Recipe Sifter

X
  • Start Here
    • Course
    • Main Ingredient
    • Cuisine
    • Preparation
    • Occasion
    • Diet
    • Nutrition
1

Select () or exclude () categories to narrow your recipe search.

2

As you select categories, the number of matching recipes will update.

Make some selections to begin narrowing your results.
  • Calories
  • Amount per serving
    1. Total Fat
    2. Saturated Fat
    3. Polyunsat. Fat
    4. Monounsat. Fat
    5. Trans Fat
  • Cholesterol
  • Sodium
  • Potassium
  • Total Carbohydrates
    1. Dietary Fiber
    2. Sugars
  • Protein
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin B6
  • Vitamin B12
  • Vitamin C
  • Calcium
  • Iron
  • Vitamin E
  • Magnesium
  • Alcohol
  • Caffeine
  • Find exactly what you're looking for with the web's most powerful recipe filtering tool.

    You are in: Home / Recipes / Champagne 101 Recipe
    Lost? Site Map

    Champagne 101

    1/6 Photos of Champagne 101

    more photos

    Total Time:

    Prep Time:

    Cook Time:

    2 mins

    2 mins

    0 mins

    "Food:The Way To Anyone's Heart"'s Note:

    No celebration is complete without a Champagne toast. Learn about Champagne, other sparkling wines, and how to serve them. Champagne by itself is wonderful, but add a splash of nectar/juice or fresh raspberries and the flavor is enhanced.

    • Save to Recipe Box

    • Add to Grocery List

    • Print

    • Email

    My Private Note

    Ingredients:

    Servings:

    Units: US | Metric

    • 1 (750 ml) bottle champagne
    • fresh raspberry
    • fresh peach slices
    • apricot nectar or peach nectar
    • orange juice

    Directions:

    1. 1
      Vintage vs. Non-Vintage Champagne: All Champagnes are made from grapes grown in France's northeastern region, the Champagne province. Most Champagnes are non-vintage: that is, they are made from a blend of grapes from different years, aged in the bottle for 18 months. Vintage Champagne is made with high-quality grapes from the same year; they must be aged three years before they are released.
    2. 2
      Champagnes from Dry to Sweet: In addition to classifying Champagne as vintage or non-vintage, 6 classifications are used to refer directly to the Champagne's sweetness:.
    3. 3
      Brut: dry, less than 1.5% sugar.
    4. 4
      Extra Sec: extra dry, 1.2 to 2% sugar.
    5. 5
      Sec: medium sweet, 1.7 to 3.5% sugar.
    6. 6
      Demi-Sec: sweet, 3.3 to 5% sugar (Served as a dessert champagne).
    7. 7
      Doux: very sweet, over 5% sugar (Served as a dessert champagne).
    8. 8
      Other Wines with Bubbles: Sparkling wines made by the same process can't be called Champagne unless they're made in their namesake French region. Chardonnay and pinot noir grapes are the main varieties used to make Champagne, and they're grown all over the world; many regions produce fine sparkling wines that are somewhat less expensive and more widely available than French Champagne. Italian Prosecco and Asti, Spanish Cava and German Sekt are all delicious varieties of sparkling wine.
    9. 9
      As a side note: the small clusters of grapes sold in the supermarket as "champagne grapes" are just using the cachet of the name: they're actually fresh zante currants.
    10. 10
      Serving Champagne: Chill the wine in the coldest part of your refrigerator. Open the bottle by twisting off the wire cage over the cork, keeping your thumb over the cork. Keep the bottle at an angle, with the cork pointing away from you. Grasp the neck of the bottle with a dry cloth; with your thumb over the cork, gently twist the bottle. You should feel the cork easing itself loose. Don't go for the dramatic pop: removing the cork should be almost soundless.
    11. 11
      Serve Champagne in clean, dry flutes--narrow glasses with tall sides--which show off the color and the fine bubbles while keeping the carbonation from dissipating. "Prime" the glasses by pouring a small amount of wine into the bottom of each glass, letting the foam subside before filling them fully.

    Browse Our Top Beverages Recipes

    Ratings & Reviews:

    • on September 26, 2013

      55

      Very helpful! We should find time more often to celebrate with champagne!

      people found this review Helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No
    • on December 30, 2010

      55

      While not technically a recipe, this was extremely helpful.

      people found this review Helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes | No

    Advertisement

    Nutritional Facts for Champagne 101

    Serving Size: 1 (186 g)

    Servings Per Recipe: 4

    Amount Per Serving
    % Daily Value
    Calories 152.8
     
    Calories from Fat 0
    %
    Total Fat 0.0 g
    0%
    Saturated Fat 0.0 g
    0%
    Cholesterol 0.0 mg
    0%
    Sodium 9.3 mg
    0%
    Total Carbohydrate 4.8 g
    1%
    Dietary Fiber 0.0 g
    0%
    Sugars 1.7 g
    7%
    Protein 0.1 g
    0%

    Ideas from Food.com

    Advertisement


    Over 475,000 Recipes

    Food.com Network of Sites