Total Time
35mins
Prep 15 mins
Cook 20 mins

Boiled make it sound awful (& is really a misnomer as the fish is simmered gently until just done) but it is unbelievably delicious & soul satisfying. Located in the Miami Herald who adapted it from Culinaria The Caribbean by Rosemary Parkinson, (Konemann, 1999). The Miami herald article said: "Bahamian people know there is nothing like a good fish broth or soup to give you strength for the day ahead. Any white fish can be used but grouper is preferred (see source). Serve with grits and cornbread." If you can locate fish peppers to use in this dish, they are wonderful.

Ingredients Nutrition

Directions

  1. Place the fish in a non-reactive dish and add the lime juice. Sprinkle with salt and pepper to taste.
  2. Pour 2 cups of water into a pot and add the onions, garlic, parsley and thyme, potatoes, butter and chile pepper. Bring to a boil and boil about 10 minutes or until the potatoes are almost done (add more water, if necessary).
  3. Add the fish with marinade juices, reduce the heat to low and simmer about 10 minutes, or until the fish is just cooked through and starting to flake.
  4. Taste and adjust for salt and pepper. Serve hot.
Most Helpful

3 5

My grandparents are from the Bahamas and cooked this all the time. Did I ever eat it, no, too young to appreciate it. So of course as I matured I really had a hankering for this dish. I believe the boiling came from my grandmother making her own fish stock, that's how those ladies did it back then. You definitely cannot boil this dish as the fish is too delicate. I did enjoy this dish, but will make the fish stock next time.

4 5

Double the potatoes and rice. Plus add some more heat with some hot sauce. Serve over rice.