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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / Zaar - Calling all Canadian Recipes
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    128 recipes in

    Zaar - Calling all Canadian Recipes

    These are recipes with Canadian origins!
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    Displaying up to 20 pages of results. To see all results, or register.

    Use real maple syrup for a salad that you will love! Adapted from The Essential Eating Well Cookbook.

    Recipe #196876

    This is very easy to make and is great served with maple syrup! Adapted from Carolina Country magazine.

    Recipe #192674

    Pears and walnuts pair up so well together! Anjou or Bartlett pears work well for this recipe. Adapted from Cooking Light magazine(Jan/2006). Enjoy!

    Recipe #190684

    A tried and true favorite from the California Fig folks!

    Recipe #188539

    A great drink for a good start for your morning! Full of vitamins and so good for you! This is good for your skin and helps prevent cancer. Adapted from Total Juicing by Elaine LaLanne!

    Recipe #188222

    Adapted from Total Juicing! A great pick me up! Good for eyes and skin, ulcers and blood pressure, regularity, general cleansing, and cancer prevention.

    Recipe #188120

    This is one of the top anti cancer juices! It's also good for your skin and hair. Easy too! From Total Juicing by Elaiine LaLanne.

    Recipe #188116

    Taken from the Food Channel's Best of Show, The Critic's Choice. Great flavors!

    Recipe #183957

    Lighter and healthier than regular salad dressing, this is sprayed or splashed onto a salad. About one tablespoon is all you need! Adapted from Great Good Food by Julee Rosso.

    Recipe #183544

    Crushed cereal, almonds and maple syrup are pressed into individual tart pans and baked. then filled with yogurt and fresh fruit to make an elegant breakfast or brunch, even dessert! Adapted from Country Living magazine.

    Recipe #180394

    This is made using dried fruit and is so good!

    Recipe #179430

    Cereal with all the good things in it! A great way to start the day! Adapted from Country Living magazine(Feb.2006)

    Recipe #177571

    This wonderful dish was prepared by chef Willie White of New Brunswick, Canada's incredible Algonquin Hotel.

    Recipe #176084

    This recipe comes from the Pronto Restaurant at the Coast Canadian Inn in British Columbia, Canada. Easy and wonderful! Raspberries are also grown in the Northeast, Mid Atlantic, Mid West, and West!

    Recipe #175430

    This is a delicious and healthy smoohtie made with peaches, blackberries, and almonds! The peaches and blackberries provide heart-healthy soluble fiber.

    Recipe #174599

    With raspberries and almonds, this is packed with fiber! From the California Almond Board.

    Recipe #174602

    I have just discovered the wonderful world of fondue!

    Recipe #53839

    This lavender syrup is so pretty and it is great with club soda or ice water. Now you can use all those pretty violets growing in the back yard! Make sure to use clean, unblemished flowers! Cook time is an estimate. The kids will love to help with this!

    Recipe #117219

    Make your own Maraschino cherries! Adapted from Meal Master. I have not tried this yet, so putting it here for safekeeping! The sweet sundae-topper has its origins in Yugoslavia and northern Italy. For centuries, merchants had used marascas - small, bitter, black wild cherries - to make a sweet liqueur. Part of the flavor came from crushed cherry stones, which have an almond-like flavor. Marascara cherries preserved in the cherry liqueur were imported into the United States in the 1890s. These maraschino cherries were an expensive luxury served at the finest hotels. With typical ingenuity, American cherry processors figured out a way to make a less expensive version. They used Royal Anne cherries, less liqueur, and almond oil instead of crushed cherry pits. In the 1920s, alcohol was eliminated altogether when horticulturalist Ernest Wiegand found a way to preserve cherries using brine instead of alcohol. The American version of the maraschino became so popular that it completely replaced the foreign import. Cherries are grown in several regions of this country, but seventy percent of the cherries produced in the United States come from four states (Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Utah). Maraschini cherries are also produced in New England and the Mid Atlantic.

    Recipe #132360

    An old fashioned recipe. The corn cobs give this syrup its distinctive flavor!

    Recipe #132679

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