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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / Zaar-Tastes from Africa!
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    204 recipes in

    Zaar-Tastes from Africa!

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    Fresh pineapple and coconut are some of the main ingredients in Caribbean(and assuredly in authentic Antigua and Barbuda cuisine). Here they get pureed to a smooth and creamy deliciousness! Adapted from a recipe by Vegetarian Times magazine.

    Recipe #507250

    Sweet crunchy corn gets a little kick with this zesty corn topper.

    Recipe #503299

    This vibrant spice blend makes an excellent addition to lamb burgers, rice, vegetarian dishes, or roasted chicken. Store in an airtight container in a cool, dark, dry place. From epicurious.com

    Recipe #503236

    Flavoursome and affordable mushrooms have all the attributes of a superfood - nutrient-rich, high in antioxidants.

    Recipe #502991

    Preserved lemons, sold loose in the souks, are one of the indispensable ingredients of Moroccan cooking, used in fragrant lamb and vegetable tagines, recipes for chicken with lemons and olives , and salads. Their unique pickled taste and special silken texture cannot be duplicated with fresh lemon or lime juice, despite what some food writers have said. In Morocco they are made with a mixture of fragrant-skinned doqq and tart boussera lemons, but I have had excellent luck with American lemons from Florida and California. Moroccan Jews have a slightly different procedure for pickling, which involves the use of olive oil, but this recipe, which includes optional herbs (in the manner of Safi), will produce a true Moroccan preserved-lemon taste. The important thing in preserving lemons is to be certain they are completely covered with salted lemon juice. With my recipe you can use the lemon juice over and over again. (As a matter of fact, I keep a jar of used pickling juice in the kitchen, and when I make Bloody Marys or salad dressings and have half a lemon left over, I toss it into the jar and let it marinate with the rest.) Use wooden utensils to remove the lemons as needed. Sometimes you will see a sort of lacy, white substance clinging to preserved lemons in their jar; it is perfectly harmless, but should be rinsed off for aesthetic reasons just before the lemons are used. Preserved lemons are rinsed, in any case, to rid them of their salty taste. Cook with both pulps and rinds, if desired. The recipe and introductory text below are excerpted from Paula Wolfert's book Couscous and Other Good Food From Morocco.

    Recipe #502986

    Burkina Faso, also known by its short-form name Burkina, is a landlocked country in west Africa. The tea is called Bissap a La Bonne Dame in Burkina Faso, Africa, and enjoyed everyday in the hot weather. Chilled hibiscus tea is light and refreshing. The natural floral tang is a wonderful counterpart to sweet pineapple chunks. I'm traveling the world, making vegetarian or vegan recipes from each country. Some can be especially challenging, lol.

    Recipe #501674

    This combination of dusky dates and tinted marzipan is a North African tradition. Worthy of a special occasion. From Cooking Light(May 2001).

    Recipe #501197

    Honey(raw organic is best) is one of nature’s miracles. It is a delicious ingredient in many foods, has antibacterial properties, works as a humectant (keeps things moist), soothes a cough or sore throat, and makes your tea about 1,000 better-and that’s just scratching the surface really. Whether you’re using it as a sweetener, or trying to kick a cough, it’s just plain useful. Here are 5 flavors (and a general method) to infuse your honey and make it that much more wonderful. From everydayroots.

    Recipe #500263

    This is an excellent supper dish from Angola, Africa, which children will enjoy. Serve the fritters with a hot green vegetable or salad and brown bread and butter. From wiki recipes.

    Recipe #499688

    I had some kale salad from my local Ingles grocery store the other day and wanted to make something similar at home. This is what I came up with. I hope you enjoy it. The key is to chop up the kale real small. Feel free to put what you want in the salad. The dressing is used in Lebanon to use over fish, felafels, rice, etc.

    Recipe #498581

    Found on Pinterest. Yum.

    Recipe #494163

    Full of bright flavor, Chuck Hughes’ salad is a lovely mix of parsley, mint and oregano and is bulked up with tomatoes, cucumber, and chickpeas. Toasted and crumbled pita bread is an inventive way to replace traditional croutons! This is really inexpensive if you use herbs from your garden. From the Cooking Channel.

    Recipe #493441

    The Omani people are well known for their hospitality and offers of refreshment. To be invited into someone's home will mean coffee (kahwa), a strong, bitter drink flavoured with cardamom, and dates or halwa. Posted for the North African Middle East (NAME) forum. Serving Omani coffee has certain traditions to be observed. Such rituals include that the cup should not be filled to the rim. It is rather served with only one fourth of the cup is filled, Also when the person have taken enough coffee he or she should shake his cup as a sign so that the one who is serving stop pouring more coffee for him.

    Recipe #492861

    Roasted and then spiced with a sweet and savory seasoning makes these yummy. :) From Country Living magazine.

    Recipe #480188

    I just love watermelon and the drinks that are made from them. This is so yummy. I have added my own little addition 8) . Adapted from Healthy Quick Cook by Martha Stewart.

    Recipe #460346

    I bought a large bag of kale and this recipe was on the back. I tried it and really enjoyed the sauce. I opted to leave out the almonds and cranberries, but it would be nice to dress it up. Enjoy! This will work with collards and other greens too. Kale is very high in beta carotene, vitamin K, vitamin C, lutein, zeaxanthin, and reasonably rich in calcium. Developed in Europe, it is used in England, Italy, Ireland, Germany, the Netherlands, Scotland, East Africa, Denmark, Sweden, Montenegro, Russia and even Japan. During World War II, the cultivation of kale in the U.K. was encouraged by the Dig for Victory campaign. The vegetable was easy to grow and provided important nutrients to supplement those missing from a normal diet because of rationing. Kale was introduced into Canada (and then into the U.S.) by Russian traders in the 19th century.

    Recipe #456151

    This refreshing drink can be made entirely from plants grown in Chad(and they are readily available in the rest of the world too). With the heat as strong as it is here, karkanji satisfies thirst at little cost. This is also used as a product of many a home-based business, and sold at the edge of a school, business or sporting event by the glassful. Some say it is good for colds, runny noses and flu symptoms.

    Recipe #455446

    A round golden grain that resembles couscous, millet reamains the primary grain in much of Asia and parts of Africa. Americans know it mostly as birdseed, but it deserves a place at our tables for it's light, pleasant taste. Millet is rich in B vitamins, surpassing even brown rice and whole wheat. Millet can be a bit quirky to cook. Unless you steam it for an hour. as you would couscous, millet doesn't cook into even, separate grains. Some grains will be soft, like mashed potatoes, while others are still crunchy. This is part of its appeal. Information and recipe from Deborah Madison's Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone cookbook.

    Recipe #430873

    Oooh, I just love mango and this combo is luscious!

    Recipe #427233

    This is a complex and exotic butter and goes great with sweet potatoes, or stirred into a soup(chickpea is good)! Adapted from Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone cookbook by Deborah Madison.

    Recipe #426805

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