangerous, in fact, because toxins in the paper are released into the bird during the cooking process.

      person found this review Helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No
    • on November 18, 2012

      I will stick to using oven bags to cook my turkey. I'm sorry to say but I in grocery store and where the bags are stored at the register is not the cleanest place one. Two the glue, the ink and whatever else might be on the bag I don't want in my food. They make oven bags for this reason. And from the sounds of this recipe it is the same thing but with a nice clean plastic bag vs. a bag you are not sure if someone sneezed on. Just saying with today's germs you got to be careful.

      people found this review Helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No
    • on November 04, 2006

      This recipe brought back wonderful memories. This is how my Mother (who was a wonder cook) always cooked her turkeys. Thanks for posting this recipe.

      people found this review Helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No
    • on November 25, 2005

      This is the easiest way to cook a bird and it comes out the juciest.

      people found this review Helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No
    • on November 23, 2005

      For the last 40 years this is the ONLY way I have cooked a turkey. It comes out moist, brown and delicious everytime. As far as chemicals...please....aren't we all filled with them anyway?? Try it, it will be the easiest turkey you EVER made!

      people found this review Helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No
    • on December 23, 2004

      This process did not impress me. I cooked my 8lb bird for 3hrs at 375, cooked until the instant read thermometer read 170, let the bird sit in the bag for 20 mins to rest. I will say that the bird wasn't dried out, but it was as white as white could be..this bird had no colour whatsoever, and was really quite unattractive looking once I pulled it out of the bag. It was basically a steamed turkey. I don't know what I could possibly have done wrong to get such poor results, I followed the recipe verbatim. I was very disappointed as I was hoping for a nice brown juicy birdie for dinner.

      people found this review Helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No
    • on December 14, 2004

      I made my first turkey this year and saw your brown paper bag idea here and decided to try it. It was WONDERFUL! Thank you so much for sharing your tricks of the trade so my family could enjoy a nice, juicy bird!

      people found this review Helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No
    • on December 07, 2004

      This was my first Thanksgiving bird and it was beautiful! Even my MIL complemented my cooking!

      people found this review Helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No
    • on November 28, 2004

      I used this recipe for my first turkey many years ago. I had honestly forgot about it until coming across it on recipezaar. Thank you so much for sharing this recipe with others. P.S. I only used one bag on a small turkey and after rinsing and drying the turkey, put a rosemary and ginger rub on, sealed it in the buttered bag, and put it in the fridge for 24 hours and then roasted the turkey in the same bag. Works great and had superb flavor!

      people found this review Helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No
    • on November 11, 2004

      Thank you. It worked well.

      people found this review Helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No
    • on December 30, 2003

      Made this for my very first Thanksgiving & it worked perfectly! One small tip-putting another oven rack on TOP of the turkey WILL result in fire...LOL. The skin was perfectly browned & the meat was moist & juicy. YUM!

      people found this review Helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No
    • on October 29, 2003

      I made this last Thanksgiving, and am now printing it up for friends who loved it. My husband was worried it would not work (he is the cook and I am not) so he smoked a "back up turkey" to cover me. People went nuts over both! I thought it was simple, easy and delicious. I peppered my turkey with fresh group black pepper, otherwise I stuck to the recipe. This would be fabulous for someone trying their first Thanksgiving bird.

      people found this review Helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No
    « Previous 1 2

    Advertisement

    Nutritional Facts for Cooking a Turkey in a Bag

    Serving Size: 1 (454 g)

    Servings Per Recipe: 20

    Amount Per Serving
    % Daily Value
    Calories 726.4
     
    Calories from Fat 327
    45%
    Total Fat 36.4 g
    56%
    Saturated Fat 10.2 g
    51%
    Cholesterol 308.7 mg
    102%
    Sodium 295.1 mg
    12%
    Total Carbohydrate 0.0 g
    0%
    Dietary Fiber 0.0 g
    0%
    Sugars 0.0 g
    0%
    Protein 92.7 g
    185%

    Advertisement


    Over 475,000 Recipes

    Food.com Network of Sites