Total Time
1hr
Prep 30 mins
Cook 30 mins

This is taken from the Congo Cookbook. Unleavened bread that is very popular and is served with many curry dishes. I am estimating the servings as I have not made this yet. It looks good and simple so I do plan on making.

Ingredients Nutrition

Directions

  1. All ingredients should be allowed to come to room temperature if they have been in the refrigerator.
  2. Mix flour and salt in a bowl.
  3. Slowly mix in enough water to make a thick dough.
  4. Mix in one spoonful oil.
  5. Knead dough on a cool surface for a few minutes, adding a few spoonfuls of dry flour.
  6. Return dough to the bowl, cover with a clean cloth, and let it rest for thirty minutes.
  7. Lightly grease (with cooking oil) and pre-heat a skillet or griddle.
  8. Divide the dough into orange-sized balls. Flatten them into six-inch circles. Fry them in the skillet or griddle, turning once, until each side is golden brown and spotted.
  9. Place in warm oven as they are done and serve with butter and any curry, stew or soup dish.
Most Helpful

4 5

this turned out great. just like an indian restaurant down the street from me. a great variety from the regular bread here in the philippines which is sweet. try adding poppy seeds for a different look and taste......

4 5

I study in Kenya and my host-family's method of making chapatis is almost identical to this recipe. Some people do use whole wheat flour (brown bread flour) and are successful. Chapatis have been a part of East African cuisine for centuries, and they are as much a part of East African food as they are Indian. Also, they are slightly different than Indian chapatis.

Mine did not turn out like the photo in the silver dish. They more resembled tortillas. Next time I will leave them thicker instead of rolling so thin. Thanks Janet. It was a fun experiment and introduction to a new type of bread.