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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / ZWT 4 - My South & Central American Recipes
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    14 recipes in

    ZWT 4 - My South & Central American Recipes


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    A wonderful & quick recipe from Michael Cordúa, a 1994 Best New Chef, now chef-owner of Churrascos, Amazon and Américas in Houston. SERVE WITH: Tomato salad.

    Recipe #133817

    I adore empanadas. Empanadas are a ubiquitous snack in Argentina. Rosa Angelita Castro de Flores learned to make these from her mother, Sara Julia Castro, who came from the northern province of Catamarca. She shared this recipe with Saveur Magazine. Time does not include chill time. You can save time and use pastry sheets if you need to. Also, I do not particularly like raisins so I omit them.

    Recipe #138705

    This marinade is for rotisserie chicken, but you can also marinade chicken parts (even boneless skinless breasts!) and cook in oven or on grill. It’s deliciously lemony and garlicky. A bit of vinegar makes it even brighter-tasting. Great paired with a fruity Argentinian Malbec.

    Recipe #223218

    I love Yucca fries! I must have eaten a whole field full while in Costa Rica. If you are looking for something different, give yucca a try! You can also mix yucca fries with sweet potato fries (fried separately) for a great combination and beautiful plate. SERVE WITH: Cowboy Steaks With Onions Recipe #153370 . MAKE AHEAD: The boiled yucca can be refrigerated for up to 2 days before using for this recipe.

    Recipe #153368

    Caipirinha is the national drink of Brazil. The drink is made with cachaça (pronounced - kuh-sha-suh). It is technically a brandy and a member of the aguardente family. There is an old adage in Brazil: "quanto pior a cachaça, melhor a caipirinha" –– the worse the cachaça, the better the caipirinha. The name caipirinha is derived from the Portuguese word caipira (hick, hayseed, country bumpkin, rube, etc.) coupled with the -inha suffix (a diminutive denoting little or small) and can be roughly translated as little hick, little hayseed, little country bumpkin, little rube, etc., etc. Poor man’s drink or not, cachaça has become an integral part of Brazilian culture and its significance ranks right up there with soccer/football (futebol), carnival and samba as Brazilian national icons. The Brazilians like it sweet.... VERY sweet. In Brazil, the very best caipirinhas are made with "limões gallegos" –– what in the U.S. is often referred to as a key lime. Can also be made by the pitcher!

    Recipe #243468

    Rich guava juice and sweet raspberry liqueur makes this Central American favorite a popular pool side beverage.

    Recipe #304496

    Pisco is a clear brandy that is popular in both Peru and Chile. The white muscat grapes, from which pisco is distilled, were first grown in Peru by the Spaniards in the 16th century (at that time Peru & Chile were both part of Spain’s American empire.) When they became independent countries, both claimed the liquor as their own. Therefore the national drink of both Peru and Chile, is the rich “Pisco Sour.” However there is a difference in sweetness and the citrus used between the two countries’ piscos. I have posted both recipes so be sure to try the Recipe #243479 as well. Note: Egg whites are sometimes used in chilean pisco sours as well, but for the purist, they will say it is unnecessary adornment.

    Recipe #243483

    Pisco is a clear brandy that is popular in both Peru and Chile. The white muscat grapes, from which pisco is distilled, were first grown in Peru by the Spaniards in the 16th century (at that time Peru & Chile were both part of Spain’s American empire.) When they became independent countries, both claimed the liquor as their own. Therefore the national drink of both Peru and Chile, is the rich “Pisco Sour.” However there is a difference in sweetness and the fruit used between the two countries’ piscos. I have posted both recipes so be sure to try the Chilean Pisco Sour as well.

    Recipe #243479

    I love when I get a salad at a restaurant that is garnished with Hearts of Palm. I often see the cans in the grocery store and am tempted to grab one, but never do for fear that I wont use it. This is a typical salad, side dish or appetizer from Central America that uses this wonderful ingredient. Since the absorbency of the hearts of palm varies from batch to batch you may need more or less of the olive oil. If making as a salad spoon on top a bed of mixed greens.

    Recipe #170418

    This quick gooey bread pudding made with caramel-like dulce de leche from Latin America is so much more than the sum of its five parts. This recipe originates from Grace Parisi, the test kitchen wizard of Food and Wine. The author suggests throwimg in a handful of fresh or frozen raspberries or blueberries before baking for even more flavor. The Crème Anglaise can overcook and curdle. Grace prevents this by preparing a cold-water bath and setting it near the stove before she even cracks an egg.

    Recipe #138624

    Tisana is a fabulous party drink from Venezuela. It is fruity and light and traditionally served without alcohol at children's birthday celebrations. It is easy to make ahead of time, and it keeps refrigerated in a pitcher. If making for children simply substitute wine with Sprite or 7-UP.

    Recipe #304534

    A popular snack in the Caribbean, plantain chips are called mariquitas in Cuba, trompetas in the Dominican Republic, and chicharitos de plátano verde in Costa Rica. Versions also exist in India, where the chips are often cooked in coconut oil, and Southeast Asia, where it is common to rub them with turmeric and salt before frying.

    Recipe #138707

    The grated plantain in this coastal Ecuadoran soup gives the dish a wonderfully light and creamy body. Tiny and virtually flavorless, annatto seeds, also known as achiote seeds, are commonly used throughout Latin America to add a distinctive reddish yellow color to sautéed foods. They are available in Latin markets and the Latin section of some supermarkets. At Zafra, Chef Maricel Presilla accents her Ecuadoran chowders, as well as grilled chicken and fish, with this crisp salsa. To turn up the heat, add 1 finely chopped fresh chile, such as cayenne or serrano. This delicious recipe is from Food & Wine, May 2001. MAKE AHEAD: The Annatto Oil can be refrigerated in a tightly sealed jar for up to 2 months. The salsa can be refrigerated for up to 3 days. Note: Please check refrigeration times in the instructions, they are not included in prep or cook time.

    Recipe #138627

    This drink tastes like lightly spiked chocolate milk with cinnamon. The drink actually calls for guarana powder, which comes from a berry grown in Brazil and Venezuela and is sold in heath food stores as an energy supplement. The drink is good with it or without it, so don't worry if you cannot find it.

    Recipe #304537


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