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This is a delicious, easy, and healthy bread. It was a bit too saltly for my taste. When I make it again, (which I definitely will!) I don't want to mess with the amount of salt though in case the bread doesn't rise properly. It was also very small, only 6 or 7 inches wide. I'm almost certain that it's supposed to be larger though, because this is my first time baking any bread other than banana bread. It would be helpful if the directions were a bit more specific about the size of the loaf though. Thanks for sharing!

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DCKiki November 26, 2008

This is great whatever it's origin. I made it to go with a vegetable bean soup and it was the perfect thing. I think I'll be making this often, it's so easy and quick to make (and no kneading).

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Annacia January 16, 2007

Bannocks ARE scottish and these are a very good recipe!I am a BURNS and these are very traditional - thanks for posting this recipe!

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French Tart January 12, 2007

reminds me of irish soda bread thanks for posting dee

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Dienia B. June 24, 2006

"Kenny Blacksmith, a former chief of the Cree community of Mistissini of northern Quebec, told me that they learned to make bannock from the Scottish who settled up in Northern Quebec several hundred years ago. They did not have flour before the arrival of the Europeans. When he went to Scotland a couple of years back, he had the priviledge of teaching the Scottish again how to make bannock." - Jacques Dalton canadianhistory.com

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johncameron77 December 15, 2005
Buttermilk Bannock