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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / Vegan Techniques & How To's Galore!!
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    78 recipes in

    Vegan Techniques & How To's Galore!!

    How to freeze, roast, toast, store, prepare, dry, sprout, and substitute!! There may be a few recipes that have milk or butter listed just use the vegan alternatives. These recipes are more for the techniques not necessarily the ingredients.
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    This came from a cookbook purchased in New Mexico years ago. Thought someone might find this helpful.

    Recipe #417200

    The basic method of cooking artichokes.

    Recipe #67577

    This is an easy way to get your cabbage leaves ready to stuff. You probably need more than two gallons of water, I sure do in my giant pot. I also do this outside to keep the house from smelling like cabbage for days.

    Recipe #305376

    There are so many ways to serve this wonderful veggie. I use it in place of pasta. You can experiment with different sauces and herbs to create a great tasting dish. Try it with Alfredo sauce, or add some pesto and butter or your favorite herbs. Look for more recipes I posted for this veggie.

    Recipe #77554

    I was surprised not to see this one on Zaar! Tyler Florence said, "Once you try this, you'll never have corn on the cob any other way." We agree wholeheartedly! The corn steams and cooks in it's own husk without any pre-soaking or anything. The corn's flavor is intensified right in the husk! After removal from the oven, just pull back the husk and use it for a handle. The silk comes off with the husk! Let me know if you like corn this way as much as we do!

    Recipe #177558

    11 Reviews |  By Debbwl

    One of my neighbors was telling me this is her favorite way to make corn. She bakes the corn in the husk and then peels it back and uses the husk as a handle. *posted corn as two ingredients because that is the only way Food would take it.

    Recipe #434212

    Whenever I need cooked beets, I don't boil them, I bake them. They're less messy, easier to handle and far tastier. The moisture is inside the beets, not in the boiling water. I've included 2 ways to use them.

    Recipe #72861

    42 Reviews |  By Tish

    This is the BEST way to eat a sweet potato. We have baked sweet potatoes with our steaks instead of Idaho potatoes. It's a nice complement to chicken and beef - or any other meat that I can think of! This can also be made on the grill or tossed in the coals if you are camping!

    Recipe #55678

    Another keeper from Alton Brown's show Good Eats! I don't make baked potatoes any other way now.

    Recipe #71933

    I used to go to a tavern for breakfast on the weekends from time to time. The cook there made the best hasbrown potatoes. She finally told me what the secret is to having good hashbrowns. You need to partially cook the potatoes first. Raw potatoes have a tendency to absorb the grease and stick together. Any kind of potato can be used but I prefer the Yukon Golds or red potatoes. You can use these in my Recipe #78432 recipe.

    Recipe #77231

    Back in the Dark Ages when I was a little girl there was no microwave popcorn. There weren't even microwaves (gasp)! Mom actually used to make popcorn on the stove. Here's how, courtesy of the Fannie Farmer Cookbook.

    Recipe #119045

    39 Reviews |  By Roosie

    This is a vegan substitute for eggs in baked goods. It could probably work in casseroles too, but don't try scrambled eggs with this! ;)

    Recipe #104832

    I often use flax seed and water as an egg replacer, but if you want to avoid a nutty taste, this can be used in baking, too. It is closer to the commercial egg replacers. From Vegetarian Times, January 2007.

    Recipe #203168

    This is easy to make--just make sure you use 1 tablespoon of cornstarch per 1 cup of sugar.

    Recipe #88812

    I got this recipe off of a bag of flour when I did not have any self-rising flour.

    Recipe #5247

    Make a six month supply of bread crumbs for the cost of 2 loaves of bread and a cup of butter. And they taste better than the store-bought version. I've used this recipe for 15 years and have no idea where it came from. The yield of course, will depend on the size of the loaves you use.

    Recipe #70154

    23 Reviews |  By Nose

    I never could cook short-grain East Asian-style rice until I learned this method from Japanese cookbooks. I knew what I was after: the rice should stick together enough that mouthfuls can easily be picked up with chopsticks, but not be at all sticky or gummy. Each grain should be white and smooth, almost pearl-like, and should taste subtly not just of starch but of delicious grain. For a long time, my short-grain rice was not only not perfect, it often turned out gummy or scorched. I had been able to cook any kind of long-grain rice quite well for years; with that I seem to pick up on some cues I can't quite put into words, maybe just the timing, or some change in the smell. This knack didn't translate to short-grain rice, and I continued to struggle until I read some Japanese cookbooks. As soon as I tried this method, I was able to produce nearly perfect short-grain white rice right away. The cues for how to cook the short-grain rice are in the sounds it makes while cooking. A Japanese nursery rhyme explains: Hajime choro choro (At first it bubbles) Naka pa ppa (And then it hisses) Akago naite mo (Even if the baby is crying (from hunger)) Futa toru na (Don't remove the lid)

    Recipe #108409

    This "recipe" comes from a 40 year old cook book I inherited when I met Russell! "Entertaining with Kerr". He was a pompus TV cook in Australia, and this is the only thing I've ever cooked out of the book. It's also the ONLY way I enjoy my rice (and we eat a lot of that!)

    Recipe #53546

    This recipe makes perfect rice every time, simply because the temptation to stir isn't there. This foolproof rice goes well with roasted chicken or broiled fish. I sometimes like to add a 1/2 cup of shredded carrots in addition to the onion to give it a flash of color.

    Recipe #109716

    There is no soaking, no mess, no added fat, and even my mom can't ruin this one!

    Recipe #88564

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