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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / Techniques
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    30 recipes in

    Techniques

    These recipes aren't about the ingredients but the techniques that are used. Ideas I don't want to forget!
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    Never buy store bought stock. If you cook with fresh ingredients like we do, you never have to buy anything on this recipe list as they are scraps from everyday produce. The ingredients listed are suggestions of what types of vegetables to keep, not that you need every item every time you make stock. Surely there are more vegetables to add to this list. I save EVERYTHING. Keep a freezer safe zip bag in your freezer and pile in the scraps. When you are ready to make stock, simply put the frozen scraps in a pot of water and boil for several hours. This is also a starter base for chicken or beef stock. Simply throw in leftover bones.

    Recipe #499288

    11 Reviews |  By Debbwl

    One of my neighbors was telling me this is her favorite way to make corn. She bakes the corn in the husk and then peels it back and uses the husk as a handle. *posted corn as two ingredients because that is the only way Food would take it.

    Recipe #434212

    When I was young, my mother made pumpkin pie from homemade pumpkin puree made from fresh pumpkins or hubbard squash we grew ourselves. Ahhhhh... good times! Being lazy, I have developed my own very simple method for creating pumpkin puree, which, surprisingly, has not been posted here previously. My method is faster and easier than the other recipes, which require baking the pumpkin for an hour or more and removing the skin, before or after cooking. I believe that you save a lot of the nutrition, particularly vitamin A, that would be lost if you were to remove the skin. You will be amazed at how smooth the puree is, even with the skin blended in. I also wanted to include some excellent notes from other contributors, or you can reference their recipes, on selecting the pumpkin or squash to make the puree. Notes from PainterCook (Recipe #290894) on hubbard squash Hubbard squash is sweeter and heartier than pumpkin.... You can easily substitute Butternut Squash with great results... Notes from Kim D. (Recipe #331853) on selecting a pumpkin I always use "sugar" pumpkins, also known as "pie" pumpkins.... much smaller ... and are much more tender and flavorful. --CHOOSING THE RIGHT PUMPKIN-- ... always choose a pumpkin that is free of blemishes and have been harvested with their stems intact. The pumpkin should feel heavy for their size and should have a dull skin. A pumpkin with a shiny skin was either harvested too early or was waxed by the grower. --STORING PUMPKINS-- Store pumpkins in a cool, dry place at 45F - 60F for up to a month, or refrigerate for up to 3 months. To store pumpkins for an extended time, wash the skins of the pumpkin with a solution of 1 tablespoon chlorine bleach to 1 gallon water to disinfect the skins and discourage the growth of mold.

    Recipe #333009

    The perfect pot of English tea leads to the perfect cup of English tea! I know this is NOT a recipe, but it is amazing how many people do not know how to make a PROPER POT of tea! We always make a pot of tea at home - even if there is only one of us here, we just use a smaller pot! I also prefer loose tea to tea-bags, but we do use good quality tea-bags as well. This is my method for making a perfect pot of tea, and therefore a perfect cuppa. This has been posted due to a request from my daughter, who obviously has FAR more sophisticated tastes as a university student than I did when I was one!! Plus, what can be nicer then baking a cake, inviting a couple of friends over and having a natter with a cuppa? It puts the world to rights! Quantities are listed for a pot of tea for two.....you can increase or decrease the amounts to suit.The following extract is from Mrs Beeton's book of Household Management printed in 1880; here she suggests the method for a "perfect" cup of tea, using loose tea of course and NOT tea bags! "There is very little art in making good tea; if the water is boiling, and there is no sparing of the fragrant leaf, the beverage will almost invariably be good. The old-fashioned plan of allowing a teaspoonful to each person, and one over, is still practised. Warm the teapot with boiling water; let it remain for two or three minutes for the vessel to become thoroughly hot, then pour it away. Put in the tea, pour in from 1/2 to 3/4 pint of boiling water, close the lid, and let it stand for the tea to draw from 5 to 10 minutes; then fill up the pot with water. The tea will be quite spoiled unless made with water that is actually ‘boiling’, as the leaves will not open, and the flavour not be extracted from them; the beverage will consequently be colourless and tasteless,—in fact, nothing but tepid water. Where there is a very large party to make tea for, it is a good plan to have two teapots instead of putting a large quantity of tea into one pot; the tea, besides, will go farther. When the infusion has been once completed, the addition of fresh tea adds very little to the strength; so, when more is required, have the pot emptied of the old leaves, scalded, and fresh tea made in the usual manner."

    Recipe #263420

    These easy-to-prepare sweet potatoes pack a big flavor punch. This is out of a Weight Watchers cookbook called "Best of Weight Watchers Magazine" There is only 1 point per serving.

    Recipe #238240

    I had a rommate for 6 years who was from England. One day he told me jokingly that he loved this country but "we Americans just don't know how to make a proper cup of Tea" He felt it was his duty to teach me how and he was right! This is the only way I will drink my Tea now. It is really more of a method than a recipe. After careful instruction on how to prepare the proper cup of tea I asked him whether loose tea leaves make a better brew than a tea bag. "Loose tea will always taste better," he said, "but, not so much better as to outweigh the convenience of the bag. What's more important is the type of tea that you choose." "In Britain, the standard supermarket tea bag makes a much stronger and more robust brew than your American tea." He said the closest tea bags he ever found over here that approach the quality of their everyday blends are those marketed as English Breakfast. My friend always made his Tea with lowfat milk and sugar. Explaining "Most English drink tea with a little milk, but never with cream or the high-fat milk that Americans put in their coffee. Low-fat milk is a much better choice. "Make sure you use white sugar. Brown sugar might be OK in coffee, but somehow it never tastes right in tea. As for putting honey in tea, if you tried to do that in Britain, you'd be laughed out of the tea shop." Many thanks to Chris for showing me how to make the perfect cup of tea!

    Recipe #230372

    I found this interesting idea in the book Thai Food by David Thompson. The author suggests steaming for 10 minutes for a slightly soft yolk, but as I desired a firmer yolk steamed for 12 minutes and let them cool at room temperature for a while. David is right that they are more tender than a boiled egg, not a huge difference but these are just that subtly bit better than a boiled egg. Well worth a try for anything where you would otherwise use a boiled egg.

    Recipe #228819

    A great way to lightly flavor fruit and even tofu from the inside. Anything that can be "skewered" will have a little extra flavor. The possibilities are endless. This is one of many choices Check out my others.

    Recipe #227473

    22 Reviews |  By anme

    Easy and fast way to make pan fried spuds.

    Recipe #226112

    The sour cream, believe it or not, makes scrambled eggs heavenly. They are so fluffy and good. I was told years ago that you never put milk in scrambled eggs, BUT water. Can you believe it? I tried it and never put milk in them again.

    Recipe #215019

    Here you will find easy step-by-step instructions that will result in the best juiciest turkey you will ever have! cooking the turkey breast-side down will create a tender juicy turkey without brining or using other methods --- if you are stuffing the turkey you will need approximately 8 cups of prepared stuffing for an 18-pound turkey --- the cooking time for this recipe is for an 18-pound stuffed turkey cooked at 325 degrees F but you have the option of stuffing or not --- my best advise for a beginner is to use a meat thermometer inserted in the breast area, this way you will be assured that your turkey is cooked to the proper temperature, you can cover the uncooked stuffed turkey with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight and just pop it in the oven the following mid-morning or whenever you are ready to cook the turkey --- make certain that you have lots of chicken broth handy for this recipe as you will most likely need to keep adding more into the pan while cooking --- see cooking times on the bottom for whole turkeys --- see my recipe#145064

    Recipe #199612

    My mother spoke of having bonfires when she was young, growing up on Long Island. The kids would throw potatoes into the fire. She said they would be burned and hard on the outside with light fluffy potatoes on the inside. When cooked this way, the outside is very crisp and crunchy, and the inside nice and fluffy. We throw a bunch of potatoes into the oven of the wood cook stove many, many nights during the winter months. We frequently put them in the gas stove, in warmer months, when cooking a roast, or other oven dinner. But somehow, "mickies" are not the same unless cooked in our Home Comfort! We always think of Mother when we have mickies.

    Recipe #197960

    8 Reviews |  By TeresaS

    This is a recipe that I used to make all the time when DH and I had Kids at home and money was a big issue. It is off a recipe card from Betty Crocker back in 1971. It's from the "Best before payday dinner" card. I used it alot and still make it once in a while because it is so good. I should put it in my "Money is tight now that I'm retired cookbook". (For future use) Based on Chef Tweaker's review I have moved some of the steps for ease in preparing this dish.

    Recipe #196586

    If pumpkin seeds are properly toasted they are wonderfully crunchy to eat, boiling the seeds in the stated amounts of water will create the best crunchy pumpkin seeds --- you will use 2 cups water to every 1/2 cup seeds and about 2 teaspoons of salt to every 2 cups water --- yield is only estimated it will depend on how much seeds you get from one medium pumpkin.

    Recipe #191390

    This recipe can be substituted in ANY pasta sauce or recipe, and it can be eaten hot or cold. Very versatile main or side dish - and very hard to screw up.

    Recipe #162765

    This is awesome! If you love brisket or beef cooked in the smoker and just don't have time to, or maybe the weather won't permit- you have to try this. I have used EVERY cut of beef roast or brisket, it always comes out great! Enjoy!

    Recipe #140878

    Whenever I need cooked beets, I don't boil them, I bake them. They're less messy, easier to handle and far tastier. The moisture is inside the beets, not in the boiling water. I've included 2 ways to use them.

    Recipe #72861

    This is how my Granny made sweet tea and it is some kind of sweet. Know that and beware. Pa-Paw used to down 2-3 glasses after working in the garden all day. Back off the sugar if you can't handle it. This one is for true southerners only ;)

    Recipe #63785

    I got this from the Barefoot Contessa Cookbook. SO good.

    Recipe #56103

    Scalding the turkey makes for a very nice moist turkey. I have been doing this method for over 25 years. Cooking time shown in the method is for a 16 pound stuffed turkey.

    Recipe #46262

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