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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / Vegan Techniques & How To's Galore!!
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    78 recipes in

    Vegan Techniques & How To's Galore!!

    How to freeze, roast, toast, store, prepare, dry, sprout, and substitute!! There may be a few recipes that have milk or butter listed just use the vegan alternatives. These recipes are more for the techniques not necessarily the ingredients.
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    The basic method of cooking artichokes.

    Recipe #67577

    Whenever I need cooked beets, I don't boil them, I bake them. They're less messy, easier to handle and far tastier. The moisture is inside the beets, not in the boiling water. I've included 2 ways to use them.

    Recipe #72861

    11 Reviews |  By Debbwl

    One of my neighbors was telling me this is her favorite way to make corn. She bakes the corn in the husk and then peels it back and uses the husk as a handle. *posted corn as two ingredients because that is the only way Food would take it.

    Recipe #434212

    42 Reviews |  By Tish

    This is the BEST way to eat a sweet potato. We have baked sweet potatoes with our steaks instead of Idaho potatoes. It's a nice complement to chicken and beef - or any other meat that I can think of! This can also be made on the grill or tossed in the coals if you are camping!

    Recipe #55678

    11 Reviews |  By Katzen

    From Fresh from the Vegetarian Slow Cooker, this recipe is a guideline to slow cook basic dried beans such as pintos, kidneys, white beans, and black eyed peas. If you wish to flavour the beans, add the onion, garlic, and bay leaves, else leave them as is; just cook them in water and you will have beans that are ready to use in any recipe calling for cooked beans. Cook time does not include the overnight soak.

    Recipe #418837

    Another keeper from Alton Brown's show Good Eats! I don't make baked potatoes any other way now.

    Recipe #71933

    I was surprised that I couldn't find this recipe loaded into 'zaar. The amount of garlic appears substantial but try it and you'll find that your home-made beans are good as the canned. This recipe isn't complicated but it takes some pre-planning. The preparation and cooking times do not include the pre-soaking (4 hours or overnight) or the post-cooking resting period (15 minutes). Beans in liquid can be cooled, covered, and refrigerated up to 5 days.

    Recipe #354834

    My DH spent time over the summer and this past weekend helping out the good folks at Ironwood Farm here in Albuquerque. They were harvesting and gave my DH a ton of produce to take home. Since I had a full bag of paste tomatoes and knew we'd never eat them all I decided to dry them. It took a while to do this but it was worth it as we now have a huge jar of dried tomatoes which will probably last a very long time. You can salt the tomatoes if you want and add the herbs but I left them plain.

    Recipe #325795

    10 Reviews |  By Prose

    Is your tofu mushy, watery, or crumbly? Are you having trouble getting it to brown? Try this. It's the perfect method for cooking tofu because it takes advantage of its moisture content. The results are so firm and flavorful that you will be able to convert the meat-eating non-believers! As a bonus, this is a VERY low-fat recipe! Source: http://hubpages.com/hub/How_to_Cook_Tofu_Like_the_Pros

    Recipe #415903

    From the cookbook called "How It All Vegan".

    Recipe #26676

    39 Reviews |  By Roosie

    This is a vegan substitute for eggs in baked goods. It could probably work in casseroles too, but don't try scrambled eggs with this! ;)

    Recipe #104832

    I got this recipe from my sister-in-law. I have always thought there was no way to freeze either carrots or green beans to have them taste good. Well I was wrong and I didn't believe until I tasted hers. Just like fresh from the garden or very very close to it. I have done both but mostly I just do beans this way.

    Recipe #318611

    1 Reviews |  By AmyZoe

    It's great to stock up on vegetables when they're on sale, but sometimes I don't use the quantity I buy on time which isn't thrifty at all. Today I learned how simple it is to freeze fresh broccoli and cauliflower. If I had a garden, this would be a great way to have fresh vegetables year round. I froze both broccoli and cauliflower, and it was so quick I have no excuse not to do it next time. Recipe courtesy of wikihow.com.

    Recipe #403492

    2 Reviews |  By AmyZoe

    My Mom taught me what to do when your celery gets rubbery. I used to just toss it, but if you put it in a jar or vase (I use a ceramic pitcher) full of water it looks brand new again. Sometimes I leave the celery standing up like that in the fridge (just cut off the bottom so it is easier to stand), or put it on the counter in water for 30 minutes or so before you use it for the same effect. Today I decided I wanted to freeze celery, but I didn't know if it was possible. I found it it was possible on thriftyfun.com Once frozen, you won't want to eat it raw but it will be ready for cooked dishes.

    Recipe #403485

    7 Reviews |  By SPrins

    I always have a big herb garden in the summer. Basil especially just grows like crazy and I hate wasting it! A few years ago I was looking for how to freeze them, and kept reading about chopping and freezing them in water in ice cube trays or spreading them on cookie sheets to freeze, etc, etc. It just sounded like too much work. Then I stumbled across someone who claimed to do the following. It works great and tastes just as yummy as fresh! :O)

    Recipe #422240

    Yes, you can freeze beans. No need for them to go to waste. Recipe courtesy of The Settlement Cookbook.

    Recipe #437057

    1 Reviews |  By AmyZoe

    Wondering what to do with all that squash? Freeze it for next time. Food remains at top quality for 3 to 6 months, and is still safe to eat after 6 months. Recipe courtesy of The Settlement Cookbook.

    Recipe #437061

    Based on a recipe from Jennifer Cornbleet's book, Raw Food Made Easy for 1 or 2 People. She says in its introduction, "Freeze your extra bananas so you will always have some on hand for quick shakes." Unfortunately for me, I froze my bananas before reading her recipe! I will update after I discover how truly difficult it is to peel a frozen banana! UPDATE: it's truly difficult! :( I will definitely go with this recipe the next time! :)

    Recipe #341808

    This is good, general information for brewing and serving tea.

    Recipe #235643

    Freezing is a simple and excellent way to preserve fresh culinary herbs. Packing in ice cube trays makes it easy to always have fresh herbs on hand, adding fresh herb flavor to soups, sauces, and drinks. Some people prefer to freeze in a good quality olive oil, I prefer the boiling water method, which is listed in this recipe here today. You can freeze herbs individually or in combinations of other herbs.

    Recipe #111461

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