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    Supported Measurements

    As cooks we are very respectful of proper measurements, especially when it comes to baking. We have done our best to make Recipezaar understand just about every measurement unit out there, as well as make it easy to convert any recipe from US to metric and back.

    In the process, we have learned a lot about how chefs around the world measure differently. When a European chef calls for a "cup" they are referring to a standard coffee cup, not the strict 8 oz cup used in the US system. Furthermore, Europeans usually use weight measurements instead of volume in recipes, and most kitchens are equiped with a scale which is quite uncommon in the US. We are looking at ways to make differences like these work and coexist.

    If you have other cooking measurement lore, any measurements we have missed, or features we could add, please let us know.

    UnitUsesNotes
    bagbag
    bags
    When the ingredient comes in a bag, as in "1 bag of tortilla chips"; often with another measurement for the box, as in "1 (12 oz) bag of tortilla chips"
    bigbigUsed when you are specifying a large item, such as a "10 big apples" or a "1 big pepper".
    bottlebottle
    bottles
    When the ingredient comes in a bottle
    boxbox
    boxes
    When the ingredient comes in a box, as in "1 box of frozen spinach"; often with another measurement for the box, as in "1 (7 oz) box of frozen spinach".
    bunchbunch
    bunches
    As in a "1 bunch of cilantro"
    cancan
    cans
    For ingredients that come in cans, such as beans. For example, "1 can (10 oz.) of beans". Note that it is greatly appreciated if you also specify the size of the can. This makes it more clear to those who aren't as sure what you mean. Put the size of the can in parentheses between the word "can" and the ingredient.
    cartoncarton
    cartons
    When the ingredient comes in a carton, as in "1 carton of cream"; often with another measurement for the carton, as in "1 (8 oz) carton of cream".
    containercontainer
    containers
    When the ingredient comes in a container, as in "1 container of strawberries"; often with another measurement for the container, as in "1 (16 oz) container of strawberries".
    countcountWhen the ingredient is simply counted.
    cupc
    cs
    cp
    cps
    cup
    cups
    The very common "cup". As in "1 cup sugar".
    centimetercm
    centimeter
    When the ingredient should be measured by legth. 1/100 of a meter.
    cloveclove
    cloves
    As in a clove of garlic, not the clove as in the spice. Recipezaar is smart enough to distinguish between these.
    dashdash
    dashes
    Just a bit of the ingredient. This isn't an exact measurement, but people will know what you mean.
    dozendozenUsed when the ingredient comes in dozens, such as eggs. So you'd say "2 dozen eggs". DO NOT use "dozen" as a count of the ingredient, such as "dozen apples". For that, say "1 dozen apples".
    dropdropAs in "4 drops red food coloring".
    earear
    ears
    For ears of corn. That's about all this is used for.
    envelopeenvelope
    envelopes
    When the ingredient comes in envelopes as a package. Yeast is a good example. Here it's also helpful to specify the size of the envelope, like "1 oz.". And you put that in parentheses between "envelope" and the ingredient like so: "1 envelope (1 oz.) yeast"
    fluid ouncefl oz
    fluid ounce
    gallongal
    gals
    gallon
    gallons
    glassglass
    glasses
    A glass, typically 3.5 ozs. But it's best to be more exact and say 3.5 ounces so that you don't risk confusing people.
    gramg
    gram
    grams
    The metric unit of weight measure.
    headhead
    heads
    As in a "head of garlic" or "head of lettuce".
    inch"
    in
    inch
    inches
    The friendly English measure of length. Not used terribly often in recipes, but comes in handy when you want to specify the length of something like string or a stick of cinnamon.
    jarjar
    jars
    Some ingredients come in jars as opposed to cans. Again, it's very helpful to specify the size of the jar and put it in parentheses between "jar" and the ingredient. For example, "1 jar (12 oz.) maraschino cherries".
    kilogramkg
    kilo
    kgram
    kilogram
    kilograms
    The metric measurement of weight. 1 kg=1000 grams. Use this for big and heavy ingredients.
    largelargeSame as "big" (above). Use whichever you're most comfortable with.
    poundlb
    lbs
    pound
    pounds
    The English measurement of weight. 1 pound=16 oz.
    leafleaf
    leaves
    For things such as cabbage, i.e., "6 leaves of cabbage".
    linklink
    links
    For sausages, i.e., "6 links of chicken sausage".
    literl
    liter
    liters
    Metric liquid measurement, just a bit more than a quart.
    loafl
    loaf
    loaves
    For bread, as in "1 loaf of french bread".
    mediummed
    medium
    Same as "big" or "large" except less in size. For example, "3 medium apples".
    medium-sizedmed-sized
    medium-sized
    For example, "3 medium-sized apples".
    milliliterml
    milliliter
    milliliters
    Metric liquid measurement. 1 milliliter=1/1000 liters.
    ounceoz
    ozs
    ounce
    ounces
    packagepk
    pack
    package
    packages
    When the ingredient comes in a package, as in "1 package of rice noodles; often with another measurement for the package, as in "1 (8 oz) package of rice noodles".
    piecepiece
    pieces
    When the ingredient is simply counted in pieces, as in "4 pieces baking chocolate".
    pinchpinch
    pinches
    Similar to a dash, but this is literally what you can pinch between your thumb and finger (any finger you like.
    pintpt
    pint
    pints
    Also an English measurement, most notably for beer, as in "20 pints of Guinness"!
    packagepkg
    pkgs
    package
    packages
    Use this for ingredients that come in a specific package, any kind of package, such as cheese. It's up to you to use "package" rather than specify the size, but if you do use "package", please specify the size as well in parenthese between "package" and the ingredient. Example: "1 package (6 oz.) cheddar cheese".
    packetpkt
    packet
    Just like "package"(above). Using either is a matter of personal preference. But please follow the suggestion as with "package" (see above).
    quartqt
    quart
    quarts
    scoopscoop
    scoops
    When the ingredient is scooped, as in "2 scoops vanilla ice cream".
    sheetsheet
    sheets
    sliceslice
    slices
    When the ingredient comes in slices, as in "4 slices bread".
    smallsmall
    sprigsprig
    springs
    Used for ingredients that come in "sprigs", like cilantro, parsley, etc.
    stalkstalk
    stalks
    Like a sprig, but appropriate for such things as celery.
    stickstick
    sticks
    When the ingredient comes in sticks, as in "1 stick of butter".
    stripstrip
    strips
    For anything that can be specified in strips, like "2 strips of bacon".
    tastetasteAn unspecified amount, suitable to the chef.
    tablespoonT
    tbl
    tbls
    tblsp
    tbs
    tbsp
    tbsps
    tablespoon
    tablespoons
    There's many ways to abbreviate this common measurement...almost any way you can imagine
    teaspoont
    tsp
    tsps
    teaspoon
    teaspoons
    There's almost as many ways to abbreviate this common measurement.
    wholewholeThis is used to specify the entire ingredient, such as "1 whole garlic head".
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