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    You are in: Home / Recipes / Antipasto Recipe
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    Antipasto

    Average Rating:

    15 Total Reviews

    Showing 1-15 of 15

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    • on January 07, 2002

      loved this recipe, gave some out for x-mas and it got rave reviews. i processed it so it would keep and it turned out great. i'll be making a million jars of this in the coming months!!!! thanks,treko

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    • on May 09, 2002

      I'm sure this makes a lovely tasting antipasto, but it can be highly dangerous to can. Antipasto recipes containing olives or seafood are NOT safe for home canning. Seafood and olives are low acid foods and produce botulism. The following excerpt is from the Bernardin Home Canning website: Note:Because antipasto is available commercially, many people believe they can preserve their own recipe at home. Most traditional antipasto recipes cannot be home canned safely in a boiling water bath canner. (However, some can be frozen successfully.) When the recipe adds low acid foods such as tuna (or other canned seafood), olives, mushrooms, vegetables and/or oil– the resulting food mixture needs to be processed at temperatures higher than those that can be reached in a boiling water canner. These higher temperatures are essential to avoid the risk of deadly botulism poisoning. Processing filled jars of homemade antipasto in a pressure canner is unsuccessful because the temperature/time combinations required to eliminate the risk of botulism destroys the integrity of the vegetables resulting in a product that is almost spreadable.

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    • on May 13, 2002

      The recipe is only dangerous if you are stupid enough to make it so. This recipe is tried and true and enjoyed by hundreds of cooks for many years. Read the instructions, "Bring to a boil, stirring constantly to prevent sticking. Plce mixture IMMEDIATELY INTO HOT STERILIZED JARS, or place in containers for freezing." I think that clearly states the mixture is boiling and jars are sterilized. To clarify the proceedure, From Company's Comming, Preserves, 1996 edition. "The boiling hot food is poured into hot sterilized jars and rims wiped with a clean paper towel dipped in boiling water. Place sterilized metal lids on jars and screw metal bands on tightly." I should add that the lids and tongs used to apply the lids are taken out of boiling water as are any other utensils used. The preserves can be left to cool and store at this stage or if you wish you may put them into a boiling water bath, which in this case I have never felt it necessary. Here is further information: Sealing Jars:Processing in Boiling water bath or pressure canner. - To seal a screw top jar with metal lid, sterilize the lid in boiling water for 5 minutes and place the lid on the jar immediately after filling with the hot mixture being processed. Screw the metal band on securely, but do not tighten. Process in a boiling water bath or pressure canner. Do not retighten lids after processing jars. As jars cool, the contents in the jar contract, pulling the self sealing lid firmly aginst the jar to form a vacuum seal. And more: Open kettle canning - To seal a screw top jar with metal lid, sterilize the lid in boiling water for 5 minutes and place the lid on the jar immediately after filling with the hot mixture. Screw the medtal band on tightly, allow to cool. After the jars have cooled, check for an indentation in the lid to ensure that the jar has sealed. You may remove the medtal screw bands and store. and more: Sterilizing: Jars can be washed, rinsed and sterilized in the dishwasher. Set the dishwasher for the highest water temperature. (Mine has a setting especially for canning jars ), The jars can also be sterilized in boiling water. Wash in hot soapy water and rinse well, invert jars in 3 to 4 inches of boiling water in a large saucepan. Allow to boil for 10 minutes. Leave jars in water until you are ready to fill them. Fill jars while they are still hot. Wipe rims with clean paper towel, dipped in boiling water. Hope this helps to clear up the idea that this recipe is dangerous!! Have never heard of anyone doing pickles, antipasto, etc. in this tried and true way that have run into any trouble. Enjoy!! Dorothy

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    • on January 17, 2002

      Thank you, Thank you, Thank you! Been looking for this one for quiet a while - saw it on a cooking show went to pull it off the web & @$#^~#$% the only way to get it was order the darn book. Bless You from one who has olive oil in her blood!

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    • on November 13, 2001

      Thank you so much for that wonderfull recipe, it is more than good

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    • on March 28, 2011

      I am 42 years old & have been making antipasto for more than 20 years with my mom. We have never had a problem with botulism. The key is to follow the sterilization process to a tee. I do however suggest subsituting the 1 cup of red wine for 1 cup of red wine vinegar in order to increase the acid content. It will not affect the taste. This is great recipe and should be tried by all. Remember to purchase your ingedients on sale over a period of time to help cut the cost.

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    • on October 27, 2012

      I have canned antipasto myself and I did not have any problems. Do follow the canning instructions carefully; if it is sealed properly, you won't have problems with colour change or taste on the food you canned. These canned antipasto come so handy when you have unexpected guests. Enjoy!

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    • on October 24, 2012

      I have made a similar recipe for 25 years, but mine contains canned shrimp and red wine vinegar as well. I have never had a problem with spoilage and believe that the large amounts of ketchup and vinegar make it safe to can in a water bath canner.

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    • on December 20, 2009

      This was awesome and so easy to make. Best recipes by far. I froze in ziplock freezer bag and was great. Yum Yum Yummy

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    • on July 20, 2008

      This is very close to the Best of Bridge recipe, which I have made many times. For those who are worried about canning, be assured it's a simple and EXTREMELY rewarding way of preserving the flavour of the harvest. If you're not sure how to can, check out the canning basics tab at the Bernardin website: www.homecanning.com Canning is simple and delicious, but as in many other methods of cooking, you do have to know the safety basics.

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    • on February 06, 2008

      I agree with Chef # 722839; it is a wonderful recipe. I also would be happy if someone out there came up with a method for home preserving of this antipasto recipe. I'm not really interested in any of the vegetable only recipes for instance, and the alternative such as freezing, means that it has to be eaten immediately, or a day so after defrosting which is inconvenient. Freezing, I'm sure, will also change the texture. Any suggestions?

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    • on January 18, 2008

      It is excellent, the best I've ever had! I first tried this antipasto years ago at a Christmas party and found it to be delicious. The host got the recipe from the Georgian Bay Gourmet Cookbook. I by coincidence had a copy as well. We live in cottage country, not too far from Georgian Bay, I think the cookbook was a fundraiser of sorts. I decided this year. to make the recipe for myself and for gift giving. I used hot water bath processing and all tasted and seemed fine. By coincidence again, I came across this recipe by Derf, where the Georgian Bay cookbook origin is also mentioned. I then read the comments about the possible dangers of home canning in regard to low acid levels created by the tuna, anchovies and olives combination as used in the recipe. Not wanting to take a chance on passing botulism on to relatives and friends, I disposed of all 16 pints (about $60 in ingredients) plus all of the hard work and not to mention no more antipasto Christmas gifts. The alternative of course, is to pay the ridiculous price for the commercially made variety, President's Choice for one is identical to this recipe. The other better alternarive, would be that if someone was able to establish the proper and safe processing time, pressure and ph for using a pressure canner or other method, it would certainly alleviate the worry and concern to a lot of us who want to make this at home. Unfortunately, establishing the proper chemistry, would have to be done in a reliable test facility which I'm sure would be a bit costly. Well if anyone knows a friend of a friend etc., with contacts in a testing facility, let us know , it would be appreciated. Thanks from your Chef #722839

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    • on March 27, 2007

      This is very close to the recipe from Best of Bridge. Excellent...but instead of the tuna, I added 3 - 4 cans small shrimp, drained

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    • on December 18, 2006

      This is very close to the recipe that I have used for years. I liked the addition of the red wine, and anchovies, they add something a little different. Thanks a lot

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    • on June 19, 2004

      We love this recipe. It is absolutely delicious. The quantity was a little overwhelming however, so next time I intend to make only a half recipe. BTW, we froze it in airtight plastic containers and it held up very well for 3 months or so. It probably would have been fine much longer but we ate it all before we could find out. Thanks for an excellent recipe!

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    Nutritional Facts for Antipasto

    Serving Size: 1 (8216 g)

    Servings Per Recipe: 1

    Amount Per Serving
    % Daily Value
    Calories 513.5
     
    Calories from Fat 206
    40%
    Total Fat 22.9 g
    35%
    Saturated Fat 3.4 g
    17%
    Cholesterol 15.0 mg
    5%
    Sodium 2106.2 mg
    87%
    Total Carbohydrate 64.0 g
    21%
    Dietary Fiber 9.4 g
    37%
    Sugars 44.9 g
    179%
    Protein 17.5 g
    35%

    The following items or measurements are not included:

    pitted black olives

    anchovies

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