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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / The Ultimate NA*ME cookbook!
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    472 recipes in

    The Ultimate NA*ME cookbook!

    A glorious compilation of recipes for use in the NA*ME Forum!
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    Displaying up to 20 pages of results. To see all results, or register.
    155 Reviews |  By Rita~

    A great side dish or a meal on its own. This is a Polish/Hungarian dish. Can use bacon but I cut back on that to make it meatless. Also can garnish with poppy seeds. Adding peas for color and nutrition. Bacon is a yummy addition for those that eat meat. Just brown drain most of the fat then add butter and oil and brown onions. Be sure to give the onions a nice brown color using a med high heat.

    Recipe #48588

    This recipe first appeared as part of a "meatless week-night meal" in the November, 2003 Bon Appetit. Originally posted by Mean Chef. Vegans can omit the yogurt.

    Recipe #78824

    Simple cous cous perfect for side dish.

    Recipe #221217

    Fritters are very popular in the Middle East. They are eaten hot or at room temperature as a vegetable side dish or a meze. It couldn’t be simpler to make, but you can dress it up with optional garnishes of black olives, tomatoes, or hard-boiled egg. The perfect use for small, sweet new zucchini. Serve alone or with a creamy garlic-lemon yogurt sauce for a perfect complement to any spicy or grilled foods that call for a cooling accompaniment.

    Recipe #127269

    The humble chickpea is low in fat, rich in fibre, complex carbohydrate, and protein, and is a good source of calcium, iron and B vitamins. I'm not a huge fan of canned soups, but they do have their uses sometimes! This sauce could be used with anything, but goes well with chickpeas and new potatoes. Paneer cheese is also delicious. From The Very Easy Vegetarian Cookbook, Alison & Simon Holst.

    Recipe #352996

    Dress up that ordinary grilled chicken to create an exotic Mediterranean meal that will excite your family and friends. These 4 marinades will transform your menu into an international culinary delight. Whether you use whole butterflied poussins, game hens, broiler halves, chicken parts or boneless chicken cubes on skewers, you will find the following marinades intensely flavorful. Marinate the meat overnight in the refrigerator and bring to room temperature before cooking. If you like, thread blanched vegetables such as sweet pepper and onion chunks, onto skewers and cook alongside the chicken (or thread them on the same skewers). Serve the chicken with fresh lemon wedges and a traditional side dish or salad with bread or pitas and watch it disappear. Cooking times vary.I have been told the Egyptian marinade is especially good on whole butterflied squab (pigeon). I adjusted the amount of lemon juice in the Lebanese marinade if you love lemon, go for the 1/2 a cup.... if lemon is just "okay" stick with the 1/4 cup.

    Recipe #127262

    This chicken stew has an exotic, complex flavor. Serve this sweet and spicy dish over couscous or rice, or with toasted whole wheat pita bread, to soak up all the juices!

    Recipe #49815

    44 Reviews |  By Mirj

    These are very addicting.

    Recipe #14303

    I am fortunate to work at a place where the manager of the cafeteria is a Moroccan native. Our mutual love of food has resulted in endless exchange of recipes, spices and samplings. (Indeed, some of the items now served in the cafeteria are recipes from this site.) One one occasion, I was lucky enough to be able to share in the lunch he prepared for the staff. I love eggs and his were just amazing. This recipe from World Vegetarian seems like a close approximate - though I know his version included a generous bit of cumin and cilantro. I'm posting the original here and will begin to tinker. Once perfected, I'll post that version as a second recipe. Will experiment to see if this works as well with canned tomatoes.

    Recipe #140936

    42 Reviews |  By Rita~

    In Morocco, tea is served very sweet. Decrease the amount of sugar to your liking. Tea is served in glasses.

    Recipe #83186

    Hasa Al Hummus is a wonderful Moroccan vegetarian soup for a comforting winter warmer. Morocco adores her soups though there are not a million varieties. Many recipes online may taste good though are faux or Moroccan "style" soups. I can guarantee that from me what you get is completely authentic Moroccan fare. I owe this to those interested in Moroccan food/cooking that is authentic. This is a very simple basic soup as most Moroccan foods are. Go to a touristy, especially a fancy one, spot and you will get French food with Moroccan influences; not how we eat every day. We eat Moroccan food perhaps with a French influence or two though never vice versa. My housemaid Nasiha who is approximately 60 taught me this recipe. I say approximately as many in Morocco do not know their birthday. Whip this up like we do and enjoy! In a pinch you can use canned chickpeas. They are acceptable, merely omit the first cooking hour. As an aside, here, hummus is the word for chickpea, not the dip/spread.

    Recipe #140868

    A Lebanese friend showed me how to make this back in 1996. It's my mother-in-laws favourite salad and I normally make it on request specially for her. I prefer flat leaf fresh parsley (also known as Italian Parsley) as it's better texture but curly leaf is alright. I normally buy the parsley and spring onions from the supper market prepacked bunches so if your measurements are slightly more or less it's alright, it doesn't have to be exact. The bourghul also soaks a lot of the moisture and I like Tabbouli to be moist not dried that's why there is a lot of lemons and olive oil. Like everything we cook it's all about the palate and who we are cooking for so if you choose to put less oil and lemons then it's ok. Salt and black pepper to taste, so feel free to add less but not to much. The secret to good Tabbouli is that everything should be finely chopped. Enjoy

    Recipe #197922

    I found this at a vegetarian Middle eastern recipe site & it was different enough to submit for my own NA*ME cookbook.

    Recipe #185492

    26 Reviews |  By Nasseh

    My husband's mom would make this for me while I was in Morocco. After the first time I tried to figure out what she put in it to make them so good. Mine were ok but not wonderful like hers. So the next time I was there I paid close attention when she made them.

    Recipe #266209

    One glance at the ingredients for this recipe and I knew it was, for me, a must-try recipe. I also loved the inclusion of time for marinating the chicken. Marinating always makes SUCH a difference to the end result. I'll be making this without the red chilli, but I'm well aware that many others will probably want to increase the heat. C'est la vie! I'd also prefer to serve it with a rice dish rather than couscous. I found this recipe in the latest edition - May 2005 - of the 'Australian Good Taste' magazine.

    Recipe #120175

    As part of the Zaar World Tour I’ve been in search of international recipes that look and appeal to me. This recipe is from Madhur Jaffrey’s International Vegetarian. Though this dish is Syrian variations are common through out the Mediterranean. For a quick dish, you can substitute the dried peas and soaking with 3 1/2 cups of canned of black-eyed peas. If you go that route, try rinsing the beans and using a cup of vegetable broth in lieu of the cooking liquid. Don’t let the cooking time scare you off, it’s soaking and simmer time that leaves you free to tend to other things. Consider greens and rice as an accompaniment to this dish.

    Recipe #140614

    This is a new favorite of mine. I was blown away by the wonderful flavors. I'm not a vegetarian but didn't miss meat with this. The onions turn out still crunchy, which I liked but if you don't you might try sautéing them in a little oil first.

    Recipe #205642

    Great side dish for lamb or other meats.

    Recipe #172367

    If you enjoy lemon flavours then you may like this dish. I tried it with chicken breast but I always come back to drumsticks as it adds a lot of flavour into the dish. I normally remove the skin from the drumstick as I watch our families fat intake but feel free to leave it on. It’s hard for me to regularly find coriander so unless I can I just leave it out. Baking time can varies depending the size/thickness of the drumsticks. I normally bake them between 1.5 hours to 1 hour 45 minutes. This recipe comes from a book called 'Meals Without Red Meat' by Simon and Allison Holst.

    Recipe #184191

    The spices make this version of the Lebanese salad special--and it's important to use good olive oil and lots of fresh lemon juice. Prep time does not include overnight soaking of the bulgur and herb mixture.

    Recipe #135053

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