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    You are in: Home / Recipes / Basic Vanilla Custard Recipe
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    Basic Vanilla Custard

    Average Rating:

    24 Total Reviews

    Showing 1-20 of 24

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    • on February 08, 2013

      Just a comment in response to previous comments- this *is* custard. Custard is milk thickened with eggs. The cooking method doesn't matter- it can be baked or cooked on a stovetop. The consistency doesn't matter- custard can be thick and creamy or thin and pourable (like the custard "creme anglaise"). It doesn't matter if it is cooked in a bain marie or not. Thickeners such as cornstarch are often added to custards as in recipes for pastry cream (such as go in eclairs). The *eggs* are what sets custards apart, and any good chef knows that, as a chef is supposed to know 100 ways to cook an egg, one for every pleat in the chef's hat. This *may* or *may not* be an outstanding recipe, but one thing is for sure: it's a custard recipe. But don't take my word for it. Look it up.

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    • on January 20, 2013

      This is good, but it's not custard. It's old-fashioned pudding. Custard is much different in consistency-- silkier -- no cornstarch to thicken it and is baked in a bain marie (a larger pan with hot water). If you are having trouble with this scorching in your pan, try using a double boiler.

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    • on November 18, 2012

      This was so good. I made some for my 2 year old and he ate 2 bowls. I recommend straining the eggs before you put them in and straining the custard before you chill it. Make sure u get the custard to pudding thickness while you are cooking it because it doesn't really thicken in the fridge. Such a yummy recipe

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    • on February 07, 2013

      Gardenpoet is right, this is vanilla PUDDING...custard is baked in a double boiler in the oven for 50-60 minutes, if you try to pass this of as custard to a chef, they will laugh you out of the kitchen. Custard & CR?ME BR?L?E are closely related as they are both cooked the same way & time, & the recipe is similar while neither use thickening.

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    • on January 04, 2013

      Wow this is an easy fast recipe. Made it for our 25-mth old twin girls during Xmas holidays in Lebanon in my MIL's very basic kitchen. Reduced sugar to 2T and poured over sliced banana. Even my hubby was loving it :)

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    • on October 14, 2012

      This is an easy recipe for really good custard. I made it according to directions, and didn't even need to strain the egg mixture. However, I'm not overly fond of vanilla, so I added some orange extract (about 3/4 teaspoon, to taste) that went really well with the amount of vanilla in it. Definitely a recipe to hang on to. This will go well with anything pumpkin for the holidays.

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    • on February 02, 2009

      Mam, I'm speechless. Your bread pudding and this wonderful custard make a great combination. It's truly a warm experience. In fact it can make one forget a miserable day.

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    • on January 19, 2015

      Very delicious!

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    • on January 08, 2015

      The confusion between what is or isn't custard has more to do with terminology than to the recipe under discussion.<br/><br/>To the British and ex-pats living in the 'colonies' custard is the stuff Birds and Harry Horne make - it's yellow, easy to make, kids love it, Mums love it because it gets extra milk into the kids and warms their little tummies on cold winter days, and it's ingredients are corn starch, tapioca starch, potato starch, salt, colour, artificial flavour, and arrowroot flour. It is poured over any pudding the cook deems will benefit by its addition - i.e. spotted dick, bread and butter pudding, steamed fruit, jam roly poly. <br/><br/>Further, the English traditionally refer to what North Americans call dessert as 'pudding' which is whatever dish follows the entrée - aside from cheese and biscuits (crackers to North Americans). So 'pudding;' which means for North Americans a recipe that is similar to the packaged dessert sold as Instant Pudding doesn't necessarily mean that at all to the English and their relatives although most of us are flexible and tend to be "mid-Atlantic" in our usage. We tend to adopt Americanisms when in America - it seems the polite thing to do even if it was our language to begin with - and revert to our own language when at home.<br/><br/>So, is this a custard recipe? For those who understand my reference to Birds and Harry Horne, yes, it is. For those who insist we are wrong, I suggest wider travel, greater tolerance for the views (and language) of others and a less dictatorial attitude.<br/><br/>The comment that really stunned me though was the one suggesting using a double boiler in the oven. I assume a ban marie was what was meant. Most double boilers have handles that were never meant to see the inside of a hot oven and would be ruined if ever they did.

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    • on September 04, 2014

      I miss custard. Something I took for granted living in New Zealand was having either ready-made custard, or custard powder. This recipe is close, but not as thick (I guess you'd have to cook it a little longer) and it's a bit sweeter. Don't get me wrong, this is a great recipe and I will make it again in the future, but I will use probably 1/3 less sugar next time and see how that comes out. Thanks for posting this recipe. It's pretty easy. The key for people who keep getting clumps is you have to treat it like gravy and stir quite frequently to ensure the starch doesn't stick to the bottom, or the milk burns. <br/><br/>I'm keen to get a can of boysenberries and try some of this with that. It was one of my favorite yet infrequent desserts back home.

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    • on August 23, 2014

      I just made this with my 6 year old daughter and it turned out lovely. We added 2.5 teaspoons of vanilla for extra taste. We served it straight away over some hot apple pies and it was delish!

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    • on June 11, 2014

      My partner made this with no cooking experience and no trouble. It was a tasty, no fuss, quick custard to make. What I like about it is that it is made with milk alone, rather than half cream (I used skim milk); that it uses whole eggs instead of just egg yolks (less waste, less fuss); and that it isn't too sweet (next time will try with a natural sugar substitute). For guests or a special occasion you might want to try a richer, more complex custard (I agree with below poster that this is a custard not pudding - at least in Australian terminology... there are many types/ways of cooking custard), however, for a quick custard anyone can make, poured over poached pears on a cold winter night - this did the trick!

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    • on April 25, 2014

      Easy and delicious

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    • on April 12, 2014

      This is actually a pudding. Custard is made with milk (and/or cream), egg yolks, sugar, spice. The more yolks, the thicker it will be.

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    • on April 12, 2014

      I really enjoyed the ease of the custard recipe! The plain nature of the recipe lends itself well to modification (I added 1/4 cup of chocolate chips, 1tsp cardamom, 1tsp nutmeg, and 1tsp cinnamon to sweeten the deal). Best custard I have had in years!

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    • on April 02, 2014

      Yummy. It's custard in my books, but I'm English, so what could I know about food...<br/><br/>I substituted 4 tbsp. flour for the cornstarch, added just a dash of vanilla, and threw in a little sprinkle of nutmeg and a cracked cardamom pod just after the eggs were stirred in.<br/><br/>It turned out very tasty, but too sweet for me. Next time I'll halve the sugar. There WILL be a next time!<br/><br/>Great recipe, thank you!!

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    • on March 22, 2014

      This recipe is very easy to follow for a beginner, although I personally had problems with it the first time. I had the heat up too high and I kept ignoring it for too long so it came out lumpy, but it still tasted okay. My second and third attempts were much more successful. Tastes very good when stuffed into crepes or other pastries, but not so much on it's own.

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    • on February 11, 2014

      Quick, easy and tasty. I made 1/2 the recipe for oatmeal creme brulee. Awesome.

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    • on January 20, 2014

      this is the way english custard is made, this is a custard recipe as some one stated it old fashioned custard pudding, no its custard that thick stuff is pudding. I am glad to have a proper reciepe my mum was english and she never showed us how to make this. Since she has passed away I am very happy to have the correct recipe. I read the custard powder ingredients and its cornflour salt and vanilla, I would rather make it from scratch. thank you so much

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    • on December 30, 2013

      This turned out really well. I added some rice from a takeout Chinese dinner to make it into rice pudding. To my surprise it is delicious. This is a very good basic pudding/custard! My goodness, what is all the fuss about? Just eat and enjoy!

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    Nutritional Facts for Basic Vanilla Custard

    Serving Size: 1 (168 g)

    Servings Per Recipe: 4

    Amount Per Serving
    % Daily Value
    Calories 196.5
     
    Calories from Fat 61
    31%
    Total Fat 6.8 g
    10%
    Saturated Fat 3.5 g
    17%
    Cholesterol 110.0 mg
    36%
    Sodium 95.9 mg
    3%
    Total Carbohydrate 26.2 g
    8%
    Dietary Fiber 0.0 g
    0%
    Sugars 16.8 g
    67%
    Protein 7.1 g
    14%

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