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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / Zaar-Tastes from Africa!
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    204 recipes in

    Zaar-Tastes from Africa!

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    Bake the potatoes until they are just tender and still a tad firm so they don't turn to mush and fall apart. These potato skins are a great side dish to meat, tofu or salmon. Try this the next time you bake sweet potatoes! From Whole Foods.

    Recipe #511199

    Karen figured out how to make crispy sweet potato fries and the best part is you can do them in the deep fryer or the oven! Either way, you’ll end up with crispy fries. Guaranteed. From Karen, on The Art of Doing Stuff.

    Recipe #508955

    Swaziland, officially the Kingdom of Swaziland, sometimes called Ngwane or Swatini, is a landlocked country in southern Africa, bordered to the north, south and west by South Africa, and to the east by Mozambique. Swaziland’s swooping slopes are dotted with crops; where the Swazi grow fresh produce. Swazi Salads almost always include avocado, lettuce, onion, and beets. Here is a nice version from Global Table Adventure.

    Recipe #507993

    Fresh pineapple and coconut are some of the main ingredients in Caribbean(and assuredly in authentic Antigua and Barbuda cuisine). Here they get pureed to a smooth and creamy deliciousness! Adapted from a recipe by Vegetarian Times magazine.

    Recipe #507250

    Easy to make and you just add a teaspoon(or more to taste) to hot water for an instant great chai tea. You could actually takeit with you when you go to a restaurant, ask for hot water(or milk) and add your own syrup! From Health Food Lover.

    Recipe #506374

    Standard Libyan cuisine consists of soups, seafood, pasta, and fruit. A particular favorite is what we would associate as ketchup or hot sauce is called, harissa. It looks a little like ketchup, but smells really spicy. Once you get a little dab on some bread you can’t stop going back for more. It’s addictive. In North Africa, they put it on everything – fried eggs for breakfast, salad, and fish. The most common means is to put it on fresh flatbread. From Climbing Grier Mountain.

    Recipe #506121

    This is a variation on Indian garam masala, enjoyed in the Seychelles traditional coconut fish curry. The heat is fairly mild, but can be quite hot if you add more chili powder. Great in curries or on fish. The Seychelles are a group of 115 islands, only a few inhabited, in the Indian Ocean that lie off the coast of East Africa, northeast of Madagascar. Recipe adapted from Global Table Adventure.

    Recipe #506021

    Energy-boosting, cardamom-spiced date bites made with almonds, walnuts and pistachios. Eat two of these as a snack or with some juice for breakfast, and you're satisfied, says Elizabeth Falkner, who contributed this recipe to Food & Wine magazine.

    Recipe #505753

    A sweet and not-too-spicy hot chocolate with a hint of ginger. Perfect for cold winter nights or as a light dessert. This hot chocolate has a lovely warmth. It’s sweet, creamy and chocolatey and not-too-spicy due to a conservative amount of ginger. But, if you love the stuff then by all means, pop a few ginger candies in your mouth while you’re making a batch and throw in a whole teaspoon of ginger instead of half. That's the way I like it! Adapted from the Minimalist Baker.

    Recipe #504529

    Lentils are consistently rated one of the world’s healthiest foods. Filled with B Vitamins, folate, calcium and phosphorus, they are also a great source of protein and iron, making them a staple of vegetarian diets all over the world. A great way to use red lentils, this is delicious. A recipe from Tunisia. From generationyfoodie.

    Recipe #504170

    Sweet crunchy corn gets a little kick with this zesty corn topper.

    Recipe #503299

    From vegetarian recipe site. Harissa is a Tunisian hot chili sauce whose main ingredients are piri piri (type of chili pepper), serrano peppers and other hot chili peppers and spices and herbs such as garlic paste, coriander seed, red chili powder, caraway as well as some vegetable or olive oil. In Tunisia, harissa is used as an ingredient in a meat (goat or lamb) or fish stew with vegetables, and as a flavoring for couscous. It is also used for lablabi, a chickpea soup usually eaten for breakfast.

    Recipe #503269

    Lablabi is a popular breakfast stew made with chickpeas, broth, tomatoes, and various toppings such as capers, cumin, harissa, coddled eggs. Lablabi is a favorite winter morning breakfast for stevedores in Tunis. Throughout the city it is a morning offering in the small hole-in-the-wall cook shops. The actual soup is very simple and it’s depth of flavor derives from the garnishes you decide to use. As a tourist you will come home wanting lablabi in the morning; that’s how seductive it is. From Clifford A. Wright.

    Recipe #503268

    This vibrant spice blend makes an excellent addition to lamb burgers, rice, vegetarian dishes, or roasted chicken. Store in an airtight container in a cool, dark, dry place. From epicurious.com

    Recipe #503236

    Flavoursome and affordable mushrooms have all the attributes of a superfood - nutrient-rich, high in antioxidants.

    Recipe #502991

    Preserved lemons, sold loose in the souks, are one of the indispensable ingredients of Moroccan cooking, used in fragrant lamb and vegetable tagines, recipes for chicken with lemons and olives , and salads. Their unique pickled taste and special silken texture cannot be duplicated with fresh lemon or lime juice, despite what some food writers have said. In Morocco they are made with a mixture of fragrant-skinned doqq and tart boussera lemons, but I have had excellent luck with American lemons from Florida and California. Moroccan Jews have a slightly different procedure for pickling, which involves the use of olive oil, but this recipe, which includes optional herbs (in the manner of Safi), will produce a true Moroccan preserved-lemon taste. The important thing in preserving lemons is to be certain they are completely covered with salted lemon juice. With my recipe you can use the lemon juice over and over again. (As a matter of fact, I keep a jar of used pickling juice in the kitchen, and when I make Bloody Marys or salad dressings and have half a lemon left over, I toss it into the jar and let it marinate with the rest.) Use wooden utensils to remove the lemons as needed. Sometimes you will see a sort of lacy, white substance clinging to preserved lemons in their jar; it is perfectly harmless, but should be rinsed off for aesthetic reasons just before the lemons are used. Preserved lemons are rinsed, in any case, to rid them of their salty taste. Cook with both pulps and rinds, if desired. The recipe and introductory text below are excerpted from Paula Wolfert's book Couscous and Other Good Food From Morocco.

    Recipe #502986

    Under the pulsing sun, tea ladies line the streets of Sudan. They soak up what little shade they can find. Water simmers over charcoal stoves. They swirl ingredients through the steam, into the pot. Many patrons like to hold a sugar cube between the teeth while drinking to sweeten the brew. The most popular of the teas is cinnamon, with mint and ginger following close behind. Here's my version. Adapted from Global Table Adventure.

    Recipe #502745

    Every mug gently cradles steeped black tea and fresh grated ginger, topped off with creamy milk and sweet spoonfuls of sugar. Spicy and comforting. Served cold, this tea makes for an refreshing poolside sipper. Served hot, this tea will warm your spirit as well as your fingers. This recipe is inspired by the Swahili people of Africa, some of who live in the northern tip of Mozambique. You’ll find similar drinks all in many parts of Africa, where ginger grows easily. Typically, the drink is served hot. Recipe by Sasha Martin.

    Recipe #502676

    Bissap is enjoyed in Mali and west Africa in general. Whether hot or cold, the flavor is bright, fruity, with a punch of ginger smoothed out by a velvety splash of vanilla. Be sure to serve the bissap with a few pieces of cubed mango. This recipe is by Sasha Martin.

    Recipe #502472

    They keep cool in Niger by drinking this hot tea, which makes them sweat, which cools them off. Pleasing on cool days too. From Sasha Martin.

    Recipe #502449

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