Classic Kugel (Passover)

Total Time
1hr 35mins
Prep 45 mins
Cook 50 mins

From a newspaper article called Crossing Delancy: Food and History by Judith Segal. This is what was printed before the recipe "Families which follow the tradition of not eating gebruks should substitute potato flour for the matzoh during passover. A potato kugel may be "parve," containing neither milk nor meat. If it is being prepared specifically for a meat meal, however, rendered chicken fat may replace the vegetable oil. Because poor families could not afford many eggs, the old-fashioned potato kugels were heavier, leaden, due to fewer eggs (a function of cost) and no baking powder. The new, modern, kugels are lighter, creamier, more custardy and souffle-like, the result of using more eggs and adding baking powder."

Ingredients Nutrition

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.
  2. Peel potatoes and grate them into ice water.
  3. If grating with a food processor, cut the potatoes into large chunks befroe adding to the porcessor bowl, and transfer them after processing them, into ice water.
  4. Peel and grate the onion and set aside.
  5. Break the eggs separately and inspect for blood spots, discarding any spotted ones.
  6. Separate the yolks and whites and set aside.
  7. Place the grated potatoes in a fine colander and wring them out, holding them in either paper or linen dish towels.
  8. Squeeze very firmly and when the pieces are damp and almost dry, put the potatoes into a large mixing bowl.
  9. Add the grated onion to the bowl.
  10. Thoroughly grease a 2 quart baking dish with oil, margarine or chicken fat.
  11. Beat the egg yolks and add the yolk to the potatoes and onions; mix well.
  12. Add the matzoh meal, the baking powder, the salt and pepper, and the oil to the potato mixture; mix thoroughly.
  13. Beat the egg whites separately with a cake mixer or egg beater; the fluffier the better.
  14. Carefully fold the egg whites into the potato mixture and transfer to the greased baking dish and bake for 45-60 minutes, until golden brown on top.
Most Helpful

Had this for passover, was great, everyone had seconds, the dish was empty before everyone had enough! (Seven at the table, and LOTS of other stuff to eat). So, a great success. But shouldn't we be using baking soda, not powder?

idarefsky April 16, 2009