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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / Twinkle, twinkle little star
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    143 recipes in

    Twinkle, twinkle little star

    When God cut holes in Heaven, The holes that stars peep through, Those little stars fell down to earth, Those little stars are you. (a rhyme from my childhood) Those little stars are also my star recipes ... available here for selection in New Zaar Stars Tag.
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    Displaying up to 20 pages of results. To see all results, or register.

    If you've never cooked with fennel, try it! Its flavour really is unique. This is a deliciously flavoursome soup blending herbs and spices with fennel and leeks. Fennel has long been a central ingredient in many Asian (it’s a main component in the Chinese five spice powder), Middle Eastern and European dishes. In the Middle Ages, its popularity spread northward from the Mediterranean area, where it still features in many pasta dishes. This soup is suitable both for day-to-day meals and for dinner parties. To keep it strictly vegetarian, make it with a vegetable stock. For the best results, use a really good stock, preferably home-made. This soup is best made in a large, deep (preferably non-stick) sauté pan with a lid. Next time I make it, I’m going to substitute a cup of wine for one of the cups of stock, adding it during the 15 minutes while the soup is simmering.

    Recipe #120393

    A rich lentil soup recipe which I've adapted from an online Jamie Oliver recipe, and posted here in response to a Forum request for a lentil soup recipe without tomatoes. The preparation and cooking times below do not include the one hour required for soaking the lentils.

    Recipe #133568

    These fritters could be served as appetizers, as a side dish or as one of several vegetarian dishes. It's the closest recipe I've found for some delicious zucchini fritters I ate and loved some years ago, though I'm pretty sure that they didn't have sumac in them, and sumac adds a lot of flavour. When I inquired after the recipe at the time, the Greek woman who'd made them she named the key ingredients but was very dismissive of them. I felt as if to her it was if I'd asked how to make something as simple as say a basic bread and butter sandwich with a slice of cheese in it! This recipe is from the Australian Women's Weekly's 'fresh food fast: delicious no fuss healthy recipes'. Australian brown onions are what Americans call yellow onions. Sumac, if you've not used it is defined (in the same recipe book) as "a purple-red astringent spice ground from berries that grow on shrubs that flourish wild around the Mediterranean; has a tart, lemony flavour. Found in Middle-Eastern food stores. Substitute: 1/8 teaspoon five-spice plus 1/2 teaspoon lemon pepper plus 1/8 teaspoon all spice equals 3/4 teaspoon sumac". I've found that I can purchase it readily from more upmarket supermarkets and European delicatessens.

    Recipe #348982

    A simple to make, microwave recipe for Peanut Butter Bars which contains peanuts as well as peanut butter! I found this on Huey's website. It's a recipe he would have featured at some stage on his TV cooking show and is undoubtedly a recipe which he makes for his young daughter Charlotte. It is from Isabel Webb's 'Microwave Sweets & Lollies'. The preparation and cooking times below do not include the time needed for the peanut butter bar mixture to cool. How many Peanut Butter Bars you get from the recipe will, of course, depend on the size of your bars!

    Recipe #169001

    This recipe - by Rodney Dunn - is from the March 2001 issue of the 'Australian Good Taste' magazine. I have made these patties - served as a first course - with the chillis for guests who like hot and spicy food (and they've loved them) and for myself minus the chillis! Some useful conversions: 350g = a tad more than 11oz.; 50g = approximately 13/4oz.

    Recipe #346429

    Spread this on crusty bread or savoury biscuits, use it as a topping for tartlets or as a delicious spread in sandwiches. Used as a sandwich spread, I simply add something like a slice of roasted red pepper and baby spinach leaves. Or slices of ham. I adapted this recipe from one I found online because I was not satisfied with the gourmet spreads I'd been buying. Well they classified themselves as gourmet but they were, in fact, rather ordinary and also quite expensive! I love the fact that this recipe also has mushrooms in it - and a few other goodies! The original recipe must have been a Birds Eye recipe as it specified using Birds Eye Frozen Sliced Onions. I've slightly increased the mushrooms and garlic as I generally do with recipes and I've added leeks as the combination of flavours from onions, leeks and garlic is just so delicious. And I've also added thyme. Vary the garlic - and any of the ingredients - to suit your taste preferences. I've suggested adding more balsamic vinegar if your onion mixture seems too dry. If like me, you are a bit inexact in the measurement of some of the ingredients - oh, I may as well use all of that! - ;) this would obviously be the easiest way to correct this. Have fun playing with this recipe - and I hope that you enjoy it. I keep meaning to add some chopped nuts, probably walnuts, and must try to remember to do so next time I make this.

    Recipe #340448

    Adapted from Betty Crocker's "Slow Cooker Cookbook". Add a green vegetable towards the end of the cooking time and this really is a complete meal! In the original recipe, a cup of thawed green beans is added in the last twenty minutes. Not being overly fond of beans, when I've made this recipe, I've added broccoli florets in the last hour of cooking or baby spinach leaves in the last 10 minutes. Regardless of whether the soup I've used has herbs in it, I usually sprinkle oregano or mixed Italian herbs on the chicken.

    Recipe #133388

    This is as easy a recipe as I’ve seen anywhere and SO delicious: just have a glance at the ingredients and the instructions. Do recipes come any easier than this? This is Todd Cameron’s recipe and it appeared in the October issue of the Australian magazine ‘Delicious’. Todd is the chef at the Gaia Retreat & Spa near Byron Bay. How do I explain Byron Bay to non-Australians? Well the name of the retreat should give you some idea. Byron Bay, situated on the New South Wales coastline, on the Pacific Ocean, has long been the retreat of hippies – or aging hippies – and in more recent years properties there have been much sought after by Australian actors, such as Russell Crowe and Paul Hogan. So although Byron Bay still has New Age leanings, it has also become the stomping ground of the rich and famous. That said, this recipe with its three ingredients and no chopping or grating, whisking or kneading, couldn’t be simpler. Or quicker!

    Recipe #139928

    A decadent delight I found in a March 2005 issue of 'Fresh' magazine. This was a reader's recipe from Sharon Johnston, Mount Crosby, Queensland (Australia). There is a photograph on the same page as the recipe, and Sharon looks about 10 years old. The page bore the heading 'A slice of heaven.' I considered adding nuts to the recipe, but decided to leave it exactly as it was. Nuts would be the obvious addition here, possibly instead of the coconut. Or perhaps 1/2 cup of coconut and 1/2 cup chopped macadamia nuts. Hope you enjoy Sharon's slices of heaven!

    Recipe #327699

    I have adapted this easy to make recipe from Alan Coxon’s Chicken Nuggets recipe from Great Food Live on the uktv FOOD website. I’ve added marjoram or oregano and almonds or walnuts to the crumb mixture to make the chicken nuggets tastier. You could also use half and half of either of these alternatives: a pinch of both marjoram and oregano and perhaps 2 almonds and 1 walnut! If you are going to be serving these to children, it’s probably best to use a mild, sweet paprika. It’s certainly a recipe that children ready to help in the kitchen could take part in preparing. Perhaps then they’ll see chicken nuggets as something you make yourself and eat at home rather than as a fast food choice. If making this only for adults and you like some bite in your food, add the appropriate quantity of your favourite spicy ingredient in the crumbs or in the accompanying salsa or relish. But if you're looking for a milder salsa, you might like to try my Apple Mint Yoghurt Salsa Recipe #320813. Remember that smaller nuggets will require more crumbs and will cook more quickly. For the benefit of any others like internetnut wanting to make this recipe and not having access to conversion charts, I have added the conversions below.

    Recipe #321077

    Onions and garlic are slowly pan-cooked until caramelised and then used as the base of a delicious frittata. Adapted from a recipe on the Simply Great Recipes website. Obviously you can use your own pesto recipe or a pesto from your favourite deli in place of the commercially available one. I left the Leggo's pesto named in the original recipe in this recipe, as that makes for a quicker version when time is limited. For the best results from this simple dish, use free range eggs.

    Recipe #320452

    Chickpeas and apricots: now those are healthy ingredients in a muffin! This recipe was emailed to me from the Simply Great Meals Recipe Club. I haven't yet made it but it caught my attention because I was impressed by the healthy ingredients, particularly the inclusion of chickpeas and from a search on Zaar I couldn't find any muffin recipes containing chickpeas.

    Recipe #124642

    A simple, quick to make, low-fat and delicious anytime mushroom lovers' snack that I have adapted from a recipe I found in the November 2005 issue of the Australian magazine 'Table: easy family food for every day of the week'. I am posting it for the 2005 Zaar World Tour.

    Recipe #140898

    For beetroot lovers! A delicious, very low calorie, VERY low fat (0.1g!) side dish to accompany any main course. I found this recipe in Karen Meyer's 'The Artful Vegetarian' and I have adapted it slightly in posting it for the Healthy for the Holidays Challenge.

    Recipe #147044

    A deliciously different recipe for spiced nuts which I came across this afternoon in the current issue of the Australian magazine 'Woman's Day', and with my usual impatience just had to make this evening, with a few modifications - minus the chilli powder to meet our taste preferences - but I'd certainly make these complete with the chilli powder for friends, and have left the chilli powder in as an ingredient. In making these, I increased the garlic from 1 to 2 cloves, and I minced it rather than crushing it. I used cashews, macadamias and hazelnuts. Why, oh why do I keep buying all these magazines each week? Spot on if you guessed to check out their latest recipes! And it was worth buying this week's just to have found this recipe! These would be demolished very quickly if served with other appetisers and drinks, and they'd be a great addition to salads and stir-fries - if they lasted that long! :) Don't add salt - or add it sparingly - if your nuts are already salted.

    Recipe #353594

    Yummy pancakes which can be served for breakfast, brunch, as a snack or as a side-dish. Although the recipe specifies sebago potatoes, you can also use russet burbank or spunta potatoes. All of these are potatoes that are varieties which are good for baking. This recipe has been adapted from a recipe in the Australian Women's Weekly's 'Potatoes: over 100 exciting ways to cook the humble spud', recently reprinted by popular demand. It is essential to squeeze as much moisture as possible from the potatoes in step one before adding the potatoes to the other ingredients. Please feel free to vary the herbs according to your taste preferences.

    Recipe #351753

    A quick to prepare rice dish, adapted from a recipe on one the cards in international culinary celebrity Kurma Dasa's 52 card set 'Quick Vegetarian recipes you can prepare in a hurry'. It is important to use pans with tight-fitting lids for this recipe. If you are not overly fond of peas or spinach, substitute them with a vegetable you prefer. But the green of the vegetables in this dish does contrast most attractively with the yellowish rice and the cashews.

    Recipe #328002

    Traditional Anglo-Saxon Australian tucker BEFORE the diverse influences of many migrant groups made our cuisine so rich and varied. This recipe has been adapted and posted for the 2005 Zaar World Tour from a recipe which I found in Huey's 'Tales and Recipes from a Travelling Cook'. Huey (Iain Hewitson) is an Australian chef who has written several books. He hosts a TV cooking show twice daily on weekdays, and runs Tolarno's restaurant in Melbourne. Huey recommends using a floury variety of potato for this recipe. He also advises that: "Blanching the sausages beforehand may be frowned on by the purists, but it is guaranteed to stop them bursting". The inclusion of garlic is one of my modifications. Bangers and mash of say fifty years ago would have been highly unlikely to have contained garlic. And the mashed potato could not have been heated in the microwave! If you want a more authentic experience of old-fashioned Aussie tucker, leave out the garlic and don't use the microwave!

    Recipe #137873

    Adapted from a recipe I found in this morning's Herald Sun's Sunday magazine, too late for today's breakfast but I plan to try it soon. It is from Donna Hay's 'Tastes of Autumn' magazine but to me this sounds like an anytime of year breakfast idea! My only additions were garlic, rosemary and sage, simply because I enjoy all of these in many savoury dishes, but I've listed them as optional. Feel free to add your favourite herbs. So that the omelet retains its lightness, I'd be disinclined to add anything else to it, but I'll certainly be making this with some mushrooms. YUM! OOPS! Chocolatl observed - quite rightly - that I'd omitted the butter from the Ingredients list. Add 1 tablespoon butter, preferably unsalted to the pan in step four.

    Recipe #363588

    Adapted from a recipe, from 'Australian Men's Health' magazine that I found online in October 2008. Add your choice of herbs. Lately I've been using grindings of a fabulous rosemary and sage blend in a grinder.

    Recipe #330186

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