Total Time
Prep 0 mins
Cook 30 mins

This is the basic 'Boule' bread mix from the book "Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day" by Jeff Hertzberg and Zoe Francois. I've mainly posted this recipe so that I don't have to hook out the book every time. The dough is stored in the fridge for up to 2 weeks, taking out a bit each day as you need it, forming it and baking it. A forum I belong to love this bread, which is what inspired me to get the book. Most of them cook it in a Remoska, which is a gadget that I find invaluable. Remoska's are from Checkoslavakia, and I believe they've just come to the States. In the UK they're available from Strongly recommend getting the book, if you like this bread. They have lots of different kinds of bread which you make in this way (also sweet ones), plus ideas on how to ring the changes, recipes to use up the stale bread, etc. PS Someone said they were having difficulty getting hold of the book, so I tried to post an Amazon link for it here. But it just comes out as html gobbledey gook! If anyone knows how to do it, please let me know. Otherwise, try Amazon, guys :-) Very, very worth getting the book.

Ingredients Nutrition


  1. Preparing Dough for Storage:.
  2. Warm the water slightly. It should feel just a little warmer than body temperature. Warm water will rise the dough to the right point for storage in about 2 hours. With cold water it will need 3-4 hours.
  3. Add the yeast to the water in a 5 quart bowl or, preferably, in a resealable, lidded (not airtight) plastic food container or food-grade bucket. Don't worry about getting it all to dissolve.
  4. Mix in the flour and salt - kneading is unnecessary. Add all of the flour at once, measuring it in with dry-ingredient measuring cups, by gently scooping up the flour, then sweeping the top level with a knife or spatula. Don't press down into the flour as you scoop or you'll throw off the measurement. Mix with a wooden spoon, a high-capacity food processor (14 cups or larger) fitted with the dough attachment, or a heavy duty stand mixer fitted with the dough hook until the mixture is uniform. If you're hand mixing and it becomes too difficult to incorporate all the flour with the spoon, you can reach into your mixing vessel with very wet hands and press the mixture together. Don't knead, it isn't necessary. You're finished when everything is uniformly moist, without dry patches. It takes a few minutes, and will yield a dough that is wet and loose enough to conform to the shape of its container.
  5. Allow to rise. Cover with lid (not airtight or it could explode the lid off). Allow the mixture to rise at room temperature until it begins to collapse (or at least flattens on the top), approx 2 hours, depending on room temperature, and initial water temperature Longer rising times, up to 5 hours, won't harm the result.
  6. You can use a portion of the dough any time after this period. Fully refrigerated dough is less sticky and easier to work with than dough at room temperature.
  7. On Baking Day:.
  8. prepare your loaf tin, tray, or whatever you're baking it in/on. Sprinkle the surface of your refrigerated dough with four. Pull up and cut of a grapefruit-size piece of dough (c 1 lb), using a serrated knife.
  9. Hold the mass of dough in your hands and add a little more flour as needed so it won't stick to your hands. Gently stretch the surface of the dough around to the bottom on all 4 sides, rotating the ball a quarter-turn as you go. Most of the dusting flour will fall off - that's fine, it isn't meant to be incorporated. The bottom of the loaf may appear to be a collection of bunched ends, but it will sort itself out during resting and baking.
  10. The correctly shaped final product will be smooth and cohesive. The entire process should take no more than 30 - 60 seconds.
  11. Rest the loaf and let it rise in the form, on the tray/pizza peel, for about 40 minutes Depending on the age of the dough, you may not see much rise during this period. That's fine, more rising will occur during baking.
  12. Twenty minutes before baking, preheat the oven to 450°F Place an empty broiler tray for holding water on any other shelf that won't interfere with the rising bread.
  13. Dust and Slash. Dust the top of the loaf liberally with flour, which will allow the slashing knife to pass without sticking. Slash a quarter inch deep cross, diagonal lines, or tic-tac-toe pattern on top using a serrated knife.
  14. After a 20 min preheat you're ready to bake, even though the oven thermometer won't be at full temperature yet. Put your loaf in the oven. Pour about 1 cup of hot water (from the tap) into the broiler tray and close the oven to trap the steam.
  15. Bake for about 30 minutes, or until the crust is nicely browned and firm to the touch.
  16. Store the rest of the dough in the fridge in your lidded (not airtight) container and use it over the next 14 days. The flavour and texture improves, becoming like sourdough. Even 24 hours of storage improves the flavour.
  17. This is the standard bread. There are loads of variations - both savory and sweet - in the book.
Most Helpful

I'm in love with this method and recipe. It takes a minimum of effort for great bread several times a week. I used weight instead of volume for better control (32.6 oz AP flour, 25.6 oz water, 0.49 oz active yeast, 0.88 oz kosher salt). I also used whole wheat flour for 25% of the total flour by weight).

Red Apple Guy October 10, 2009

I just finished making 8 loaves for the first time. One recipe I replaced 1 cup of whole wheat flour for the white. It gave me a heavier but hearty loaf. Excellent. Hard not to eat a whole loaf at one time. This really needs the frig for at least 3 hours to be workable. As it was cool, I let it raise more than the 40 min. suggested. I also turned it several times to stretch the gluten as Cooks Illustrated suggested. I knew what I was looking for. I will never return to the old way of making yeast bread again as this recipe is heaven. Please follow the exact measurements. I use a cookies sheet that is sprayed with oil and sprinkled with cornmeal. Also sprayed the loafs with water the last 5 min. Fantastic.....Gave it to 12 cooks who also said, Fantastic

joanwgessner February 07, 2010

I made this last week on a Friday & the dough was finished off by Tuesday! The only change i made was i used bleached ap flour instead of unbleached. I think the effect it had was possibly just the color of the had a somewhat grayish tint to still tasted great, though. Mixing the dough by hand was easy enough...though, i recommend using a round container...all i had that was big enough was a square 8qt food container from sams club.I used the cast iron dutch oven method to bake it & the crust was awesome...

eavey May 17, 2013