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    You are in: Home / Recipes / Authentic Injera (aka Ethiopian Flat Bread) Recipe
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    Authentic Injera (aka Ethiopian Flat Bread)

    Average Rating:

    19 Total Reviews

    Showing 1-19 of 19

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    • on May 09, 2012

      To those who failed with the recipe as written, all I can say is that you did it wrong. This recipe is absolutely authentic (except for he addition of salt and oiling the pan...neither addition makes a true injera ).
      The fermentation is key to the flavor, and an adequately hot and well seasoned pan (or if you aren't worried about the the health concerns, a teflon pan) is all you need. Also, as someone earlier pointed out, it takes a while to firm up so don't be in a hurry to try and remove it from the pan. It may seem slightly dry when you finally do, but after it sits it will achieve the proper spongy texture.

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    • on June 05, 2010

      This recipe is identical to one I have from a friend of mine who is an Ethiopian refugee. I substitute a mixture of self rising flour and wheat flour, and it is very good and indistinguishable from the injera served at the Ethiopian restaurant here in Indy. To those who found it inauthentic I would suggest that perhaps the kind you have had before was made by someone from a different region? Or maybe you didn't let it ferment to the point that it developed its distinctive flavor? The first time I made injera I only let it ferment for about 10 hours, and yes, it was flat and pasty tasting (I also didn't know I could add salt because my friend's recipe didn't call for it).

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    • on September 05, 2009

      This tasted nothing like the authentic injera from Ethiopia. It was flat, without texture, and the taste was harsh. I will never use this recipe again.

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    • on January 19, 2009

      Matches my experience of eating this bread at the Nile restaurant in Richmond, VA- authentic Ehiopian food. Good, but I still haven't quite matches theirs.

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    • on January 05, 2009

      I had Injera in some place in DC (Crystal City?) and became fascinated with Injera. I got 20 pounds of teff flour and looked for a recipe. This one seemed the simplest. I just made it today, after an overnight rising. This is nothing like the Injera I had in DC. It's way better. It's like handmade tortillas versus factory tortillas. To those who aren't getting it to work: you have to let it cook for a surprisingly long time, and leave it along. But man is it good!

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    • on October 26, 2008

      Gloopy mess. Did not work for me.

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    • on May 01, 2008

      This recipe did not work for me. It was fermenting alright after a day ... I could smell the sourness, and there were bubbles. But when I tried to cook them, they ended up all sticky and wouldn't hold together ... and I tried 4 times. I used Teff, as instructed. I'm not sure what went wrong, but after doing some research it seems that the real process involves a little more work, including kneading etc. http://burakaeyae.blogspot.com/2007/02/step-by-step-injera-instructions-real.html is what I will try next.

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    • on January 20, 2008

      I initially thought this recipe was awful, but actually it is quite good...one of the better ones I have found. Because only Teff flour is used, the injera becomes quite dark which is what many may be unfamiliar with. It's only short of 1 star to be excellent, but that's only because I'd like to find a ratio of wheat flour to make it just a little thicker. Thanks Heather!

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    • on March 20, 2006

      This is a very authentic version of Injera. It has a nice sour tang to it because of the fermentation. I didn't have teff flour, but I ground teff in my spice mill and used that instead. If you use whole teff, you will have gray/brown injera - it's not a color for the squeamish!

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    • on March 31, 2013

      As an Ethiopian, it is embarrassing to read this recipe. Everything is wrong. Adding salt? Oiling the pan? It is not easy to make injera, however, you should have asked an Ethiopian before you posted it as " authentic....." don't waste your time and money, you are not gonna get Injera.

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    • on March 28, 2013

      The quality of the product actually depends on the fermentation... which does best with a stable yeast such as bread yeast, rather than relying on the wild yeast of whereever you live. Those of you who had trouble, try adding 1/4 tsp bread yeast to the batter, and giving it an overnight raise. For a more sour taste, let it ferment longer.

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    • on July 14, 2012

      Comment on flavor. I don't especially like the sour taste described here. Recently I ate at an Ethopiean restaurant (excellent online reviews) where the flat bread was not sour, although its apperance and texture were what I always see. The chef/owner told me his was not sour because he makes it fresh everyday.

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    • on May 01, 2012

      i followed this recipe and all i got was a big mess. awful!

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    • on May 17, 2011

      Something is missing in this recipe. Separately, an Ethiopian friend and I both tried the recipe with identical results: the bread would split and the remainder was a "goopy mess," to use another's description. The taste was good, but as injera needs to be a well formed pancake to serve as the eating utensil, form is as important as taste. There is either some procedure not listed that makes the pancake adhere better or some vitally important missing ingredient.

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    • on July 01, 2010

      Disappointing. I waited the three days for it to ferment, which made my house smell like dirty gym socks. It did not turn out spongy at all and I had to use a small crepe pan to be able to salvage it. It broke apart. Not at all like Zed's Ethiopian restaurant in DC...Waaaaahhh! I will try some of the other recipes since I have leftover teff flour.

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    • on October 24, 2009

      This recipe is NOT Authentic. My friend is the owner of an Ethiopian restaurant in Tampa - Queen of Sheba. I arranged a cooking lesson with her. There is a 3 day process, but it is involved. I'm still learning as it takes an understanding of the fermentation process, bubbles and more. I actually cooked some there for the restaurant.

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    • on January 08, 2008

      very good

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    • on December 09, 2007

      have been looking for this recipe for my daughter who loves Ethopian food. thank you very much

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    • on October 05, 2007

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    Nutritional Facts for Authentic Injera (aka Ethiopian Flat Bread)

    Serving Size: 1 (47 g)

    Servings Per Recipe: 10

    Amount Per Serving
    % Daily Value
    Calories 0.0
     
    Calories from Fat 0
    %
    Total Fat 0.0 g
    0%
    Saturated Fat 0.0 g
    0%
    Cholesterol 0.0 mg
    0%
    Sodium 1.4 mg
    0%
    Total Carbohydrate 0.0 g
    0%
    Dietary Fiber 0.0 g
    0%
    Sugars 0.0 g
    0%
    Protein 0.0 g
    0%

    The following items or measurements are not included:

    teff

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