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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / The Other Meat
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    11 recipes in

    The Other Meat


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    NOTE...THE INTERNAL TEMPERATURE NOT THE TIME IS YOUR BEST GUARANTEE FOR DONENESS so for a perfectly cooked prime rib roast invest in a meat thermometer and you will never go wrong with this recipe! --- if desired you may omit the au jus and just serve the roast, I prefer to make the au jus especially if I am serving this at a holiday table --- use nothing else but only fresh garlic, a little salt and lots of fresh ground black pepper for this or you could use 1 teaspoon garlic salt, using any other spices will take away the flavor, nothing else is needed --- cooking on very high heat then reducing the temperature will seal in all the meat juices to produce the most tender and flavorful prime rib, this actually is the method that a lot of the higher end restaurants use to make there prime rib and is the method I always use when I make prime rib roast at my home --- the cooking time stated on the recipe is for a 3-4 pound prime rib, you can use this method for a larger prime rib and increase the cooking time please see bottom of directions --- for a perfectly cooked prime rib roast a meat thermometer inserted in the roast should read about 140 degrees for medium-rare doneness, it is advised not to cook prime rib more that medium-rare ----- using more that the specified amount of salt will draw out the juices from the roast, you could add a little more but it is best to salt the meat after it is cooked, using a minimum amount of salt will insure a juicy tender prime rib roast, 1 teaspoon or less of salt will be fine, remember to remove your roast from the fridge about 2 hours before cooking --- also see my recipe#146196 this is a must served with prime rib!

    Recipe #82023

    I found this on the epicurean.com under Canadian recipes. I haven't tried it yet, but it claims to produce a moist, tasty ham that's not overly salty like most. Posted for ZWT.

    Recipe #305583

    An old family recipe and one of my favorite things to eat on a cold winter day! Notes: I like to keep the oxtail meat on the bones when serving- they taste delicious, too! But feel free to remove them after cooking and shred the meat if you prefer. Also try adding less water to this recipe and making a pot-pie from it.

    Recipe #222723

    I've seen a few recipes for this dish that are not in any way authentic to the Cuban version. Being that this is my absolute favorite dish and I'm a Cuban-American that's been eating this for as long as I can remember, I thought I'd share my version. Here's the recipe that I and most Cuban families here in Miami use. Of course, some people have their own special igredients, but I assure you that cocoa powder, celery, and chioptle chillies are not used in the traditional Cuban recipe. To me, what gives this dish its unique flavor is the dry cooking wine. I use Edmundo, which is found in just about any grocery store. Also, most people use perssure cookers and can have this done in less than 45 minutes. However, I use my trusty cast iron dutch oven and cook it for the full 2 hours. Niehter method makes a noticable difference in taste, it's just a matter of how much time you have. Hope you like it!

    Recipe #249765

    68 Reviews |  By Dawn

    Honey Baked Hams are basted in fruit juices and then glazed with a mixture of brown sugar and honey. Here is a copy cat recipe from Family Circle Magazine. Have to say, I love Honey Baked Hams. Makes 1 7 lb. ham.

    Recipe #45896

    When you serve these up, the joke is; you have to kill a lot of deer to get this many ;o). Of course, they aren't really deer family jewels--they are actually bite size pieces of deer back strap or tenderloin. I got this recipe from a Cajun gentleman I hunt with in Haughton LA named Claude. I "guarunteeee", even people who say they don't like venison will eat a plate full of these. I prefer to use Tony Cachere's Cajun seasoning, thin cut bacon, zesty Italian dressing, and cook them over mesquite, but any wood or charcoal will do. Enjoy!

    Recipe #150361

    An interesting way to use leftover roasted duck (if you are lucky enough to have leftovers) served as appetizers with Hot Corn Relish recipe#178036 or your favorite corn relish. Recipe source: Coyote Cafe

    Recipe #178014

    Russell found this recipe for quail in a Melbourne newspaper and plans to cook it for me soon (if I have my way!) The recipe suggests it serves 4 for a main course or 8 as an appetiser.

    Recipe #73905

    This is a recipe from Casa Rillo, my favorite Italian restaurant. Another way that Joey, the chef, would serve his Veal Marsala would be to add artichoke hearts, some sauteed prosciutto, and some sprinkled cheese on top. My mouth is starting to water (need to visit again soon)!

    Recipe #85090

    I got this recipe from "Top Secret Recipes" and it is the HoneyBaked Store recipe (or duplicate) that they use at the store. The hams are delivered at the stores already smoked and cooked; they are then sliced with the signature cut and then this recipe is used to caramelize them using a blow-torch. "Top Secret Recipes" only keeps this recipe up for two weeks on their site a year. The spices are ordinary pumpkin pie spices and you may substitute that for the first three spices. To get the coating just right, you must use a blowtorch. If you don't have one, you can find a small one in the hardware stores for around $15. Oh, Eleventhletter - I loved your suggestion to put it in a can of cola and baste it with that! Wonderful! THEN, when it's done - put on the sugar crust!

    Recipe #102699

    These are delicious cornish game hens, They take awhile to prepare ,but, are worth it. I have tripled the recipe. these are a family favorite. I found the recipe some time ago on the web.

    Recipe #42900


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