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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / Take Time for Tea
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    72 recipes in

    Take Time for Tea

    In here you will find tea recipes I have posted along with recipes using tea!
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    A lovely way to have iced tea! Adapted from Everyday Italian. Take this to a picnic, or just take it out to the front porch!

    Recipe #178833

    I got a kick out of this and thought you might too. Boiling water is essential to many recipes. If you have never cooked before, don't worry. It is not as difficult as it may appear. This recipe will guide you through the process, even if you have never set foot in a kitchen. Adapted from Serious Eats. Submitted by Adam Kuban. Thanks Adam!

    Recipe #445229

    In Mexico, or Spain for that matter, garlic tea is served up for coughs or colds. People swear by it! The garlic oils inhibit cough and cold microbes, and they are effective decongestants. Lemon juice reduces and thins mucus, which makes it easier to unclog a stuffed up respiratory system. Lemon juice also changes the body's pH, making it less hospitable to viruses and bacteria. Adapted from Prevention magazine.

    Recipe #139436

    These herbs are known for helping relax and make you sleepy. Drink this before bedtime and get a good nights sleep! The original recipe calls for 1 1/2 oz Vervain leaves, but Zaar won't let vervain go through so I have modified it. Please feel free to use the vervain, it is good for nervousness, will tone up the system, good for stomach troubles. Adapted from Herbal Teas. This may be put in a jar with directions and given as a gift too, perhaps with some bath crystals and a good book! You may also use valerian instead or with the vervain. Look in your health food stores for these teas.

    Recipe #190691

    This sounds exotic, yet is so simple, and yummy!

    Recipe #158763

    This description is from Back to Eden, a book written early this century. I do not mean to offend anybody, just quoting what the book says. "It has been said American people would do well if they would use sage instead of tea and coffee. The Chinese make fun of the American people because they buy the expensive tea for their drink and pay a big price for it, while the Chinese buy sage from America for a small price and drink that for their tea, which is a most wonderful remedy. The Chinese know that the sage tea will keep them well, while the tea that we buy from the Chinese makes us sick, is a cause of great nervousness and one of the causes of insanity. Sage tea is very soothing to the nerves, good for stomach troubles, gas, makes an excellent gargle for the throat, will expel worms, stop bleeding of wounds, good for liver and kidney troubles, a good wash for wounds, good hair tonic, fever reducer, and good for circulation. This tea should not be boiled, just steeped." Information came from Back To Eden by Jethro Kloss.

    Recipe #132042

    From Stop and Eat the Flowers by Rachel Sanfordlyn Shreckengast, this is a nice tea to relax with. The common name, Bee Balm, comes from the folk use of the flowers, pounded into a poultice, to ease the pain of bee stings. Bee balm is a member of the mint family, and is also called Bergamot. Bee balm's alternate name "Oswego Tea" was bestowed upon it by pioneer botanist John Bartram (1699-1777) who observed Oswego Indians using it for tea. As a tea, the odor & flavor is a mix of citrus & mint, well worth harvesting from one's garden for this purpose. He sent the seeds to England, where it is cultivated commercially. Bee balm grows in many areas of the United States, including New England, Mid Atlantic, Mid West, Southwest, and the West. Also England.

    Recipe #126171

    Peppermint tea helps indigestion, head colds, headaches, appetite loss, bronchitis, and fever and gall bladder problems. It can be used as a blood and liver tonic. Lemon balm will perk you up in the morning, help bloating, gas, mood disorders, bronchial inflammation, high blood pressure, mild vomiting, toothache, earache and headaches, has anti-bacterial and anti-viral properties. Lemon balm is said to be good for depression and helps relieve cramps. Great to package and give as gifts too! Recipe originated from Europe-England, France, etc.

    Recipe #190700

    I spent some time in Guatemala many years ago and we had a lovely vegetarian dinner at a local woman's house on New Year's Eve. Oh, it was so good! There were these tamales with raisins and we were served a tea that tasted of apples and chamomile. Here is my attempt to duplicate that recipe! I wish I could remember more about the tamales.......Outside, the local folk were shooting off sticks of dynamite (for lack of fireworks), but we didn't care, we were in foodie vegetarian heaven!

    Recipe #348910

    This is a great tea to drink after dinner, before bedtime. Chamomile tea has soothing, calming and relaxing properties. It helps digestion, coughs, colds, poor skin, and is used as a liver tonic. Adapted from Herbal Teas.

    Recipe #190742

    Under the pulsing sun, tea ladies line the streets of Sudan. They soak up what little shade they can find. Water simmers over charcoal stoves. They swirl ingredients through the steam, into the pot. Many patrons like to hold a sugar cube between the teeth while drinking to sweeten the brew. The most popular of the teas is cinnamon, with mint and ginger following close behind. Here's my version. Adapted from Global Table Adventure.

    Recipe #502745

    A cozy drink with a little spice-ginger, a little kick-lemon, and a little soothing-honey! This drink is good cold too! This drink is excellent as an expectorant tea and/or a sore throat soother. Even if you aren't under the weather, this warming beverage will make you feel restored and comfy! Adapted from Growing 101 Herbs That Heal by Tammi Hartung.

    Recipe #277516

    Lavender is a tonic that has been use to prevent fainting and helps prevent nausea. Chamomile has soothing, relaxing properties. Together, they make a lovely tea!

    Recipe #190699

    This is a soothing a refreshing cool drink for any occasion. Recipe from Herbal Musings.

    Recipe #431881

    Try this refreshing herbal soda, the next time you are having a party! It taste crisp, light, and different from plain bottled pop. If you enjoy the flavor, substitute another favorite herb for the lemon balm. Cooking time is time for water to come to a boil. From about.com.

    Recipe #431885

    Lemongrass and ginger infuse this lightly sweetened, refreshing iced tea with subtle flavor. From about.com.

    Recipe #501807

    Our liver needs to function well for our body to feel good. This is a great tea to help support the liver. From the Herbal Encyclopedia.

    Recipe #199076

    In this region, the tea is always served sweet. Adjust the sweetness to your liking.

    Recipe #171615

    They keep cool in Niger by drinking this hot tea, which makes them sweat, which cools them off. Pleasing on cool days too. From Sasha Martin.

    Recipe #502449

    This is good hot too! Recipe courtesy Giada De Laurentiis from Foodnetwork Show: Giada at HomeEpisode: Weeknight Special

    Recipe #508394

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