Recipe Sifter

X
  • Start Here
    • Course
    • Main Ingredient
    • Cuisine
    • Preparation
    • Occasion
    • Diet
    • Nutrition
1

Select () or exclude () categories to narrow your recipe search.

2

As you select categories, the number of matching recipes will update.

Make some selections to begin narrowing your results.
  • Calories
  • Amount per serving
    1. Total Fat
    2. Saturated Fat
    3. Polyunsat. Fat
    4. Monounsat. Fat
    5. Trans Fat
  • Cholesterol
  • Sodium
  • Potassium
  • Total Carbohydrates
    1. Dietary Fiber
    2. Sugars
  • Protein
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin B6
  • Vitamin B12
  • Vitamin C
  • Calcium
  • Iron
  • Vitamin E
  • Magnesium
  • Alcohol
  • Caffeine
  • Find exactly what you're looking for with the web's most powerful recipe filtering tool.

    You are in: Home / Kitchen Dictionary Entry
    Lost? Site Map

    Kitchen Dictionary: amla

    Amla is the fruit of a small, deciduous tree grown all over India. The fruit is round in shape, pale green and translucent. It has a fine, glossy skin and crunchy, crispy flesh. The aroma is sour and it tastes acidic and leaves the teeth tingling if bitten into. Amla can be used fresh or dried. Dried amlas are sometimes ground. Amla is prized both for its high vitamin C content and for the precious oil extracted from its seeds and pulp (used as a treatment for hair and scalp problems). Amla oil, one of the world's oldest natural hair conditioners, is prepared from dried amla berries which have been soaked in coconut oil for several days.

    Ethnicity: Indian Ingredient

    Season: available year-round

    More Amla Recipes
    Advertisement

    Nutrition Facts

    Calculated for 1
    Amount Per Serving %DV
    Calories 0
    Calories from Fat (%)
    Total Fat 0.0g %
    Saturated Fat 0.0g %
    Monounsaturated Fat 0.0g
    Polyunsaturated Fat 0.0g
    Trans Fat 0.0g
    Cholesterol 0mg %
    Sodium 0mg %
    Potassium 0mg %
    Total Carbohydrate 0.0g %
    Dietary Fiber 0.0g %
    Sugars 0.0g
    Protein 0.0g %

    How is this calculated?

    Advertisement

    Over 475,000 Recipes

    Food.com Network of Sites