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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / ZWT - Dutch
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    ZWT - Dutch


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    A simple and tasty breakfast/brunch treat. This is an adopted recipe from the RecipeZaar account, and I am delighted to be the new owner of such a winning recipe. If you would like the inside of the finished dish to be a little less "egg-y" then cut the number of eggs down to 3, and many many reviewers also found that just 3 Tablespoons of butter worked better for them. Either way they did it, they all agreed that the taste was great. Enjoy!

    Recipe #45609

    For a "team-building" day I went with colleagues to a Delft Chocolate shop where they hand make everything and they gave us lessons! Afterward I tried a cookbook Ganache recipe and it didn't work so I went back to this shop and they gave me the quantities that we'd used in our lesson and it works very well indeed ! NOTE: I have been making these recently using my silicone ice cube moulds, and they work FANTASTICALLY! (the smaller forms work best)...they are soft and flexible enough to make these really easily and it saves the fiddly business of having to peel away the mini muffin papers off the cocolates later too. I find that we like more liqueur in ours as the flavour as I was given it was not pronounced enough for us. I sometimes use white chocolate for my filling and add a few drops of red or yellow food colour to make a creamy pink or yellow filling, with or without strawberry, lemon or banana flavouring inside a dark chocolate outside case. Please see my step-by-step photos for further reference on assembling these. 200g = 7 1/8 oz, 120g = 4 1/4 oz, 60g = 2.1 oz, 140g = 5 oz, 25g = 7/8 oz. Yield depends on the size and shape of your silicone ice-cube forms.

    Recipe #81699

    Taken from a little community cookbook "Cooking on Clogs" that has some great family recipes compiled by Dutch ladies especially for when they pined for typical Dutch recipes and treats that were not available to them shop-bought when they emmigrated to other countries. I like the fact that these recipes don't have all the added preservatives of their commercial counterparts and are easy to make. Boterbabbelaars are a small toffee candy, if you like your toffee chewy then this is one for you:) Note: Treacle is called Molasses by North Americans. ZWT REGION: The Netherlands.

    Recipe #195523

    Taken from a little community cookbook "Cooking on Clogs" that has some great family recipes compiled by Dutch ladies especially for when they pined for typical Dutch recipes and treats that were not available to them shop-bought when they emmigrated to other countries. These should be little tiny balls... about the size of the top joint of your little finger.. and when cooled you mix them with sweets (candy) that is hard and very sugary and THIS mix is what Sint Nicolas's helpers Zwarte Piet(s) throw at children when they make their "surprise" visit to families with the Big Red Book on the 5th of December. NOTE: If you have access to commercially mixed Speculaas kruiden (spices) then you could use 2 3/4 teaspoons of that instead of the individual spices listed. ZWT REGION: The Netherlands.

    Recipe #195547

    Taken from a little community cookbook "Cooking on Clogs" that has some great family recipes compiled by Dutch ladies especially for when they pined for typical Dutch recipes and treats that were not available to them shop-bought when they emmigrated to other countries. I like the fact that these cookies don't just specify the vague ingredient "speculaas kruiden" (spices) but actually tell you how to make the spice mix from scratch. Each region and many local bakers within regions had their own, often highly prized and highly secret mixture of spices,and competition between then to have the most popular was fierce. These differ from my other Speculaas recipe in that they contain aniseed and ginger in the mix, and also that they do not contain ground almonds within the cookie mixture, but feature slivered almonds on the top so they are more like the giant decorative speculaas that you will find in Dutch shops from late November in the run up to Sint Nicolas on December 5th. ZWT REGION: The Netherlands.

    Recipe #195564

    Taken from a little community cookbook "Cooking on Clogs" that has some great family recipes compiled by Dutch ladies especially for when they pined for typical Dutch recipes and treats that were not available to them shop-bought when they emigrated to other countries. I like the fact that these cookies don't just specify the vague ingredient "speculaas kruiden" (spices) but actually tell you how to make the spice mix from scratch. These cookies available year round in NL but the large, often highly decorative cookies, often made to a regional or local spekulaas spice recipes that are the cooks closely guarded secret, and often topped with slivered almonds, make their appearance in late November in the run up to Saint Nicolas on December 5th. Cooking time includes refrigeration time and yield is a total guess because it depends entirely how large you choose to make your cookies :) ZWT REGION: The Netherlands.

    Recipe #195583

    Another totally different recipe for a very old fashioned Dutch fudge called Borstplaat, and is posted to aid a request looking for a long lost family recipe... This one is so very different from my first one that I have posted it as well. I have no idea which of the two is more traditional, maybe these are regional differences? personally I don't know how half set fudge can be set on it's side but I have given the directions exactly translated as given and will amend this when I have had a chance to make this myself. ZWT REGION: The Netherlands.

    Recipe #197823

    This is a recipe for a very old fashioned Dutch fudge called Borstplaat, and is posted to aid a request looking for a long lost family recipe... it comes from a small community dutch cookbook made by ladies who went to New Zealand between 1940 and 1970 and pooled information about all their favourite dutch recipes, substitutions etc becuase they couldn't get specialised ingredients from "home". No measurement was given for the butter so I have started with 2 Tablespoons and will increase/decrease it once I have made this myself, ditto the 1 Tablespoon of flavouring essence... if you make it before I do, I would appreciate any info on more precise quantities. The recipe also only states 'essence" and not what flavour, I added "almond" becuase otherwise the Zaar computer turns it into Spice essence LOL, Serving size is a total guesstimate so that the recipe could be uploaded. Again, once made, I will amend the recipe. ZWT REGION: The Netherlands.

    Recipe #197756

    This one uses the Speculaas spice mix that is usually uses for cookies. The recipe is adapted from the AH supermarket chain magazine. It's an appetizer, and I think would be nice served with a selection of things on toothpicks. I'm not sure if you have a name for ketjap manis in English but it's an Indonesian sweet soya sauce and sambal badjak is a hot indonesian sauce made from chilies and onions. The spices mentioned are supposed to be Speculaaskruiden which is a spice mix powder for cookies and I will update the recipe as soon as I can get it added to the Kitchen dictionary.

    Recipe #244395

    When Dutch young people between the ages of 2 and 99 get up in the morning, this is often the breakfast of choice. It's very very traditional in the Netherlands and here we have Vlokken and Hagelslag in many variations of colours, textures and flavours. What is it, you might ask? well the most basic one looks like the little chocolate bits used in cake decoration LOL, but here it's served up on bread (NEVER toast) for breakfast. If you are really Dutch and/or really brave you eat it as an open sandwich, to the untrained in the art of Hagelslag this can result in more of the chocolate bits on the floor than in your mouth, so beginners might perfer to add an extra slice of bread on the top to keep everything in a little better. Use margarine or slightly softened butter on the bread to help keep everything in place too. For the "quantity" of hagel I have been conservative but for Dutch kids the rule of thumb is: get as much on as you think you can get away with! Enjoy!

    Recipe #278713

    I have experimented with this until I'm finally happy with it... no, delighted with it. I use chicken breasts because it saves the hassle of picking out the bones, bonus time saver. It makes a great chicken basis for fillings such as: chicken pastry pies, chicken ragout, chicken pasta and chicken potato dishes, and if followed until Step 9, also for my Chicken lasagne recipe... I use this to get great healthy and hearty flavour without too much time and effort. It makes a lot, but it freezes well.. if it ever gets that far because it never takes long to disappear ! My not-so-fussed-on-chicken-DH actually likes this too. The recipe is so much easier and illogically, faster... if you start it the night before (I have this on while I'm cooking dinner, then let it cool, refrigerate the lot overnight and next day all you have to do is discard any fat and the rest is easyville) If you have spring onions or leeks or zucchini that need using then throw them in as well. The instructions are long, but mega easy. Cooking time includes overnight refrigeration time. ZWT REGION: The Netherlands.

    Recipe #195716

    This recipe uses my Recipe# 195716 "Pressure Cooker Chicken Fillets, Basis for Savory Pies Etc" as a basis for preparing the chicken. I'm trying to eat a little healthier and like that this recipe contains no "cream of..." soups or milk or cream so the fat and calories are lower than some of my more decadent lasagnas. This whips up in next to no time because most of the work has been done while in the preparation of the chicken stage. I also like this because just adding peas makes a quick and simple weekday meal, and any preferred veggies can be either added to the mix before putting it into the oven or served alongside. Best of all, if you are on a budget or have people to feed that seemingly have hollow legs, the chicken mixture can easily be padded out with a heap of veggies and it still tastes great. Preparation time assumes that you have pre- made recipe Pressure Cooker Chicken Fillets. ZWT REGION: The Netherlands.

    Recipe #196054

    This is a recipe that I threw together on the spur of the moment one day and was amazed at how tasty, easy and healthy is was. It's now in demand at our place and with guests. Please DON'T be afraid of the amount of mint.. it makes the dish. I don't use butter or salt or pepper, so far the flavours of the sugar snaps and the mint together have totally been enough. This is not a dish that does well standing on a buffet table for ages... best made literally in 2 minutes when guests are seated and served piping hot to their plates.(or you can stand in the kitchen and eat the lot ! LOL) ZWT REGION: The Netherlands.

    Recipe #201965

    Half of my extended family are vegetarian and many soups and sauces call for vegetable stock... and shop bought is a) unavailable here and b) stock cubes seem full of salt and preservatives. I make my own vegetable stock and freeze it so that I have plenty on hand when making vegetarian soups, lasagnes etc. I use small handfuls of fresh herbs, throw in what you have to hand and don't be afraid to be generous with the amounts. If you have veggies that need using up like cauliflower, green beans, broccoli etc throw them in too for the extra flavour. Yield depends on the capacity of your pressure cooker. ZWT REGION: The Netherlands.

    Recipe #202061

    This is a recipe adapted from a book called Quick and Healthy Recipes and Ideas, where I have been looking for lower fat, sodium and calories without sacrificing taste. Imitation crab can be used but look for ones with as short as an ingredient list as possible to avoid many of the extra preservatives etc. Fresh crab has significantly less sodium than imitation. ZWT REGION: The Netherlands.

    Recipe #207352

    My Dad's been preparing Rabbit recipes ever since he bred "show" rabbits as a kid in Holland... the ones who didn't make the grade went into the pot (9 kids in the family - nothing wasted!)This one I grew up with in New Zealand. I make it here in Holland now but farmed bunnies seem to need more herbs to give them flavour.

    Recipe #74586

    Boy, do we loves potatoes and spinach. When I came across this recipe from Gourmet from 2001, I had to make it, and darn, if it isn't GREAT! I have made a few adaptations, but this is pretty close to the original.Cooks Notes: You may wish to substitute the heavy cream with 1 or 2% milk, I have even used non fat sour cream and thrown in a few cloves of roasted garlic. ZWT REGION: The Netherlands.

    Recipe #147243


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