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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / Zaar-Asian Cuisine!
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    372 recipes in

    Zaar-Asian Cuisine!

    I love Asian flavor! I have compiled all my Asian inspired recipes here. I hope you enjoy!
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    The Sweet and sour sauce has almond butter and other ingredients to simulate hoisin sauce and works amazingly well with the cooked lentils. Loaded up to some crisp lettuce leaves with these lentils, topped it with some mango. and yum! Add cilantro or peanuts, mung sprouts, carrot ribbons or all! All plant based, whole food protein, gluten and grain free meal. If you have cooked lentils, this is ready in 10 minutes! From Vegan Richa.

    Recipe #514182

    Just watched Trisha's Southern Kitchen, the episode where Garth Brooks(her husband), cooks with her. They are so cute together! Ty stands for Trisha Yearwood. This is one of their favorite recipes. This recipe makes 12 servings, so feel free to half or quarter it. You can lighten the dressing up by using less oil and sugar to your taste. Enjoy! Recipe adapted from Home Cooking with Trisha Yearwood.

    Recipe #514175

    Spicy, sweet, cauliflower wings, a cross between buffalo wings and cocktail meatballs. With mango preserves, orange juice and loads of Sriracha! You can use any other jam or preserves and make a glaze. The cauliflower is covered in thick batter and baked, then tossed in glaze and served. Use gluten-free flour for a gf batter(a combination of Oat flour, rice flour, sorghum flour). Easily made oil-free as well. From veganricha.com.

    Recipe #513941

    From Good Eats, episode: Ginger: Rise of the Rhizome. I might try adding a vanilla bean to the simmering water next time. Or how about adding a little lemon peel? The candied ginger is also good dipped in dark or bittersweet chocolate.

    Recipe #512659

    You will love the caramelized onions and the avocado mash as the condiment...so good! This is reminiscent of a B.L.T in some ways....or rather it might be called a T.L.T. This is a keeper! From The Simple Veganista, who says the recipe was inspired by I Love Vegan

    Recipe #512514

    A perfect hearty vegan sandwich that will become a classic.From The Simple Veganista.

    Recipe #512513

    A delicious soup from thriveforward.com.

    Recipe #511840

    At it’s most basic, this is just a really delicious soup that will warm you right up.The only necessary serving suggestions are the fresh herbs, everything else is up to you in terms of what you have time for, how many people you’re serving and how hungry everyone is. You don’t actually have to have a fondue pot or anything. You can just place the pot on a trivet in the middle of the table. It won’t have a chance to get cold! by Isa Chandra at Post Punk Kitchen.

    Recipe #511838

    The recipe below makes MASS QUANTITIES of seitan. It's very versatile and it freezes well .Steaming in foil really works! You can half or quarter this to make smaller quantities. I don't know how much this actually makes so posting directly as written. Originally posted on Vegan Dad, changed a little and posted on Vegan Foodie Mama blog.

    Recipe #511200

    Kokkoh is used as an infant formula broth made from whole grains, seeds and legumes lightly toasted and ground to a powder(in this recipe using brown rice only). It was first brought to Western culture by Sakura Nyoichi, better known as George Ohsawa, as part of the Macrobiotic Diet, based a recipe widely used in traditional Japan and most commonly eaten as a breakfast cereal. From cafemom. Kokkoh is recommended as both a substitute for mother's milk and a means of weaning infants from it. (In the former case the recipe often calls only for brown rice ground to a fine powder and water.) Besides its soft and easily digestible texture, kokkoh is recommended as such because its mixture has a high and varied protein content; combined, the amino acids in each of the ingredients described at the outset include virtually all those needed for consumption. It is thus especially well suited for the growth needs of a child. When used solely for weaning, it is recommended that kokkoh be introduced at between 8 months and a year of age. It may be used as breast milk substitute as early as five months, but with a larger proportion of water, in order to further dilute the mixture. Kokkoh is also an important part of the macrobiotic diet, in accordance with the diet's heavy emphasis upon grains. Along with its use as a means of weaning, kokkoh is a common breakfast food among macrobiotic eaters of all ages.

    Recipe #510815

    A great Bed and Breakfast recipe. Here's what the Innkeeper says, “This recipe is a very popular entrée or appetizer in our restaurant, the Ravens. The tofu is skewered and grilled, then served with a Thai-style peanut sauce.” —Innkeeper, Stanford Inn by the Sea--Stanford Inn by the Sea, in Mendocino, CA. Enjoy!

    Recipe #509867

    Seasoning mixtures of this kind(Baharat Karisimi) are common in kitchens throughout Turkey. Use this spice mix for lamb, rice, in flatbreads, etc. From Saveur magazine.

    Recipe #508868

    Chat/Chatpati spice mix is a mix of hot and tangy spices that can be used to spice up snack, salads, fruit salads and even curries. In Bangladesh, chat mix is used heavily in the food served by street vendors – the ubiquitous fuchka and chatpati vans that one sees everywhere. From virtualbangladesh.com

    Recipe #508746

    The distinct aroma of Bengali cuisine comes from the blend of spices known as panch phoron. Panch means “five” and phoron is “flavor”. Panch phoron is a blend of flavorful seeds: the green fennel, yellow mustard, black nigella, golden fenugreek and brown cumin. The ingredients are generally added in equal proportions, though this can vary according to taste. Nigella seeds are about the size of sesame seeds. The seeds appear often in East Indian Cooking. Their flavor is enhanced by heating or baking. If you can't find nigella seeds, I have given a substitue that will give you a good likeness of the oniony, sour taste. If you are looking for the color, you can add some black sesame seeds. From virtualbangladesh.com.

    Recipe #508741

    These fries are definitely best eaten right out of the oven. As happens with many baked eggplant dishes, when the fries have a chance to cool fully, they can get a little limp and not nearly as delicious. Sprinkle flaky salt on them the moment they come out of the oven. You can also double the recipe for Lemon Tahini Sauce and spread it on sandwiches, fold a little into omelettes, or spoon it atop warm grain bowls. Store the sauce, covered, in the refrigerator and just thin it out with additional water if it settles or thickens. From the Kitchn.

    Recipe #508373

    Za’atar (ZAHT-ar) is a class of herbs, and includes members of the thyme, oregano, and savory families. Za’atar is also a Middle Eastern herb blend, containing one or more of the za’atar herbs. As with many centuries-old dishes, za’atar blend has many regional and familial variations. Here is a basic za'atar recipe from Alton Brown. Okay, I tweeked it, like I most always do, adding in the necessary(to me) dried oregano. Enjoy sprinkled on top of flatbread, over grilled vegetables, or used in dips like hummus, baba ghanoush, or tzatziki. You can also add a few generous teaspoons to make a Middle Eastern version of pasta salad.

    Recipe #508372

    The recipe was inspired by the daikon kimchee pickles that are served at the start of a Korean meal. These are great served on the side or sliced up in sandwiches or salads. They can be eaten as soon as they're chilled, but the flavors improve after a few days. From Vegetarian Times magazine(July 2008)

    Recipe #508351

    Smoky spicy flavored chipotles, mixed with some peanut butter and roasted red peppers, makes this hummus come out super creamy and is jam packed with flavor. The cilantro cools it down a bit and adds some pretty flecks of green, totally perfect for serving at your next gathering with loads of veggies and crackers. Adapted from the Vegan Cookbook Aficionado.

    Recipe #507770

    You MUST give these fries a try. They are a low calorie fix for when you are really craving some salty fried goodness. Simple to make, they require a little TLC for crispiness but it is soo worth the effort. Serve with anything, but especially turkey burgers and sandwiches. You can dip them in anything you like and each serving of fries has ONLY 75 calories! Yum yum! Tips for crispy fries: 1. Soak the cut fries in salted water for at least an hour. I have no scientific reason as to why this works, but it does. The soaked batches crisped much better than the unsoaked batches. 2. Space fries at least 1″ apart on all sides. Overcrowding leads to sogginess 3. Flip fries halfway through the cooking time. Unfortunately, this has to be done by hand. Be careful cause they’re hot. 4. Cook fries on a cooling rack. That way air circulates around them as they cook. 5. If you don’t have a cooling rack or (like me) only own a small one, cook the fries on parchment paper. Again, I have no explanation for this except it works. The batch I baked on tin foil did not come out well. 6. Pat fries completely dry before tossing with olive oil. Get rid of all excess water or else they will steam rather than bake in the oven. From Dara at generationyfoodie.

    Recipe #507334

    From Robin Robertson's Nut Butter Universe. Robin says,"This soup has it all: great taste, vibrant color, and the creamy goodness of almond butter. For this recipe, I use Frontier brand organic curry powder, a heady blend of coriander, turmeric, cumin, mustard, fenugreek, cardamom, nutmeg, red pepper, cinnamon, and cloves, but most any curry spice blend should perform well. For a thinner soup, stir in a small amount of nondairy milk during the final heating." Posted in Cadry's Kitchen.

    Recipe #507078

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