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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / ZWT -- Asia
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    14 recipes in

    ZWT -- Asia


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    This is one of those recipes that everyone should know. It tastes terrible, but it works miracles. It is designed to keep people hydrated. It was created by Canadian researchers. UNICEF embraced it, and a commercial version is now distributed widely (mostly free of charge). Each year it is credited with saving the lives of at least a million children. I lived in the Middle East, Africa and Southeast Asia and it was a Godsend in all locations. A litre and a quart are about the same in size. The ingredient list includes some options to make this taste better, but I have found that people who really need it, think it tastes okay as is. Don't use all the options -- just one. Also, please don't review on taste -- review on results. Namely -- did the user not have to go to hospital to be rehydrated.

    Recipe #230966

    I had the two main ingredients on hand, and decided to get creative. We are big lovers of sesame oil. Everyone was pleased with the results, so I thought I'd post this before I forgot it. I served with this warm hokkien noodles, but rice would be fine, too.

    Recipe #349302

    This salty-sour concoction appears on every table in Vietnam, and is used as freely as salt and pepper. As an all-purpose condiment, it gets splashed, drizzled or sloshed over all types of dishes. You can make it ahead, and it keeps well in the fridge for several days.

    Recipe #420383

    Chilli jam is a very popular item in Australia. My hubby even likes it on his vanilla and/or chocolate ice cream. I finally came up with this recipe -- that is easy-to-make, and not too hot and not sweet. The fish sauce gives the flavour an Asian twist. As an aside, my tablespoon is equal to 3 teaspoons. For a hotter result, you can leave the seeds in the chillies, or simply use more.

    Recipe #421053

    This started its life as a recipe for a beef and noodle salad—served cold, but because of missing ingredients and my general forgetfulness, I arrived at this dish. It was gobbled up by all present—even the very fussy 96-year-old. I've posted the recipe here because the guests who ate it want to recreate it. It's tasty and fast to make—and not too spicy. It's also versatile. You can double or triple it, and you can leave out ingredients, add extra ones and even switch from beef to chicken. Oyster sauce is sweet, so be careful about adding the brown sugar, too.

    Recipe #199251

    Twenty-plus years ago, a sister introduced me to this recipe -- from a 1977 Better Homes and Gardens Oriental Cookbook. The original version (which my sister follows faithfully) is very similar to Kimke's Recipe #31632. Here is my version, which I think is different enough to be sent in and enjoyed. It is saucier. Also, our past exchange students want to refer to my version.

    Recipe #202087

    This is my third attempt at a main dish recipe for RSC#9. My tasters gave the other two recipes four stars. This one got five. It has been inspired by recipes from Brazil and Malaysia. There are a lot of ingredients and steps, but it really is a chop-it-up and throw-together dish. You can make it without the palm oil. This ingredient is common in northern Brazil. It gives food a special flavour and colour. There is no substitute. You can find it in markets that specialise in Brazilian imports. The recipe works without it (I tried it that way on purpose), but if you can get it, palm oil is a wonderful addition. UPDATE: Many thanks to those who reviewed this for RSC#9. Soon after posting it, I realised I forgot to mention the lemon juice. Oops! It's here now and I hope you still like it both ways. :-)

    Recipe #211592

    Okay, Annelien, you can back off now! Oops, sorry, I was just having a conversation with a former exchange student who has been pressuring me to get this posted. I hope she leaves a review. :-) As an aside, this recipe has been adapted from one that 'whizzed by' on TV one day. I think it 'belongs' to Janelle Bloom.

    Recipe #243610

    This mild and flavourful dish comes from Julie Sahni's 1980 book, Classic Indian Cookery. She adapted it from a dish served at the Akbar India Restaurant in New York City (which I think is now closed). I am posting this for some former exchange students who are going through severe Kabuli withdrawal. I often make this a day in advance. A few comments. I think Julie Sahni writes some of the clearest recipes on the planet -- and she does so without being patronising. Check out her books (and note that I have abbreviated some instructions slightly). Also, I wonder if Kabuli means the recipe is influenced by dishes from Kabul, Afghanistan. Finally, I have never timed this accurately, so the prep time is a bit of a guess.

    Recipe #245052

    This recipe has been slightly tweaked from one by Katsuyo Kobayashi, Japan's favourite TV cooking show host and an Iron Chef winner. It is so easy to make, but to ensure plenty of flavour, use the best quality tomatoes you can get. If possible, make it ahead and refrigerate for at least an hour to let the flavours blend. This doesn't seem to keep well, so eat it the day you make it.

    Recipe #253459

    This crunchy salad is from my friend, Louie. The dressing keeps very well in the cupboard, and the quantities for it shown here are enough for three or four batches of salad. The cooking time includes toasting the almonds and pine nuts. Jen -- a reviewer -- is right. This salad is better if it is dressed a while before it is served. But wait to add the crispy noodles just before serving. Leftovers of this get a bit soggy overnight, but are still quite nice the next day.

    Recipe #258675

    This dark, flavourful chilli sauce is a good accompaniment for rich Thai dishes. It is from David Thompson's authoritative book, Thai Food. Yield and prep and cooking times are approximate. Posted to serve with Recipe #269446, which was requested in the Asian Forum.

    Recipe #269411

    Haw Muslim traders from the south of China probably brought this dish to Chiang Mai (in northern Thailand). This version is based on one in David Thompson's authoritative book, Thai Food, and is posted in response to a request in the Asian Forum. Thompson says, 'The best noodles to use are the somewhat flat egg noodles, about 1/2-centimetre (1/4-inch) wide. Deep fry a few of them in very hot, clean oil to use as a garnish, but be careful -- they splatter as they expand and become crisp.' He also says that beef can be used in place of chicken. Preparation and cooking times are guesses. Recipe #269411 is supposed to be a nice complement to this.

    Recipe #269446

    I was lucky to live in Burma for several years in the 1980s. I was even luckier to have Wah Htoo working in my home. She is the best cook of Burmese food I've ever met. Her version of this soup is famous in Rangoon. Once a Burmese guest at our table called Wah Htoo out of the kitchen to tip her -- the only way he knew to convey how impressed he was with her cooking. Of course, I never got that recipe from Wah Htoo. But after many attempts, I think even Wah Htoo would be proud of this effort. This is a mellow, rather than a spicy, recipe. Add plenty of the crushed dried chilies for heat. Note: Burmese chickens get a lot of exercise -- they are tough, but full of flavour. Please use free range, organic chicken thighs if you can get them (a small whole, free-range chicken also works -- cut into 10-12 pieces and with or without skin). Also resist the temptation to play around with this. Trust me, I've played around with it for ages -- trying to get it just right. Finally -- don't let the number of ingredients or steps deter you. This really is easy to make.

    Recipe #283434


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